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God Name and Meaning

List of Gods : "Aboriginal"
NameOriginDescription
God Name: Jar'Edo Wens Australian A god of earthly knowledge and physical might, created by Altjira to ensure that people did not get too arrogant or self-conceited. He is associated with victory and intelligence. Australian aboriginal
God Name: Julana Jumu A lecherous spirit who surprises women by burrowing beneath the sand. He was alive, and wandered the Earth with his father, Njirana, during the Dreamtime. Jumu, Australian aboriginal
God Name: Kunmanngur Australia Is a serpent from an Aboriginal tale, "The Flood and the Bird Men", told by Kianoo Tjeemairee of the Murinbata tribe. There are many names for the Rainbow Serpent in Aboriginal mythology, depending on location and language. It is a powerful symbol of fertility and creation. Australia
God Name: Waramurungundi Australian The first woman. Australian Aboriginal
God Name: Wati-kutjara Australian Lizard men. Australian Aboriginal
God Name: Wawalag Greek Sisters who were daughters of Djanggawul. Australian Aboriginal
God Name: Wollunqua Australia A snake-god of rain and fertility. Australian Aboriginal
God Name: Wondjina Australia Cloud and rain spirits. Australian Aboriginal
God Name: Wuluwaid Australia A rain god. Australian Aboriginal
God Name: Wuragag Australia First man. Australian Aboriginal
God Name: Wuriupranili Australia Solar goddess who carries a torch that is the sun. Australian Aboriginal
God Name: Wurrunna Australia A culture hero. Australian Aboriginal
God Name: Zara-ma-yha-who Aboriginal A little red man, about 4 feet tall, with a large head and mouth. The tips of the fingers and toes were shaped like the suckers of an octopus. They lived in wild fig trees and capture their prey by dropping on passers-by. A Zara-ma-yha-who might jump on top of the person and drain their blood with their hands and feet. Their victims rarely died from the initial encounter, but because the person was left in a weak and helpless state, the yara-ma-yha-who would return later and swallow the victim. It then drank water and took a nap. When it awoke, it would regurgitate the undigested portion of its meal, which, if the meal was a person, that person would still be alive. Aboriginal