8 ways to attend college for free
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German Mythology

German Mythology Names

These names occur in Germanic mythologies and legends.




List of Gods : "German" - 114 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Hulda"
German Goddess of marriage and fecundity, who sent bridegrooms to maidens and children to the married. German
God name
"Irmin"
Germanic The mythical founder of the Hermiones tribe, son of Mannus, war god, Germanic
God name
"Irmin"
Germanic war god. Probably equating with TIWAZ, the name implies one of great strength. In Saxony, there is the so-called Irmin pillar which may be a reference to the deity....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Angel name
"Irmiongot"
Germanic This possibly Irmin, found in The Hildebrandslied, strangely the poem shows Christian influence
Goddess name
"Jord"
Icelandic / Germanic An earth goddess mentioned in the Edda by Snorri
Planet name
"Jupiter"
Roman Jupiter is, properly speaking, a derivation of Jove and pater (Latin for father) The name of the god was also adopted as the name of the planet Jupiter, and was the original namesake of the weekday that would come to be known in English as Thursday (the etymological root can be seen in French jeudi, from Jovis Dies). The Indo-European deity who also evolved into the Germanic Tiwaz (after whom Tuesday was named), the Greek Zeus, and Dyaus Pita of the Vedic religion. Jove is a vocative form of the name, evolved from Dyeus. Roman

"Kobold"
German A German household goblin, also frequenting mines.
Goddess name
"Kornjunfer"
Germanic Goddess of grain germanic
God name
"Lodur"
Germanic Creator god mentioned in the creation myth. germanic
Deities name
"Lodur"
Germanic Creator god. Mentioned in påśśing in the creation mythology as being one of a trio of deities, with Odin and HOENIR, who engendered mankind.See also OTHIN....
God name
"Lodur[r]"
Germanic A creator god mentioned in the creation myth
God name
"Lothur"
Nordic / Icelandic God of physical senses. According to a brief mention in the Voluspa (Poetic Edda) the god concerned with physical being i.e. sight, hearing and speech. According to some authors he may be a hypostasis of the god OTHIN. Lothur is also known in northern Germanic tradition. Also LODUR....
God name
"Magni"
German This is a god of the future who has not yet arrived & a son of Thor
Demon name
"Mahr"
Germanic demonic being similar to an Alp germanic / Slavic
God name
"Mani"
Germanic / Nordic / Icelandic moon god. He guides the chariot of the moon through the night sky and is involved in the downfall of the world at Ragnarok....
God name
"Modi"
German / Norse This son of Thor is a god that has yet to arrive
Hero name
"Munchausen"
German The hero of a volume of travels, who meets with the most marvellous adventures. The incidents have been compiled from various sources, and the name is said to have pointed to Hieronymus Karl Friedrich von Munchhausen, a German officer in the Russian army, noted for his marvellous stories.
Goddess name
"Nanna"
Germanic A goddess of plants & flowers
Goddess name
"Nanna"
Germanic Goddess of plants and flowers. Germanic
Goddess name
"Nemetona"
Roman / Celtic Goddess of sacred groves. Consort to the Roman deity MARS. Evidenced at places such as Bath (England) and Mainz (Germany); but also in place names which include the etymological base nemeton (a shrine)....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.


ASES
In the mythology of the North, we call Ases the members of one of the two great families of gods (godh or gudh), the other being that of the Vanes, all these gods opposing giants, dwarves, elves and other supernatural creatures.
BALDR
In the Nordic pantheon, the god Ase (called Baldr) detonates. Son of Ódhinn and Frigg, kind, pure, fair, he impresses with his gentleness, his wisdom, his mercy and his helpfulness, all qualities that do not correspond exactly to what we can know about the old Nordic ethics.
FREYJA
In the mythology of the North, the goddess Freyja occupies a central place, but it is difficult to define exactly her personality: her licentiousness explains that the commentators of the Middle Ages, who are our main sources and who were Christians, were discreet.
BRÜNHILD, BRÜNNHILDE or BRYNHILDR
A warrior princess of great beauty, heroine of medieval Germanic epic literature and appearing in ancient Norse and Nordic sources (songs of the Edda, Icelandic saga of the Völsungar) and, in German, in the Nibelungenlied (early 13th century century, the Song of the Nibelungen). Called Brynhild, Brynhildr Brünhild, Brünnhilde or Brunehilde according to sources, she is the main character of the epic poems of poetic Edda where she appears, but her role is significantly reduced in The Song of the Nibelungen.
FREYR
Like his father, Njördhr, and his sister (or female double), Freyja, the Nordic god Freyr, of the Vanes family, is unquestionably master of fertility-fertility, even if, in recent times, meaning or intersections tend to make him a more martial deity.
LOKI
In northern mythology, Loki is the god of Evil. But this definition is not very enlightening, because the conception that one can make of the "evil" varies infinitely with the places, the eras, the men, the cultures; and, as the North presents a phenomenon characterized by brewing (especially of people and influences), it is almost discouraging to try to specify the outlines of Loki's enigmatic figure par excellence.