8 ways to attend college for free
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German Mythology

German Mythology Names

These names occur in Germanic mythologies and legends.




List of Gods : "German" - 114 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
King name
"Nibelungen Hoard"
German A mythical måśś of gold and precious stones, which Siegfried obtained from the Nibelungs, and gave to his wife Kriemhild as her marriage portion. It was guarded by Albric the dwarf. After the murder of Siegfried, his widow removed the hoard to Worms; here Hagan seized it, and buried it secretly beneath "the Rhine at Lochham," intending at a future time to enjoy it, "but that was ne'er to be." Kriemhild married Etzel with the view of avenging her wrongs. In time Gunther, with Hagan and a host of Burgundians, went to visit king Etzel, and Kriemhild stirred up a great broil, at the end of which a most terrible slaughter ensued. Volsunga Saga

"Nix"
German Kind busy-body. Little creatures not unlike the Scotish brownie and German kobold. They wear a red cap, and are ever ready to lend a helping hand to the industrious and thrifty. "Another tribe of water-fairies are the Nixes, who frequently åśśume the appearance of beautiful maidens."- T. F. T. Dyer: Folk-lore of plants
King name
"Oberon"
German Oberon king of the Fairies, whose wife was Titania. Shakespeare introduces both Oberon and Titania, in his Midsummer night's Dream. (Auberon, anciently Alberon, German Alberich, king of the elves.)
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Angel name
"Olinda"
German An angel who is the protector of property. German

"Ostara"
German The old High German name for the Easter festival.
Goddess name
"Ostara"
Germanic Sun goddess. Associated with the coming of spring and one of the derivations of the term Easter, she equates with the Anglo-Saxon deity EOSTRE....
Goddess name
"Ostara/ Easter"
Germanic A goddess of spring & the Sun
Spirit name
"Phynnodderee"
German Phynnodderee [the Hairy-one]. A Manx spirit, similar to the Scotch "brownie," and German "kobold." He is said to be an outlawed fairy, and the offence was this: He absented himself without leave from Fairy-court on the great levee-day of the Harvest-moon, being in the glen of Rushen, dancing with a pretty Manx maid whom he was courting.

"Poldunica"
Germany Polednica, Poludnica, Lady Midday. A young girl, a beautiful maiden or a crone who appears at the hottest part of a summer's day. She carries a scythe and will stop people in the field to ask difficult questions and if the person fails to answer a question or is evasive,she will strike them with illness or cut off their head. Germany
Goddess name
"Rheda"
German A valkirie and goddess of the Winter. German
Goddess name
"Rind"
Northern Germanic / Nordic / Icelandic Chthonic goddess. She is mentioned as a consort of OTHIN and mother of VALI. Also Rinda; Rindr....
Spirit name
"Samiel"
German The Black Huntsman of the Wolf's Glen. A Satanic spirit, who gave to a marksman who entered into compact with him seven balls, six of which were to hit infallibly whatever was aimed at, but the seventh was to deceive. The person who made this compact was termed Der Freischutz. German
Deities name
"Saxnot"
Saxon Tutelary god. He is mentioned beside Woden and Thunor as one of the deities to be renounced at Christian baptism. As Saxneat he was allegedly the founder of the Saxon royal dynasty in Essex. The name may derive from the word sahsginot meaning “companion of the sword.” He may also equate with the German god Tyr....
Goddess name
"Sessrumnir"
Germanic Goddess of fertility. Germanic
Goddess name
"Sif"
Nordic / Icelandic / / Germanic corn goddess. The consort of THOR. She is mentioned in the Eddaic Lay of Lokasenna and in the Lay of Har barth. According to Snorri Sturluson she was originally a prophetess called Sibyl. She possesses great beauty and has long golden hair. Her sons are ULL and Loridi. According to tradition, LOKI cut off Sif's hair in mischief, but when confronted and threatened by Thor, he had the dwarfs make her a magical hairpiece of pure gold which, when it touched her head, became a living part of her and grew....
Goddess name
"Sindgund"
Germanic Goddess of healing charms. Germanic
Goddess name
"Sirona"
Celtic / Roman A local goddess of healing from the Moselle basin of Germany
Goddess name
"Sirona"
Roman / Celtic / Gallic Local goddess of healing. Known from limited inscriptions in which she is usually åśśociated with the god GRANNUS or with the Celtic APOLLO. A sculpture from Hochscheid in the Moselle basin in Germany describes her with a snake round her wrist reaching toward a bowl of three eggs in her left hand. She may also have a small lapdog. Some authors suggest she has sky åśśociations.See also DIVONA and ONUAVA....
God name
"Taranis"
Roman / Celtic / Gallic Thunder god. Known only from limited inscriptions, but may emulate the Germanic god DONAR and is possibly the same as Taranucos. The Romans equated him with JUPITER and a Jupiter Tanarus inscription at Chester in England may refer to Taranis. His symbol is a spoked wheel and he is presumed to be the object of savage rites. The modern Breton word for thunder is taran. Also Taranos....
God name
"Thunor"
Germanic God of fertility, lightning and thunder germanic
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.


ASES
In the mythology of the North, we call Ases the members of one of the two great families of gods (godh or gudh), the other being that of the Vanes, all these gods opposing giants, dwarves, elves and other supernatural creatures.
BALDR
In the Nordic pantheon, the god Ase (called Baldr) detonates. Son of Ódhinn and Frigg, kind, pure, fair, he impresses with his gentleness, his wisdom, his mercy and his helpfulness, all qualities that do not correspond exactly to what we can know about the old Nordic ethics.
FREYJA
In the mythology of the North, the goddess Freyja occupies a central place, but it is difficult to define exactly her personality: her licentiousness explains that the commentators of the Middle Ages, who are our main sources and who were Christians, were discreet.
BRÜNHILD, BRÜNNHILDE or BRYNHILDR
A warrior princess of great beauty, heroine of medieval Germanic epic literature and appearing in ancient Norse and Nordic sources (songs of the Edda, Icelandic saga of the Völsungar) and, in German, in the Nibelungenlied (early 13th century century, the Song of the Nibelungen). Called Brynhild, Brynhildr Brünhild, Brünnhilde or Brunehilde according to sources, she is the main character of the epic poems of poetic Edda where she appears, but her role is significantly reduced in The Song of the Nibelungen.
FREYR
Like his father, Njördhr, and his sister (or female double), Freyja, the Nordic god Freyr, of the Vanes family, is unquestionably master of fertility-fertility, even if, in recent times, meaning or intersections tend to make him a more martial deity.
LOKI
In northern mythology, Loki is the god of Evil. But this definition is not very enlightening, because the conception that one can make of the "evil" varies infinitely with the places, the eras, the men, the cultures; and, as the North presents a phenomenon characterized by brewing (especially of people and influences), it is almost discouraging to try to specify the outlines of Loki's enigmatic figure par excellence.