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List of Gods : "A Si"
NameOriginDescription
A / Aa, Sirdu, Sirrida Akkadia / Semitic A (also Aa, Sirdu, Sirrida). Moon Goddess of Chaldeans. Symbolized by a disk with eight rays, this figure is frequently associated with goddesses of light across many cultures including Babylon, Mesopotamia, Akkadia and Semitic.
Aabit Egypt Singing Goddess. Rules over music, song, voice, arts. Egypt
Aba khatun Baikal/ Siberia A sea goddess
Aba khatun Baikal Siberia Goddess of the sea. Siberia
Abandinus Celtic An obscure Celtic deity, possibly a river-god. He is currently known only from a single inscription from Godmanchester in Cambridgeshire, England: a bronze votive feather is dedicated to him with the fragmentary text "to the god Abandinus, Vatiaucus gave this from his own resources" inscribed on a plaque.
Abel and Cain Islam Cain was born with a twin sister who was named Aclima, and Abel with a twin sister named Jumella. Adam wished Cain to marry Abel's twin sister, and Abel to marry Cain's. Cain would not consent to this arrangement, and Adam proposed to refer the question to God by means of a sacrifice. God rejected Cain's sacrifice to signify his disapproval of his marriage with Aclima, his twin sister, and Cain slew his brother in a fit of jealousy. Islam
Abhaswaras Hindu A class of deities, sixty-four in number, of whose nature little is known. Hindu
Abiala Africa Wife of Makambi; African deities. She holds a pistol in her hand, and is greatly feared. Her aid is implored in sickness.
Abigor Christian A warrior demon who commands sixty legions and a Grand Duke of Hell. Can fortell future and give military advice.
Abnoba Celtic Goddess of the hunt, similar to the Roman Diana. Celtic
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Abominable snowman Himalayas A legendary creature, said to resemble a human, with long arms and a thickset body covered with reddish gray hair. Reports of its existence in the Himalayas have been made since 1832.
Acchupta Jain One of the sixteen Mahavidyas in the Jaina pantheon. Jain
Acestes Roman A son of the Sicilian river-god Crimisus and of a Trojan woman of the name of Egesta or Segesta
Acraea Greek A daughter of the river-god Asterion near Mycenae, who together with her sisters Euboea and Prosymna acted as nurses to Hera.
Acrasia Britain Self-indulgence. An enchantress who lived in the "Bower of Bliss," situate in "Wandering Island" She transformed her lovers into monstrous shapes, and kept them captives. Sir Guyon having crept up softly, threw a net over her, and bound her in chains of adamant; then broke down her bower and burnt it to ashes. Britain.
Adamisil Wedo . Si Adaman Haiti Goddess of water Haiti
Adnachiel Christian The angel of the sun sign Sagittarius. Ask him nicely and he'll grant you independence, honesty and chat-up lines. Christian
Aega Greek A daughter of Olenus, who was a descendant of Hephaestus. Aega and her sister Helice nursed the infant Zeus in Crete, and the former was afterwards changed by the god into the constellation called Capella. Greek
Aegis Greek In Homer, is the shield or buckler of Zeus, fashioned for him by Hephaestus, furnished with tassels and bearing the Gorgon's head in the centre. Originally symbolic of the storm-cloud, it is probably derived from aisso, signifying rapid, violent motion.
Aeneas Greek The son of Anchises and Aphrodite, and born on mount Ida. On his father's side he was a greatgrandson of Tros, and thus nearly related to the royal house of Troy, as Priam himself was a grandson of Tros. He was educated from his infancy at Dardanus, in the house of Alcathous, the husband of his sister.
Aerial Demons Greek One of the six classes of demons identified by medieval theologians. They roam through the air but remain close to human beings.
Aesymnetes Greek A surname of Dionysus, which signifies the Lord, or Ruler, and under which he was worshipped at Aroe in Achaia. Greek
Aetna Roman A Sicilian nymph, and according to Alcimus, a daughter of Uranus and Gaea, or of Briareus. Simonides said that she had acted as arbitrator between Hephaestus and Demeter respecting the possession of Sicily.
Aeval Celtic A goddess of sexual relations & small size
Agave Greek Daughter of Cadmus, and wife of the Spartan Echion, by whom she became the mother of Pentheus, who succeeded his grandfather Cadmus as king of Thebes. Agave was the sister of Autonoe, Ino, and Semele (Apollodorus iii), and when Semele, during her pregnancy with Dionysus, was destroyed by the sight of the splendour of Zeus, her sisters spread the report that she had only endeavoured to conceal her guilt, by pretending that Zeus was the father of her child, and that her destruction was a just punishment for her falsehood.
Ah Kin Xoc Mayan God of poetry, a singer and musician Mayan
Aha Yakut/ Siberia A river spirit, female type
Aholibah Islam The personification of prostitution. Used by the prophet to signify religious adultery or harlotry. Islam
Aife aka Aoife Ireland/Scotland Goddess and queen of the Isle of Shadow. She ran a school for warriors, but her school was less successful than her sister, Scathach's, school. Aife was not vulnerable to magic, and commanded a legion of fierce horsewomen. She stole an alphabet of knowledge from the deities to give to humankind. For that infraction, she was transformed into a crane by the elder deities. Ireland/Scotland
Aine Ireland A faerie goddess, sister to Fennine, daughter to Egogabal who was a king of the Tuatha de Danann. Ireland
Aizen-Myoo Japan The god of tavern keepers, musicians, singers, prostitutes & love
Ajysyt Siberia / Yakut Goddess of healing and birth. she writes every new birth into a golden book. Siberia
Akandoji Shinto This monster had stolen a great deal of gold and silver from the villagers. It was said that he was so terrible that no one dared go against him, to try to recover the riches. Shinto
Akatriel Christian The angel who sits close to God and speaks for Him. Christian
Alacomenia Greek One of the daughters of Ogyges, who as well as her two sisters, Thelxionoea and Aulis, were regarded as supernatural beings, who watched over oaths and saw that they were not taken rashly or thoughtlessly. Greek
Alalcomeneis Greek A surname of Athena, derived from the hero Alalcomenes, signifies "powerful defender".
Alauwaimis Hittite Demon who drives away evil and sickness Hittite
Albion the Giant Britain Fourth son of Neptune, sixth son of Osiris, and brother of Hercules, his mother being Amphitrita. Albion the Giant was put by his father in possession of the isle of Britain, where he speedily subdued the Samotheans, the first inhabitants. His brother Bergion ruled over Ireland and the Orkneys. Another of his brothers was Lestrigo, who subjected Italy.
Albunea Greek A prophetic nymph or Sibyl, to whom in the neighbourhood of Tibur a grove was consecrated, with a well and a temple. Near it was the oracle of Faunus Fatidicus. (The Aeneid by Virgil vii)
Alifanfaron the giant Greek Don Quixote attacked a flock of sheep, which he declared to be the army of the giant Alifanfaron. Similarly Ajax, in a fit of madness, fell upon a flock of sheep, which he mistook for Grecian princes.
Althaea Greek A daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius and Eurythemis, and sister of Lecla, Hypermnestra, Iphiclus, Euippus, etc. She was married to Oeneus, king of Calydon, by whom she became the mother of Troxeus, Thyreus, Clymenus, and Meleager, and of two daughters, Gorge and Deianeira. (Apollodorus i) Apollodorus states, that according to some, Meleager was regarded as the fruit of her intercourse with Ares, and that she was mother of Deianeira by Dionysus.
Ama Siberia Goddess of the dark and of the underworld. Siberia
Amagandar Siberia / Tungus Protective female spirits who protect innocent souls from the curse that belongs anothers. Siberia
Amagandar/ Orokannar Tungus/ Siberia Protective female spirits
Amaimon Hebrew One of the chief devils whose dominion is on the north side of the infernal gulf. He might be bound or restrained from doing hurt from the third hour till noon, and from the ninth hour till evening. Hebrew
Amaltheia Crete The nurse of the infant Zeus after his birth in Crete. The ancients themselves appear to have been as uncertain about the etymology of the name as about the real nature of Amaltheia. Hesychius derives it from the verb to nourish or to enrich, others from firm or hard; and others again from to signify the divine goat, or the tender goddess. The common derivation is from to milk or suck.
Ami Neter Egypt A singing god who rules over winds and song. Egypt
Amphiaraus Greek A son of Oicles and Hypermnestra, the daughter of Thestius. On his father's side he was descended from the famous seer Melampus.
Anapel Siberia / Koryak "Little Grandmother" Goddess who presides over birth and reincarnation Koryak
Anat Phonecian Major Goddess of battle, bloodshed, and hunting, renowned for her hot temper and excitability. She killed the God Mot (temporarily) for her brother's sake. Daughter of Baal, sister of Aleyin. She appears as a maiden who rides a lion and carries shield, spear, and axe. Phonecian
Anat Ugarit A violent war-goddess and the sister of the great Ba‘al known as Hadad. Warrior virgin, slayer of snakes, goddess of fertility. Ugarit
Anat / Athene Greek Anat and Athene In a Cyprian inscription the Greek goddess Athкna Sфteira Nikк is equated with ‘Anat. Anat is also presumably the goddess whom Sanchuniathon calls Athene, a daughter of El, mother unnamed, who with Hermes (that is Anubis) councelled El on the making of a sickle and a spear of iron, presumably to use against his father Uranus. However, in the Baal cycle, that rфle is assigned to Asherah / Elat and Anat is there called the "Virgin."
Anaxibia Greek 1. A daughter of Bias and wife of Pelias, by whom she became the mother of Acastus, Peisidice, Pelopia, Hippothoe, and Alcestis. (Apollodorus) 2. A daughter of Cratieus, and second wife of Nestor. (Apollodorus) 3. A daughter of Pleisthenes, and sister of Agamemnon, married Strophius and became the mother of Pylades.
Andraemon Greek The husband of Gorge, the daughter of the Calydonian king Oeneus, and father of Thoas. When Diomedes delivered Oeneus, who had been imprisoned by the sons of Agrius, he gave the kingdom to Andraemon, since Oeneus was already too old.
Andriaahoabu Madagascar High Lady who descends to earth on a silver chain Madagascar
Angels Of Prayer Christian Seven angels who convey the prayers of the saints to God. Akatriel, Gabriel, Metatron, Raphael, Sandalphon, Sizouse and Michael. Christian
Angels of Vengeance Greek Twelve angels among the first formed at Creation, although according to official Catholic doctrine, all angels were formed simultaneously. Only five are mentioned by name: Saten'el, Michael, Uriel, Rappheal and Nathan'el.
Angerona Roman Goddess of anguish, secrecy, silence and the winter solstice. According to one class of passages she is the goddess of anguish and fear, that is, the goddess who not only produces this state of mind, but also relieves men from it. Roman
Ankalamman Hindu/Dravidian Guardian goddess who wards off demons. Sister of Draupadi. Hindu/Dravidian
Anqa Turkish A fabulous bird of enormous size which inhabits the Caucasus range. Turkish
Anshur aka Ashur Akkadian Or Asshur, a sky god and the husband of his sister Kishar ("earth axle"); they are the children of the serpents Lahmu and Lahamu, and the parents of Anu and Ea. He is sometimes depicted as having Ninlil as a consort. As Anshar, he is progenitor of the Akkadian pantheon; as Ashur, he is the head of the Assyrian pantheon
Anteros Greek (Anterфs) was the son of Ares and Aphrodite, given to his brother Eros, who was lonely, as a playmate. He is the personification of unrequited love and punisher of those who scorn love, and is depicted as similar to Eros in every way, but with long hair and butterfly wings. The term was also used for the love which arises in the beloved boy in a pederastic relationship.
Anteros Greek/Etruscan The son of Ares and Aphrodite in Greek mythology, given to his brother Eros, who was lonely, as a playmate. He is the personification of unrequited love and punisher of those who scorn love, and is depicted as similar to Eros in every way, but with long hair and butterfly wings. Greek/Etruscan
Anti-Christ / AntiChrist Christian Anti-Christ or the Man of Sin, expected by some to precede the second coming of Christ. St. John so calls every one who denies the incarnation of the eternal Son of God. Christian
Antiope Greece A daughter of Nycteus and Polyxo or of the river god Asopus in Boeotia. She became by Zeus the mother of Amphion and Zethus, Dionysus threw her into a state of madness on account of the vengeance which her sons had taken on Dirce. In this condition she wandered about through Greece, until Phocus, the grandson of Sisyphus, cured and married her. She was buried with Phocus in one common tomb.
Antu aka Antum Babylon/Akkadia A goddess, the first consort of Anu. They were the parents of the Anunnaki and the Utukki. Antu was replaced as consort by Ishtar or Inanna, who may also be a daughter of Anu and Antu. She is similar to Anat. Babylon/Akkadia
Anuradha Hindu/Puranic A goddess of good luck. Like her sister, Bharani, she is a daughter of Daksha and a wife of Chandra. Hindu/Puranic
Apacita Inca Guardian spirit. Represented by a pile of stones by the side of mountain passes and trails. He was invoked by travellers to safeguard their journeys. Inca
Apollo Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks, was, according to Homer, the son of Zeus and Leto. Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod 918) states the same, and adds, that Apollo's sister was Artemis. Neither of the two poets suggests anything in regard to the birth-place of the god, unless we take "born in Lycia," which, however, according to others, would only mean "born of or in light." Apollo is one of the few Greek gods who did not sleep with Aphrodite
Appias Roman A nymph of the Appian well, which was situated not far from the temple of Venus Genitrix in the forum of Julius Caesar. It was surrounded by statues of nymphs, who were called Appiades. Roman
Ard Greimme Scotland Father of the famed warrioress sister Aife and Scathach. Once a Sun God. Ireland, Scotland
Ard Greimme Scotland Means "high power" or "High sun". He is the father of the warrioress sisters Aife and Scathach Ireland/Scotland
Ardhanarit savara / Ammaiappan/ Naranari Siva & Sakti combined
Arethusa Greek One of the Nereid, and the nymph of the famous well, thus in the island of Ortygia near Syracuse. Alpheius reckons her among the Sicilian nymphs, and as the divinity who inspired pastoral poetry.
Arianrhod Wales Keeper of the circling Silver Wheel of Stars, a symbol of time and karma. Mother aspect of the Triple Goddess. Honoured at the Full Moon. Wales
Arsan Duolai Yakut/ Siberia The chief spirit of the underworld
Artemis Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks. Her name is usually derived from uninjured, healthy, vigorous; according to which she would be the goddess who is herself inviolate and vigorous, and also grants strength and health to others. According to the Homeric account and Hesiod (Theogony 918) she was the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was the sister of Apollo, and born with him at the same time in the island of Delos.
Asima Si Brazil Goddess of water and fish. Brazil
Asteria Greek A daughter of the Titan Coeus and Phoebe. She was the sister of Leto, and, according to Hesiod (Theogony 409), the wife of Perses, by whom she became the mother of Hecate.
Asteropeia Greek Two mythical personages, one a daughter of Pelias, who in conjunction with her sisters murdered her father and the second a daughter of Deion and Diomede. Greek
Astoria Ephebian Goddess of Love, held in extremely low regard by the god Om and sister to the goddess Patina. Mentioned in Small Gods and Discworld Noir.
Astypalaea Greek A daughter of Phoenix and Perimede, the daughter of Oeneus. She was a sister of Europa, and became by Poseidon the mother of the Argonaut Ancaeus and of Eurypylus, king of the island of Cos. The island Astypalaea among the Cyclades derived its name from her.
Athamas Greek A son of Aeolus and Enarete, the daughter of Deimachus. He was thus a brother of Cretheus, Sisyphus, Salmoneus, etc. (Apollodorus i)
Atseatsan Haudenosaunee First man and a solar divinity, He and his wife raise the sun up into the heavens on long poles, since it is too hot to take hold of directly. Haudenosaunee
Atthis Greek Or Attis, a daughter of Cranaus, from whom Attica, which was before called Actaea, was believed to have derived its name. The two birds into which Philomele and her sister Procne were metamorphosed, were likewise called Attis.
Atum Egypt The first god, having arisen by his own force himself, sitting on a mound (benben), from the primordial waters (Nu). Early myths state that Atum created the god Shu and goddess Tefnut from his semen by masturbation in the city of Annu. Egypt
Atunis Etruscan A god similar to Adonis
Auset Egypt Goddess of Sirius. Egypt
Azidahaka Persia A serpent with three heads, six eyes and three pairs of fangs. He was the adversary of Yima. Persia
Azrael Christian Also known as the Great Attractor and the Death of Universes, is apparently not a worshipped god on the Discworld, but he exists nonetheless, and is an entity of enormously unthinkable scope and size.
Bab Arabia The founder and prophet of Babism. He was a merchant from Shiraz, who at the age of twenty-five claimed to be the promised Qa'im (or Mihdi). After his declaration he took the title of Bab meaning "Gate". Six years later he was shot by a firing squad in Tabriz.
Bacis Greek Seems to have been originally only a common noun derived from to speak, and to have signified any prophet or speaker. In later times, however, Bacis was regarded as a proper noun, and the ancients distinguish several seers of this name. Greek
Balberith Christian Ex-prince of the Order of Cherubim, now in Hell, Grand Pontiff and Master of Ceremonies, usually the one to countersign or notarize the signatures on any pact entered into between mortals and the Devil, and so referred to a 'Scriptor of Hell.' Christian
Balmung or Gram Scandinavian The sword of Siegfried, forged by Wieland, the Vulcan of the Scandinavians. Wieland, in a trial of merit, clove Amilias, a brother smith, through steel helmet and armour, down to the waist; but the cut was so fine that Amilias was not even aware that he was wounded till he attempted to move, when he fell into two pieces. Scandinavian
Bar-Lgura Semitic A gargoyle type demon said to sit on the roofs of houses and leap on the inhabitants. People so afflicted were called d'baregara. Semitic
Barbeliots Greek A sect of Gnostics. Their first immortal son they called Barbeloth, omniscient, eternal, and incorruptible. He engendered light by the instrumentality of Christ, author of Wisdom. From Wisdom sprang Autogenes, and from Autogenes, Adam (male and female), and from Adam, matter. The first angel created was the Holy Ghost, from whom sprang the first prince, named Protarchontes, who married Arrogance, whose offspring was Sin. Burnt by the Christians
Bayard France A horse of incredible swiftness, belonging to the four sons of Aymon. If only one of the sons mounted, the horse was of the ordinary size; but if all four mounted, his body became elongated to the requisite length. The name is used for any valuable or wonderful horse, and means a "high-bay". France
Bean Sidhe Celtic A Banshee an goddess of Death.Celtic
Bean Woman Iroquoi Sister of Corn Woman and Squash Woman, she gave the Patroness and the bean vine to humanity. Iroquoi
Beda Germanic Goddess who, along with the Alaisiagae sisters and Fimmilena and Mars Thingsus was popular among the Tubantes.
Begoe Etruscan An Etruscan nymph, who was believed to have written the Ars fulguritarum, the art of purifying places which had been struck by lightning. This religious book was kept at Rome in the temple of Apollo together with the Sibylline books and the Carmina of the Marcii.
Bel Akkadian Bel became especially used of the Babylonian god Marduk and when found in Assyrian and neo-Babylonian personal names or mentioned in inscriptions in Mesoptamian context it can usually be taken as referring to Marduk and no other god. Similarly Belit without some disambiguation mostly refers to Bel Marduk's spouse Sarpanit. However Marduk's mother, the Sumerian goddess called Ninhursag, Ningal and Ninmah and other names in Sumerian, was often known as Belit-ili 'Lady of the Gods' in Akkadian.
Bel Babylonian Signifying "lord" or "master", is a title rather than a genuine name, applied to various gods in Babylonian religion. The feminine form is Belit 'Lady, Mistress'. Bel is represented in Greek and Latin by Belos and Belus respectively. Linguistically Bel is an East Semitic form cognate with Northwest Semitic Ba‘al with the same meaning.
Bellerophones Greek Or Bellerophon, properly called Hipponous, was a son of the Corinthian king Glaucus and Eurymede, and a grandson of Sisyphus. According to Hyginus, he was a son of Poseidon and Eurymede. Greek
Bellona Roman Goddess of war and mother goddess Roman the goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. She is frequently mentioned by the Roman poets as the companion of Mars, or even as his sister or his wife. Virgil describes her as armed with a bloody scourge. (The Aeneid Book VIII)
Bene Elohim Hebrew Angels who belong to the choir of thrones having the duty of forever singing the ineffable praise of God. Hebrew
Beroe Greek A Trojan woman, married to Doryclus, one of the companions of Aeneas. Iris assumed the appearance of Beroe when she persuaded the women to set fire to the ships of Aeneas on the coast of Sicily.
Bhaiarva Hindu/ Puranic A minor form of Siva
Bia Greek The personification of mighty force, is described as the daughter of the Titan Pallas and Styx, and as a sister of Zelos, Cratos, and Nice. Greek
Bidhata Purusha Hindu A god of fate and the Hindu equivalent of the Fates and the Norns. He writes the child’s future life on its forehead, on the sixth day after its birth.
Biffant France A little-known demon, chief of a legion who was said to have entered the body of Denise de la Caille and who was obliged to sign with his claws the proces verbal of exorcisms. France
Binzuru-Sonja Japan One of the pupils of Buddha, the first of the Sixteen Rakan. Rakan with grey hair and long eyebrows. Originally he was a retainer of the king, Uuten. He became a priest and attained miracle power by performing Arakan’s vow. It is said that he was praised by Shaka for he used the miracle power for the world and that he didn't enter Nirvana and made efforts cultivating ordinary people. He was worshipped on the above in Theravada Buddhism, however, many are worshipped in restaurants in China. He is enshrined in front of a temple in Japan. It is believed that stroking him eliminates distresses. Japan
Boaliri Australia The younger of the two sister goddesses that created life. The other was Waimariwi. Australia
Bona Dea Roman A Roman divinity, who is described as the sister, wife, or daughter of Faunus, and was herself called Fauna, Fatua, or Oma, worshipped at Rome from the earliest times as a chaste and prophetic divinity; and her worship was so exclusively confined to women.
Borvo British/Gaul God of hot springs equated with Apollo and has similarities to the goddess Sirona, who was also a healing deity associated with mineral springs. British/Gaul
Bower of Bliss France A Wandering Island, the enchanted residence of Acrasia, destroyed by Sir Guyon. France
Brags England Mischievous Goblins that can take the form of a cow with a white flag around its neck, an ass, or a naked man flapping a white sheet, a chanting girl, or a giant, white singing cat. England
Brahmins Hindu Their "tri-murti" is a three-headed deity, representing Brahma (as creator), Vishnu (as preserver), and Siva (as destroyer).
Brigit aka Brigid Ireland Brighit, Bridget ("exalted one") was the daughter of Dagda and wife of Bres of the Fomorians. She had two sisters, also named Brighid, and is considered a classic Celtic Triple Goddess. Ireland
Brontes Greek A blacksmith personified, one of the Cyclops. The name signifies Thunder. Greek
Bubastis Egypt A daughter of Osiris and Isis, and sister of Horus (Apollo). Her mother, Isis, entrusted Bubastis and Horns to Buto, to protect them from Typhon. Egypt
Buga Siberia/Tungus The supreme god and represents the entire universe. Siberia/Tungus
Bugady Musun Siberian Revered by many Siberian peoples. Bugady Musun was the patron of wildlife and the guardian of animals.
Bugarik Assam / Garos A lovely river siren with the body and arms of a woman, but no legs. Her head floats on the current and she will kill anyone she catches.
Bugarit British The spirit found on building sites and invoked as the cause of minor accidents. British
Bure Scandinavian The first woman, and sister of Borr, the father of Odin. Scandinavian
Burlond Britain A giant whose legs Sir Tryamour cut off. Britain
Caca Greek A sister of Cacus, who, according to some accounts, betrayed the place where the cattle were concealed which Cacus had stolen from Hercules or Recaranus. She was rewarded for it with divine honours, which she was to enjoy for ever. Greek
Cadmus Greek A son of Agenor and Telephassa, and brother of Europa, Phoenix, and Cilix. When Europa was carried off by Zeus to Crete, Agenor sent out his sons in search of their sister, enjoining them not to return without her. Telephassa accompanied her sons. All researches being fruitless, Cadmus and Telephassa settled in Thrace. Here Telephassa died, and Cadmus, after burying her, went to Delphi to consult the oracle respecting his sister. Greek
Caeculus Greek An ancient Italian hero of Praeneste. The account which Servius gives of him runs as follows: At Praeneste there were pontifices and indigetes as well as at Rome. There were however two brothers called indigetes who had a sister. Greek
Caer Ibormeith Ireland A daughter of Sid Uamuin and Prince Ethal Anbuail of Connacht. Every alternate Samhain she would change into a swan, in which form she would remain for a year before becoming human again the following Samhain. Ireland
Camilla Roman Of the Volsci was the daughter of King Metabus and Casmilla. Driven from his throne, Metabus was chased into the wilderness by armed Volsci, his infant daughter in his hands. The river Amasenus blocked his path, and, fearing for the child's welfare, Metabus bound her to a spear. He promised Diana that Camilla would be her servant, a warrior virgin. He then safely threw her to the other side, and swam across to retrieve her. Roman
Candesvari aka Candika Nepal A form of Durga or Gauri, the Consort of Siva; she is one of the astamatrka and the navadurga who destroyed her demonic offspring. Nepal
Candfrasekhara Hindu/ Puranic A form of a god Siva
Candsvera Hindu/ Puranic/ Epic A Minor God & benevolent aspect of Siva
Canola Ireland One of the oldest of the Irish deities, invented the harp from the sinews of a gutted whale. Ireland
Capricorn Roman "the centaur archer." Capricornus is the tenth, or, strictly speaking, the eleventh sign of the zodiac. (Dec. 21-Jan. 20.) According to classic mythology, Capricorn was Pan, who, from fear of the great Typhon, changed himself into a goat, and was made by Jupiter one of the signs of the zodiac. Roman
Carmilhan Baltic The phantom ship on which the Kobold of the Baltic sits when he appears to doomed vessels.
Catillus Greek There are two Catilli in Roman legend: Catillus the Arcadian, son of Amphiaraus. Catillus, his son. Catillus the Arcadian and his sons Catillus, Tiburtus and Coras escaped the slaughter at Thebes and arrived at the Aniene Plateau. They drove away the Sicilians who lived there and founded a city named Tibur (now Tivoli) in honour of Tiburtius. Greek
Celedones Greek The soothing goddesses were believed to be endowed, like the Sirens, with a magic power of song. Hephaestus was said to have made their golden images on the ceiling of the temple at Delphi. Greek
Cephalus Greek A Molossian chief, who, together with another chief, Antinous, was driven by the calumnies of Charops to take the side of Perseus, in self-defence, against the Romans. Greek
Cerberus Greek The many-headed dog that guarded the entrance of Hades, is mentioned as early as the Homeric poems, but simply as " the dog," and without the name of Cerberus. Greek
Ceto Greek A hideous aquatic monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. She was the personification of the dangers of the sea, unknown terrors and bizarre creatures. Eventually, the word "ceto" became simple shorthand for any sea monster. Greek
Chakora Hindu A fabulous bird, similar to a partridge that lives upon the beams of the moon. Hindu
Chang Sien Chinese A divinity worshipped by women desirous of offspring. Chinese
Charun Etruscan The Etruscan demon of death who torments the souls of the deceased in the underworld and guards its entrance to the underworld. Similar to the Greek Charon, is portrayed with the nose of a vulture, pointed ears, winged, holding a hammer, with which he finished off his victims.
Charybdis and Scylla Greek The names of two rocks between Italy and Sicily, and only a short distance from one another. In the midst of the one of these rocks which was nearest to Italy, there dwelt, according to Homer, Scylla, a daughter of Crataeis, a fearful monster, barking like a dog, with twelve feet, six long necks and mouths, each of which contained three rows of sharp teeth. Greek
Chebeldei Siberia These are the inhabitants of lower world
Chiminagua Chibcha Another omni-potent god that created the earth in a rather simple matter
Chione Greek A daughter of Boreas and Oreithyia, and sister of Cleopatra, Zetes, and Calais. She became by Poseidon the mother of Eumolpus, and in order to conceal the event, she threw the boy into the sea; but the child was saved by Poseidon. Greek
Chloris Greek A daughter of the Theban Amphion and Niobe. According to an Argive tradition, her original name was Meliboea, and she and her brother Amyclas were the only children of Niobe that were not killed by Apollo and Artemis. But the terror of Chloris at the death of her brothers and sisters was so great, that she turned perfectly white, and was therefore called Chloris. Greek
Cholmus Siberia Creator of animals Siberia
Cihuacoatl Aztec She is a goddess whose roaring signaled war
Cinei Chukchi/ Siberia A sea goddess
Cinei-new Siberia/Chukchee A sea goddess and wife of Peruten, god of the sea. Siberia/Chukchee
Circe Greek A mythical sorceress, whom Homer calls a fair-locked goddess, a daughter of Helios by the oceanid Perse, and a sister of Aeetes. Greek
Clytemnestra Greek A daughter of Tyndareus and Leda, and sister of Castor, Timandra, and Philonoe, and half-sister of Polydeuces and Helena. She was married to Agamemnon. Greek
Cock of Heaven Crow Mahomet found in the first heaven a cock of such enormous size that its crest touched the second heaven. The crowing of this celestial bird arouses every living creature from sleep except man. The Moslem doctors say that Allah lends a willing ear to him who reads the Koran, to him who prays for pardon, and to the cock whose chant is divine melody. When this cock ceases to crow, the day of judgment will be at hand.
Coronus Greek 1. A son of Apollo by Chrysorthe, father of Corax and Lamedon, and king of Sicyon. 2. A son of Thersander, grandson of Sisyphus, and founder of Coroneia. 3. A son of Caeneus, was a prince of the Lapithae, and father of Leonteus and Lyside. He was slain by Heracles. (Apollodorus. ii) 4. The father of the Argonaut Caeneus. (Apollodorus i. Argonautica) Greek
Corpse Bird Whales "derwyn corph" the phantom of a bird that sits on a windowsill and taps on the glass when someone is about to die. Whales
Crone Ireland Third aspect of the Triple goddess. She signifies old age or death, winter, the end of all things, the waning moon, post-mentrual phases of women's lives. Ireland
Cyane Greek A Sicilian nymph and playmate of Proserpina, who was changed through grief at the loss of Proserpina into a well. Greek
Cymidei Cymeinfoll Welsh Cymidei Cymeinfoll (big belly of battle), was a goddess of the Mabinogi. Cymidei gave birth to one fully-formed and armed warrior every six weeks. Welsh
Cymochles British A man of prodigious might, brother of Pyrochles, son of Malice (Acrates) and Despite, and husband of Acrasia, the enchantress. He sets out to encounter Sir Guyen, but is ferried over the idle lake by Wantonness (Ph?'dria), and forgets himself; he is slain by King Arthur. British
Cyparissus Greek A youth of Cea, a son of Telephus, was beloved by Apollo and Zephyrus or Silvanus. When he had inadvertently killed his favourite stag, he was seized with immoderate grief, and metamorphosed into a cypress. Greek
Da Dahomey The rainbow serpent, "the symbol of flowing, sinuous movement" is of a dual nature, male and female. The Fon, Dahomey
Daeira Greek "the knowing," a divinity connected with the Eleusinian mysteries. A daughter of Oceanus, and became by Hermes the mother of Eleusis but others called her a sister of Styx. Greek
Daffodil Greek/Roman Or "Lent Lily," was once white; but Persephone, daughter of Demeter, delighted to wander about the flowery meadows of Sicily. One spring, throwing herself on the grass, she fell asleep. The god of the Infernal Regions, Pluto, fell in love with the beautiful maid, and carried her off for his bride. His touch turned the white flowers to a golden yellow, and some of them fell in Acheron, where they grew luxuriantly; and ever since the flower has been planted on graves. Greek/Roman
Daiboth Japanese A Japanese idol of colossal size. Each of her hands is full of hands.
Daikoku Japan God of wealth and happiness and one of the Seven Gods of Fortune. The god invoked specially by the artisans of Japan. He sits on a ball of rice, holding a hammer in his hand, with which he beats a sack; and every time he does so the sack becomes full of silver, rice, cloth, and other useful articles. Japan
Dala Kadavara Singhalese Elephant goddess who brings diseases and misfortune. Singhalese
Danaides Greek Daughters of Danaus. They were fifty in number, and married the fifty sons of ?gyptos. They all but one murdered their husbands on their wedding-night, and were punished in the infernal regions by having to draw water everlastingly in sieves from a deep well.
Danhyang Desa Java Each village has a Danhyang Desa which is a spirit who lives in a large tree near to or in the village. All blessings emanate from him. Any disasters occurring to the village are seen as a sign that he has been neglected.
Dano Indian An Indian demon who is similar to the Bir.
Daphnis Greek A Sicilian hero, to whom the invention of bucolic poetry is ascribed. He is called a son of Hermes by a nymph, or merely the beloved of Hermes. Ovid calls him an Idaean shepherd; but it does not follow from this that Ovid connected him with either the Phrygian or the Cretan Ida, since Ida signifies any woody mountain. Greek
Deianeira Greek A daughter of Althaea by Oeneus, Dionysus, or Dexamenus (Apollodorus i), and a sister of Meleager. Greek
Deiphobe Greek A daughter of the seer Glaucus and one of the Cumaean Sibyls. (Aeneid Book IV) Greek
Dekla Latvia One of a trinity of fate goddesses that included her sisters Karta and Laima. Latvia
Delias Greek The sacred vessel made by Theseus and sent annually from Athens to Delos. This annual festival lasted 30 days, during which no Athenian could be put to death, and as Socrates was condemned during this period his death was deferred till the return of the sacred vessel. The ship had been so often repaired that not a stick of the original vessel remained at the time, yet was it the identical ship. So the body changes from infancy to old age, and though no single particle remains constant, yet the man 6 feet high is identical with his infant body a span long. Greek
Demo Greek A name of Demeter. It also occurs as a proper name of other mythical beings, such as the Cumaean Sibyl and a daughter of Celeus and Metaneira, who, together with her sisters, kindly received Demeter at the well Callichoros in Attica. Greek
Dendritis Greek The goddess of the tree, occurs as a surname of Helen at Rhodes, and the following story is related to account for it. After the death of Menelaus, Helen was driven from her home by two natural sons of her husband. She fled to Rhodes, and sought the protection of her friend Polyxo, the widow of Tlepolemus. But Polyxo bore Helen a grudge, since her own husband Tlepolemus had fallen a victim in the Trojan war. Accordingly, once while Helen was bathing, Polyxo sent out her servants in the disguise of the Erinnyes, with the command to hang Helen on a tree.
Deo Qui Vias Et Semitas Britain Deo Qui Vias Et Semitas Commentus Est. 'The God who Invented Roads and Pathways' is mentioned on a single altarstone in Britain.
Descended into hell Greek Means the place of the dead. (Anglo-Saxon, helan, to cover or conceal, like the Greek "Hades," the abode of the dead, from the verb a-cido, not to see. In both cases it means "the unseen world" or "the world concealed from sight." The god of this nether world was called "Hades" by the Greeks, and "Hel" or "Hela" by the Scandinavians. In some counties of England to cover in with a roof is "to hell the building," and thatchers or tilers are termed "helliers."
Devi Hindu The consort of Siva and daughter of Himavat, the Himalaya Mountains. As the female energy of Siva she considered either as a beneficent or as a malignant deity. Hindu
Dewden aka Dedun Nubian A Nubian god worshipped since at least 2400BC. There is much uncertainty about his original nature, especially since he was depicted as a lion, but the earliest known information indicates that he had become a god of incense.
Dhavajagrakeyura Buddhist Goddess who sits on a sun throne Buddhist/Mahayana
Dhurjati Hindu God, a manifestation of Siva Hindu/Puranic/Epic
Dice Greek The personification of justice, was, according to Hesiod, a daughter of Zeus and Themis, and the sister of Eunomia and Eirene. She was considered as one of the Horae; she watched the deeds of man, and approached the throne of Zeus with lamentations whenever a judge violated justice. Greek
Dirona aka Sirona Gaul Serona, Sarona, Dirona, Sthirona. The Star Goddess of Gaul
Div Turkish A giant demon or a fiend of gigantic size, and ugly, really ugly. Turkish
Djanggau / Djunkgao Australian Djanggau with Her sister Djunkgao, are dual fertility goddess who brought forth all life in the beginning. Australian
Dodona Greece A famous oracle in Epiros, and the most ancient of Greece. It was dedicated to Zeus, and situated in the village of Dodona.
Doh Yenisi Siberia a rather good magician that could fly over the waves, become weary, then create islands to rest on, almost god like
Dorothea Greek Represented with a rose-branch in her hand, a wreath of roses on her head, and roses with fruit by her side; sometimes with an angel carrying a basket with three apples and three roses. The legend is that Theophilus, the judge's secretary, scoffingly said to her, as she was going to execution, "Send me some fruit and roses, Dorothea, when you get to Paradise." Immediately after her execution, while Theophilus was at dinner with a party of companions, a young angel brought to him a basket of apples and roses, saying, "From Dorothea, in Paradise," and vanished.
Dove Christian In Christian art, symbolises the Holy Ghost. In church windows the seven rays proceeding from the dove signify the seven gifts of the Holy Ghost. It also symbolises the human soul, and as such is represented coming out of the mouth of saints at death.
Dragon Christian Dragon in Christian art symbolises Satan or sin. In the pictures of St. Michael and St. Margaret it typifies their conquest over sin. Similarly, when represented at the feet of Christ and the Virgin Mary. The conquest of St. George and St. Silvester over a dragon means their triumph over paganism. In the pictures of St. Martha it means the inundation of the Rhone, spreading pestilence and death; similarly, St. Romanus delivered Rouen from the inundation of the Seine, and Apollo's conquest of the python means the same thing. St. John the Evangelist is sometimes represented holding a chalice, from which a winged dragon is issuing.
Draupner or Draupnir Norse Odin's ring from which every ninth night dropped eight rings equal in size and beauty to itself. It was put on Balder's funeral-pile. Skirner offered it to Gerd. Norse
Duma aka Dumah Egypt The angel of Egypt and the angel of silence and who appeared to terrified the Israelites as they departed Egypt with Moses.
Dun Cow Britain The dun cow of Dunsmore heath was a savage beast slain by Sir Guy, Earl of Warwick. A huge tusk, probably that of an elephant, is still shown at Harwich Castle as one of the horns of the dun-cow. The fable is that this cow belonged to a giant, and was kept on Mitchell Fold (middle fold), Shropshire. Its milk was inexhaustible; but one day an old woman who had filled her pail, wanted to fill her sieve also. This so enraged the cow, that she broke loose from the fold and wandered to Dunsmore heath, where she was slain by Guy of Warwick. Britain
Dunne Siberia Goddess of the sky, fire and who ruled over the clan territory Siberia/Tungus