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List of Gods : "Ac"
NameOriginDescription
A / Aa, Sirdu, Sirrida Akkadia / Semitic A (also Aa, Sirdu, Sirrida). Moon Goddess of Chaldeans. Symbolized by a disk with eight rays, this figure is frequently associated with goddesses of light across many cultures including Babylon, Mesopotamia, Akkadia and Semitic.
Abdals Islamic In Islamic lore, the 'substitutes', 70 mysterious spirits whose identities are known only to God alone, "When one of those entities dies another is secretly appointed in replacement' and it is through the operations and actions of these creatures that the world continues to exist.
Abel and Cain Islam Cain was born with a twin sister who was named Aclima, and Abel with a twin sister named Jumella. Adam wished Cain to marry Abel's twin sister, and Abel to marry Cain's. Cain would not consent to this arrangement, and Adam proposed to refer the question to God by means of a sacrifice. God rejected Cain's sacrifice to signify his disapproval of his marriage with Aclima, his twin sister, and Cain slew his brother in a fit of jealousy. Islam
Abhijnaraja Buddhist/Tibet A physician god. He is accounted among a series of medicine buddhas and typically depicted with stretched earlobes, and color is red. Buddhist/Tibet
Ac Yanto Mayan Created European immigrants and their products. Mayan
Acacia Egypt Acacia-wood was held in ancient times to be the "Wood of Life" and sacred to the sun god of Egypt.
Academus Greek A hero of Attica. He told Castor and Pollux where Theseus had hidden Helen. He is sometimes identified with Cadmus. Greek
Acala India/ Buddhism This god is protector of of the teaching & defends temples
Acala aka Achala Buddhist/India Acala, is the best known of the Five Wisdom Kings of the Womb Realm. Acala means "The Immovable One" in Sanskrit. Acala is also the name of the eighth of the ten stages of the path to buddhahood. Acala is the destroyer of delusion and the protector of Buddhism. Buddhist/India
Acamas Greek One of the Cyclops. Greek
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Acar Enochian A minor angel ruled by Rzionr Nrzfm. Enochian
Acastus Greek A son of Pelias, king of lolcus, and of Anaxibia, or as others call her, Philomache.
Acat Mayan God of tattoo artists. Mayan
Acaviser aka Achvizr Etruscan Akhvizr, Akhuviztr, Goddess, one of the Lasas, the Etruscan Fate-Goddesses who include Alpan, Evan and Mean. Etruscan
Acaviser/ Lasas Etruscan A goddess, one of the fates
Acca Roman A goddess associated with Hercules
Acca Larentia Etruscan A mythical woman who occurs in the stories in early Roman history. Associated with Hercules she was a goddess of the earth and goddess of winter Roman/Etruscan
Acca Laurentia Roman Or Larentia, a mythical woman who occurs in the stories in early Roman history.
Accasbel Ireland A Partholan who is credited with making the first tavern in Ireland. Most likely was an early God of wine or meade. Rules over the vine harvest, Beltane's blessing of the meade. Ireland
Acchupta Jain One of the sixteen Mahavidyas in the Jaina pantheon. Jain
Acco Greek A goddess of Evil
According to others Greek She was a daughter of Helios and Amphitrite, or of Poseidon and Aphrodite, lastly of Oceanus. Greek
Acephali Libya A fabulous race of people, reported by ancient writers to have had no heads. Libya
Acestes Roman A son of the Sicilian river-god Crimisus and of a Trojan woman of the name of Egesta or Segesta
Achaeus Greek A son of Xuthus and Creusa, and consequently a brother of Ion and grandson of Hellen. Greek
Achaiah Christian The angel into serenity, patience, tranquility and the secrets of nature. Christian
Achelois Greek A moon goddess
Achelous Greece The god of the river Achelous which was the greatest, and according to tradition, the most ancient among the rivers of Greece.
Acheri Indian They are the ghosts of little girls, who live on the tops of mountains but descend at night to hold their revels in more convenient places. Indian
Acheron Greek Acheron a son of Helios and Gaea or Demeter, and was changed into the river bearing his name in the lower world, because he had refreshed the Titans with drink during their contest with Zeus.
Achilles Greek The son of Peleus, king of the Myrmidones in Phthiotis, in Thessaly, and of the Nereid Thetis.
Achiroe Greek According to Apollodorus ii Anchinoe, which is perhaps a mistake for Anchiroe, was a daughter of Nilus, and the wife of Belus, by whom she became the mother of Aegyptus and Danaus.
Achiyalatopa Zuni Celestial giant monster with feathers of flint knives. Zuni
Achlae/ Aclelous/ Acleloos/ Achelous Greek A river god of some standing in the community
Achle Etruscan Legendary hero of the Trojan War, from the Greek Achilles. Etruscan
Achlys Greek According to some ancient cosmogonies, the eternal night, and the first created being which existed even before Chaos. According to Hesiod, she was the personification of misery and sadness, and as such she was represented on the shield of Heracles: pale, emaciated, and weeping, with chattering teeth, swollen knees, long nails on her fingers, bloody cheeks, and her shoulders thickly covered with dust.
Achor Cyrenea God of flies, worshipped by the Cyreneans, that they might not be annoyed with these tiny tormentors.
Achtland Celtic Goddess queen who no mortal man could sexually satisfy, so she took a giant from the faery realm as her mate. Celtic
Acis Greek According to Ovid (Metamorphoses I) a son of Faunus and Symaethis.
Aclahayr Greek Of the fourth hour of the Nuctemeron, the genius spirit.
Aclla Inca/Quechua Goddesses of war and virgins comparable to the Roman Vestal Virgins. Inca/Quechua
Acmbicu Enochian A senior of Air associated with Mercury. Enochian
Acmonian Wood Greek The trystplace of unlawful love. It was here that Mars had his assignation with Harmonia, who became the mother of the Amazons.
Acna Mayan Mother goddess Mayan
Acna/ Akna Maya/ Mexico A mother goddess
Acolmiztli Aztec Minor chthonic underworld god. Aztec
Acolnahuacatl Aztec Another minor chthonic underworld god
Acoran Gran Canary/ Canary Is The supreme Being who really really likes milk
Acps Enochian A minor angel. Enochian
Acraea Greek A daughter of the river-god Asterion near Mycenae, who together with her sisters Euboea and Prosymna acted as nurses to Hera.
Acragas Greek A son of Zeus and the Oceanid Asterope
Acrar Enochian A minor angel. Enochian
Acrasia Britain Self-indulgence. An enchantress who lived in the "Bower of Bliss," situate in "Wandering Island" She transformed her lovers into monstrous shapes, and kept them captives. Sir Guyon having crept up softly, threw a net over her, and bound her in chains of adamant; then broke down her bower and burnt it to ashes. Britain.
Acrisius Greek A mythical king of Argos, and a son of Abas and Ocalea (or Aglaea, depending on the author). He quarrelled constantly with his twin brother Proetus, inventing bucklers in the process, and in the end expelled him to Tiryns.
Actaea Greek A daughter of Nereus and Doris. Greek
Actaeon Greek Son of Aristaeus and Autonoe, a daughter of Cadmus. He was trained in the art of hunting by the centaur Cheiron, and was afterwards torn to pieces by his own 50 hounds on mount Cithaeron. The names of these hounds are given by Ovid (Metamorphoses III) and Hyginus.
Actaeus Greek A son of Erisichthon, and the earliest king of Attica. He had three daughters, Agraulos, Herse, and Pandrosus, and was succeeded by Cecrops. Greek
Actiacus Greek A surname of Apollo, derived from Actium, one of the principal places of his worship. Greek
Actor Greek Son of Aristaeus and Autonoe, a daughter of Cadmus. He was trained in the art of hunting by the centaur Cheiron, and was afterwards torn to pieces by his own 50 hounds on mount Cithaeron. The names of these hounds are given by Ovid (Metamorphoses III) and Hyginus.
Acuca Enochian A minor angel. Enochian
Acups Enochian A minor angel. Enochian
Aczinor Enochian A senior of Earth associated with Jupiter. Enochian
Adam was buried Arabia According to Arabian tradition, on Aboucais, a mountain of Arabia.
Adamastor Greek The spirit of the stormy Cape (Good Hope), described by Camoens in the Lusiad as a hideous phantom. According to Barreto, he was one of the giants who invaded heaven.
Adaran Greek According to the Parsee superstition, is a sacred fire less holy than that called Behram
Adonis Assyria A son of Cinyras and Medarme, according to Hesiod a son of Phoenix and Alphesiboea, and according to the cyclic poet Panyasis, a son of Tlieias, king of Assyria, who begot him by his own daughter Smyrna. (Myrrha.)
Aegeus Greek According to some accounts a son of Pandion II. king of Athens, and of Pylia, while others call him a son of Scyrius or Phemius, and state that he was only an adopted son of Pandion.
Aeshma Persian A small hairy demon able to make men perform cruel acts. One of seven archangels of the Persians. Persian
Aesymnetes Greek A surname of Dionysus, which signifies the Lord, or Ruler, and under which he was worshipped at Aroe in Achaia. Greek
Aether Greek Ether or Acmon, a personified idea of the mythical cosmogonies
Aetna Roman A Sicilian nymph, and according to Alcimus, a daughter of Uranus and Gaea, or of Briareus. Simonides said that she had acted as arbitrator between Hephaestus and Demeter respecting the possession of Sicily.
Agenor Libya A son of Poseidon and Libya, king of Phoenicia, and twin-brother of Belus. (Apollod. ii. 1. § 4.) He married Telephassa, by whom he became the father of Cadmus, Phoenix, Cylix, Thasus, Phineus, and according to some of Europa also. 2 3 4 5 6
Agla Hebrew An acronymic, representing the Hebrew phrase: "Ateh Gibor le-Olam Adonai", ie. "Thou art mighty forever,O Lord". Often found in magical or Qabalistic texts.
Agrat Bat Mahalat Semitic Goddess known for her role as sexual temptress and seductress. According to the Talmud, she is the "spirit of uncleanness". Semitic
Agraulos Greek A daughter of Actaeus, the first king of Athens. By her husband, Cecrops, she became the mother of Erysichthon, Agraulos, Herse, and Pandrosos. 2. A daughter of Cecrops and Agraulos, and mother of Alcippe by Ares.
Agrotes Phonecian Lesser God of the earth, horses, hunting, and wanderers. Appears as a charioteer, sometimes accompanied by packs of dogs. Phonecian
Ah Can Cum/ Acaum Maya A hunter & protector of the animals god
Airapadam Indian The white elephant, one of the eight which, according to Indian mythology, sustain the earth.
Airi Indian The ghost of someone who killed in hunting. Those who see him face to face are burnt by the flash of his eye, or are torn to pieces by his dogs, or have their livers extracted and eaten by the fairies who accompany him. Indian
Aius Locutius Gallic Loquens, was a Roman numen associated with the Gallic invasions of the early 4th century. In 390 BC, the Gauls moved in the direction of Rome. According to Roman folklore, a Roman named Caedicius kept hearing a disembodied nocturnal voice at the base of the Palatine hill in the Forum Romanum. The voice warned Caedicius of the oncoming attack and recommended that the walls of Rome be fortified.
Alcmene Greek A daughter of Electryon, king of Messene, by Anaxo, the daughter of Alcaeus. According to other accounts her mother was called Lysidice or Eurydice.
Alope Greek A daughter of Cercyon, who was beloved by Poseidon on account of her great beauty, and became by him the mother of a son, whom she exposed immediately after his birth.
Althaea Greek A daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius and Eurythemis, and sister of Lecla, Hypermnestra, Iphiclus, Euippus, etc. She was married to Oeneus, king of Calydon, by whom she became the mother of Troxeus, Thyreus, Clymenus, and Meleager, and of two daughters, Gorge and Deianeira. (Apollodorus i) Apollodorus states, that according to some, Meleager was regarded as the fruit of her intercourse with Ares, and that she was mother of Deianeira by Dionysus.
Aluelp Greek An Indian nymph, who was passionately loved by Dionysus, but could not be induced to yield to his wishes, until the god changed himself into a tiger, and thus compelled her by fear to allow him to carry her across the river Sollax, which from this circumstance received the name of Tigris. Greek
Ambrosia Greek In ancient mythology, Ambrosia is sometimes the food, sometimes the drink, of the gods. The word has generally been derived from Greek a- ("not") and mbrotos ("mortal"); hence the food or drink of the immortals. Thetis anointed the infant Achilles with ambrosia and passed the child through the fire to make him immortal - a familiar Phoenician custom - but Peleus, appalled, stopped her.
Ame-No-Toko-Tachi-No-Kami Japan Heavenly deity, the fifth deity formed, who is interpreted as "Eternal Law, which is formless, but acts upon existing matter." Japan/Shinto
Amitabha Buddhist/India A celestial buddha described in the scriptures of the Mahayana school of Buddhism. According to these scriptures, Amitabha possesses infinite merits resulting from good deeds over countless past lives as a bodhisattva named Dharmakara. Buddhist/India
Amphictyon Greek A son of Deucalion and Pyrrha or according to others an autochthon, who after having married Cranae, the daughter of Cranaus, king of Attica, expelled his father-in-law from his kingdom and usurped his throne. He ruled for twelve years, and was then in turn expelled by Erichthomus.
Amphidamas Greek A son of Lycurgus and Cleophile, and father of Antimache, who married Eurystheus. (Apollodorus iii) According to Pausanias and Apollonius Rhodius (Argonautica) he was a son of Aleus, and consequently a brother of Lycurgus, Cepheus, and Auge, and took part in the expedition of the Argonauts.
Amphilochus Greek A son of Amphiaraus and Eriphyle, and brother of Alcmaeon. (Apollodorus iii) When his father went against Thebes, Amphiloehus was, according to Pausanias, yet an infant, although ten years afterwards he is mentioned as one of the Epigoni, and according to some traditions assisted his brother in the murder of his mother.
Amphitrite Greek According to Hesiod (Theogony) and Apollodorus a Nereid, though in other places Apollodorus calls her an Oceanid. She is represented as the wife of Poseidon and the goddess of the sea (the Mediterranean), and she is therefore a kind of female Poseidon.
Amymone Greek One of the daughters of Danaus and Elephantis. When Danaus arrived in Argos, the country, according to the wish of Poseidon, who was indignant at Inachus, was suffering from a drought, and Danaus sent out Amymone to fetch water.
Anaxibia Greek 1. A daughter of Bias and wife of Pelias, by whom she became the mother of Acastus, Peisidice, Pelopia, Hippothoe, and Alcestis. (Apollodorus) 2. A daughter of Cratieus, and second wife of Nestor. (Apollodorus) 3. A daughter of Pleisthenes, and sister of Agamemnon, married Strophius and became the mother of Pylades.
Andromache Greek A daughter of Eetion, king of the Cilician Thebae, and one of the noblest and most amiable female characters in the Iliad. Her father and her seven brothers were slain by Achilles at the taking of Thebae, and her mother, who had purchased her freedom by a large ransom, was killed by Artemis. Greek
Angel-year Greek According to Cornelius Agrippa and other occult philosophers, the year of an angel is 365 mortal years.
Angels of Vengeance Greek Twelve angels among the first formed at Creation, although according to official Catholic doctrine, all angels were formed simultaneously. Only five are mentioned by name: Saten'el, Michael, Uriel, Rappheal and Nathan'el.
Angelus Greek A surname of Artemis, according to some accounts the original name of Hecate.
Angerona Roman Goddess of anguish, secrecy, silence and the winter solstice. According to one class of passages she is the goddess of anguish and fear, that is, the goddess who not only produces this state of mind, but also relieves men from it. Roman
Angoulaffre French Angoulaffre of the Broken Teeth. His face measured 3 feet across; his nose was 9 inches long; his arms and legs were each 6 feet; his fingers 6 inches and 2 lines; his enormous mouth was armed with sharp pointed yellow tusks. He was descended from Goliath. French
Aningan Inuit The moon, brother to the sun whom Moon chases across the sky. Aningan has a great igloo in the sky where he rests. Irdlirvirissong, his demon cousin, lives there as well. The moon is a great hunter, and his sledge is always piled high with seal skins and meat. Inuit
Antiope Greece A daughter of Nycteus and Polyxo or of the river god Asopus in Boeotia. She became by Zeus the mother of Amphion and Zethus, Dionysus threw her into a state of madness on account of the vengeance which her sons had taken on Dirce. In this condition she wandered about through Greece, until Phocus, the grandson of Sisyphus, cured and married her. She was buried with Phocus in one common tomb.
Aonian Greek Poetical, pertaining to the Muses. The Muses, according to Grecian mythology, dwelt in Aonia, that part of Boetia which contains Mount Helicon and the Muses' Fountain. Greek
Apheidas Greek A son of Arcas by Leaneira, or according to others, by Meganeira, Chrysopeleia, or Erato.
Aphrodite Greek One of the great Olympian divinities, according to the popular and poetical notions of the Greeks, the goddess of love and beauty. Some traditions stated that she had sprung from the foam of the sea, which had gathered around the mutilated parts of Uranus, that had been thrown into the sea by Cronus after he had unmanned his father. (Theogony of Hesiod)
Apollo Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks, was, according to Homer, the son of Zeus and Leto. Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod 918) states the same, and adds, that Apollo's sister was Artemis. Neither of the two poets suggests anything in regard to the birth-place of the god, unless we take "born in Lycia," which, however, according to others, would only mean "born of or in light." Apollo is one of the few Greek gods who did not sleep with Aphrodite
Aqhat Phonecian Mortal and hero, handsome and favoured of the gods, who gave him a divine bow. Anat coveted it and had her henchman Yatpan kill him for it, but the bow was destroyed in the act. Phonecian
Arariel Jewish An angel who, according to the rabbis of the Talmud, takes charge of the waters of the earth. Fishermen invoke him so that they may take large fish. Arariel has also traditionally been invoked as a cure for stupidity. Jewish
Ares Greek The god of war and one of the great Olympian gods of the Greeks. He is represented as the son of Zeus and Hera. A later tradition, according to which Hera conceived Ares by touching a certain flower, appears to be an imitation of the legend about the birth of Hephaestus, and is related by Ovid.
Arete Greek The wife of Alcinous, king of the Phaeacians. In the Odyssey she appears as a noble and active superintendent of the household of her husband, and when Odysseus arrived in the island, he first applied to queen Arete to obtain hospitable reception and protection. Respecting her connexion with the story of Jason and Medeia.
Arete Greek The wife of Alcinous, king of the Phaeacians. In the Odyssey she appears as a noble and active superintendent of the household of her husband, and when Odysseus arrived in the island, he first applied to queen Arete to obtain hospitable reception and protection. Respecting her connexion with the story of Jason and Medeia, see Alcinous. Greek
Argonautae Greek The heroes and demigods who, according to the traditions of the Greeks, undertook the first bold maritime expedition to Colchis, a far distant country on the coast of the Euxine, for the purpose of fetching the golden fleeces. They derived their name from the ship Argo, in which the voyage was made, and which was constructed by Argus at the command of Jason, the leader of the Argonauts.
Aristaeus Greece An ancient divinity worshipped in various parts of Greece, as in Thessaly, Ceos, and Boeotia, but especially in the islands of the Aegean, Ionian, and Adriatic seas, which had once been inhabited by Pelasgians. He is described either as a son of Uranus and Ge, or according to a more general tradition, as the son of Apollo by Cyrene, the grand-daughter of Peneius.
Arsinoe Grek A daughter of Phegeus, and wife of Alcmaeon. As she disapproved of the murder of Alcmaeon, the sons of Phegeus put her into a chest and carried her to Tegea, where they accused her of having killed Alcmaeon herself.
Artemis Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks. Her name is usually derived from uninjured, healthy, vigorous; according to which she would be the goddess who is herself inviolate and vigorous, and also grants strength and health to others. According to the Homeric account and Hesiod (Theogony 918) she was the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was the sister of Apollo, and born with him at the same time in the island of Delos.
Asalluha Babylon/Akkadia/Sumeria Minor god who acts as a messenger and reporter to Enki. Babylon/Akkadia/Sumeria
Asia Greek 1. A surname of Athena in Colchis. Her worship was believed to have been brought from thence by Castor and Polydeuces to Laconia, where a temple was built to her at Las. 2. A daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, who became by Japetus the mother of Atlas, Prometheus, and Epimetheus. (Theogony of Hesiod 359.) According to some traditions the continent of Asia derived its name from her.
Asopus Greek The god of the river Asopus, was a son of Oceanus and Tethys, or according to others, of Poseidon and Pero, of Zeus and Eurynome, or lastly of Poseidon and Cegluse.
Asteria Greek A daughter of the Titan Coeus and Phoebe. She was the sister of Leto, and, according to Hesiod (Theogony 409), the wife of Perses, by whom she became the mother of Hecate.
Ate Greek According to Hesiod (Theogony), a daughter of Eris, and, according to Homer, of Zeus, was an ancient Greek divinity, who led both gods and men to rash and inconsiderate actions and to suffering.
Athena Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks. Homer calls her a daughter of Zeus, without any allusion to her mother or to the manner in which she was called into existence, while most of the later traditions agree in stating that she was born from the head of Zeus. According to the Theogony of Hesiod, Metis, the first wife of Zeus, was the mother of Athena, but when Metis was pregnant with her, Zeus, on the advice of Gaea and Uranus, swallowed Metis up, and afterwards gave birth himself to Athena, who sprang from his head.
Atlas Greek According to Hesiod (Theogony 507), a son of Japetus and Clymene, and a brother of Menoetius, Prometheus, and Epimetheus. According to Apollodorus his mother's name was Asia and, according to Hyginus, he was a son of Aether and Gaia.
Atthis Greek Or Attis, a daughter of Cranaus, from whom Attica, which was before called Actaea, was believed to have derived its name. The two birds into which Philomele and her sister Procne were metamorphosed, were likewise called Attis.
Auge Greek Princess of Arkadia and a priestess of Athena, who birthed her illegitimate son within the sacred precincts of the goddess. As punishment for the sacriligeous act, Athena made the land barren until the king had the girl exiled and sold into slavery. Greek
Augeas Greek A son of Phorbas and Hermione, and king of the Epeians in Elis. According to some accounts he was a son of Eleios or Helios or Poseidon.
Auriel Christian The archangel of alchemy and vision, the tallest of the archangels with eyes that can see across eternity and the ability to let you into the fairy kingdoms. Christian
Autolycus Greek A son of Hermes or Daedalion by Chione, Philonis, or Telauge. He was the husband of Neaera, or according to Homer, of Amphithea, by whom he became the father of Anticleia, the mother of Odysseus and Aesimus.
Autonoe Greek A daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, was the wife of Aristaeus, by whom she became the mother of Polydorus. (Theogony of Hesiod) According to Apollodorus (Apollodorus iii), Polydorus was a brother of Autonoe, and Actaeon was her son.
Auxo 1 Greek One of the Horae. 2. An ancient Attic divinity, who was worshipped, according to Pausanias, together with Hegemone, under the name of Charites
Ayya Vaikundar Tamil According to Akilattirattu Ammanai, a scripture of the Ayyavazhi, was an avatar of Narayana. As per the Ayyavazhi mythology the body in which Ayya Vaikundar incarnated is that of Mudisoodum Perumal. Tamil
Azeus Greek A son of Clymenus of Orchomenos, father of Actor and grandfather of Astyoche. He went with his brothers against Thebes, to take vengeance for the murder of his father, who had been slain by the Thebans at a festival of the Onchestian Poseidon. Greek
Baile Ireland Baile of the Honeyed Speech, God of Blarney. Rules over quick and clear thinking, speeches, ideas, impressing someone, mental activity, speaking, protection for lovers, blessing magic wands. Ireland
Balius and Xanthus Greek The immortal horses of Achilles. They were sons of Zephyrus and the Harpy Podarge.
Baltazo France One of the demons supposed to have possessed Nicole Aubry of Laon, France, in the year 1566. He went to dine with her husband under the pretext of freeing her from demon possession, which he did not accomplish. It was observed that at supper he did not drink, which showed that demons are averse to water.
Banebdjedet Egypt "Ba of the Lord of Mendes" a fertility god and originally a ram with horns shaped like cork-screws, later he was often thought of as a he-goat. According to Herodotus his followers did not sacrifice goats. Egypt
Bassareus Greek A surname of Dionysus which, according to the explanations of the Greeks, is derived from the long robe which the god himself and the Maenads used to wear in Thrace, and whence the Maenads themselves are often called bassarae or bassarides. Greek
Bathym aka Bathim Greek Bathin, Marthin. One of the three demons in the service of Fleuretty. Duke of the Infernal Regions he has the appearance of a robust man but his body ends in a serpent's tail. He is well versed in the virtues of herbs and precious stones according to Wierius. He is able to transport men from one place to another with wondrous speed. He commands thirty legions. One of the 72 spirits of Solomon.
Bechoil Ireland Goddess of Melancholia. She was noted for her low levels of enthusiasm and low levels of eagerness for any activity. Ireland
Befana Italian The good fairy of Italian children, who is supposed to fill their stockings with toys when they go to bed on Twelfth Night. Some one enters the children's bedroom for the purpose, and the wakeful youngsters cry out, "Ecco la Befana." According to legend, Befana was too busy with house affairs to look after the Magi when they went to offer their gifts, and said she would wait to see them on their return; but they went another way, and Befana, every Twelfth Night, watches to see them. The name is a corruption of Epiphania.
Beju aka Bejuni Dongria A shaman who accepts gifts of gold ornaments to act as a link between the living and dead and god and goddesses. Dongria
Belesis or Belesys Assyrian The noblest of the Chaidaean priests at Babylon, who, according to the account of Ctesias, is said, in conjunction with Arbaces, the Mede, to have overthrown the old Assyrian empire. Beiesis afterwards received the satrapy of Babylon from Arbaces.
Belit Seri Babylon Goddess of justice and fairness. She kept the records of human activities. Babylon
Bellerophones Greek Or Bellerophon, properly called Hipponous, was a son of the Corinthian king Glaucus and Eurymede, and a grandson of Sisyphus. According to Hyginus, he was a son of Poseidon and Eurymede. Greek
Belomancy Greek Divination by arrows. Labels being attached to a given number of arrows, the archers let them fly, and the advice on the label of the arrow which flies farthest is accepted and acted on. This practice is common with the Arabs. Greek
Bereguni Slavic River nymphs accused of stealing newborn children. Probably a variation of the Hebrew Lilith myth. Driven by an insatiable hunger of envy, Lilith stalks the world by night raping men in their sleep and sucking their blood, or stealing their newborn children from their cots and eating them. Slavic
Bhima Buddhist A heroic warrior, son of Kunti by Vayu, but the acknowledged son of Pandu and the second eldest of the Pandava brothers Buddhist
Bhut India A type of evil spirit. It is especially the evil ghost of a man who has died due to execution, accident, or suicide. People protect themselves by lying on the ground, because the bhutas never rest on earth. In the Bhagvad Gita, Krishna the Avatar declares that the humans who worship bhutas become bhutas themselves. India
Bifrons Unk Demon of astronomy, geometry, and other such sciences, planetary influences. He often takes the form of a man. He is acquainted with the virtues of herbs, precious stones and plants. He can transport corpses from one place to another. It is he who lights the strange corpse lights above the tombs of the dead. Unk
Bilwis Teutonic A maleficent spirit who was active on Walpurgis Night and wrought havoc to the crops. Teutonic
Blinded Angel Catholic The devil Satan. According to Pope John Paul II the devil exists in perpetual darkness because he has blinded himself to the light and beauty of God. Catholic
Boon-givers India Favourers, finders of light, and Heaven, with gracious love accept my songs, my prayer, my hymn. The Rig-Veda
Boreas Greek Bopeas, or Bopas), the North wind, was, according to Hesiod (Theogony 379), a son of Astraeus and Eos, and brother of Hesperus, Zephyrus, and Notus. He dwelt in a cave of mount Haemus in Thrace. Greek
Bower of Bliss France A Wandering Island, the enchanted residence of Acrasia, destroyed by Sir Guyon. France
Briseis Greek A patronymic from Briseus, and the name of Hippodameia, the daughter of Briseus of Lyrnessus, who fell into the hands of Achilles, and about whom the quarrel arose between Achilles and Agamemnon. Greek
Bugarit British The spirit found on building sites and invoked as the cause of minor accidents. British
Bura Greek A daughter of Ion, the ancestral hero of the Ionians, and Helice, from whom, the Achaean town of Bura derived its name.
Buraicus Greek A surname of Heracles, derived from the Achaean town of Bura
Butes Greek Son of Boreas, a Thracian, was hostile towards his step-brother Lycurgus, and therefore compelled by his father to emigrate. He accordingly went with a band of colonists to the island of Strongyle, afterwards called Naxos. But as he and his companions had no women, they made predatory excursions, and also came to Thessaly, where they carried off the women who were just celebrating a festival of Dionysus. Butes himself took Coronis; but she invoked Dionysus, who struck Butes with madness, so that he threw himself into a well. Greek
Caaba Arab The shrine of Mecca, said by the Arabs to be built on the exact spot of the tabernacle let down from heaven at the prayer of repentant Adam. Adam had been a wanderer for 200 years, and here received pardon. The shrine was built, according to Arab tradition, by Ishmael, assisted by his father Abraham, who inserted in the walls a black stone presented to him by the angel Gabriel.
Cabeiri Greek Mystic divinities who occur in various parts of the ancient world. The obscurity that hangs over them, and the contradictions respecting them in the accounts of the ancients themselves, have opened a wide field for speculation to modern writers on mythology, each of whom has been tempted to propound a theory of his own. Greek
Caca Greek A sister of Cacus, who, according to some accounts, betrayed the place where the cattle were concealed which Cacus had stolen from Hercules or Recaranus. She was rewarded for it with divine honours, which she was to enjoy for ever. Greek
Cacodaemons Greek Minor deities, one of whom it was believed was attached to each mortal from his birth as a constant companion and acting as a sort of messenger between the gods and men.
Cadmilus Greek According to Acusilaus a son of Hephaestus and Cabeiro, and father of the Samothracian Cabeiri and the Cabeirian nymphs. Others consider Cadmilus himself as the fourth of the Samothracian Cabeiri. Greek
Cadmus Greek A son of Agenor and Telephassa, and brother of Europa, Phoenix, and Cilix. When Europa was carried off by Zeus to Crete, Agenor sent out his sons in search of their sister, enjoining them not to return without her. Telephassa accompanied her sons. All researches being fruitless, Cadmus and Telephassa settled in Thrace. Here Telephassa died, and Cadmus, after burying her, went to Delphi to consult the oracle respecting his sister. Greek
Caeculus Greek An ancient Italian hero of Praeneste. The account which Servius gives of him runs as follows: At Praeneste there were pontifices and indigetes as well as at Rome. There were however two brothers called indigetes who had a sister. Greek
Cagn Mantis Africa According to the Hottentots and the Bushman the supreme deity and creator of the world whose loves are ‘pleasing’ and it is especially attached to the moon, having made it out of one of its old shoes. Africa
Calpe Roman Calpe and Abyla. The two pillars of Hercules. According to one account, these two were originally only one mountain, which Hercules tore asunder; but some say he piled up each mountain separately, and poured the sea between them. Roman
Camilla Roman Of the Volsci was the daughter of King Metabus and Casmilla. Driven from his throne, Metabus was chased into the wilderness by armed Volsci, his infant daughter in his hands. The river Amasenus blocked his path, and, fearing for the child's welfare, Metabus bound her to a spear. He promised Diana that Camilla would be her servant, a warrior virgin. He then safely threw her to the other side, and swam across to retrieve her. Roman
Canopus Egyptian The Egyptian god of water. The Chaldeans worshipped fire, and sent all the other gods a challenge, which was accepted by a priest of Canopus. The Chaldeans lighted a vast fire round the god Canopus, when the Egyptian deity spouted out torrents of water and quenched the fire, thereby obtaining the triumph of water over fire.
Cao Guo Jiu Chinese One of the Chinese Ba Xian, he is also the patron saint of actors and actresses.
Capricorn Roman "the centaur archer." Capricornus is the tenth, or, strictly speaking, the eleventh sign of the zodiac. (Dec. 21-Jan. 20.) According to classic mythology, Capricorn was Pan, who, from fear of the great Typhon, changed himself into a goat, and was made by Jupiter one of the signs of the zodiac. Roman
Castalia Greek Nymph of the Castalian spring at the foot of mount Parnassus. She was regarded as a daughter of Achelous and was believed to have thrown herself into the well when pursued by Apollo. Greek
Ce Actal Aztec An avatar of Mixcaotl, he represents the warrior's savagery in battle. Aztec
Cecrops Greek According to Apollodorus the first king of Attica, which derived from him its name Cecropia, having previously borne the name of Acte. He is described as an autochthon, the upper part of whose body was human, while the lower was that of a dragon. Hence he is gemimis. Greek
Celaeno Greek A Pleiad, daughter of Atlas and Pleione, and by Poseidon the mother of Lycus and Eurypylus, or, according to others, of Lycus and Chimaereus by Prometheus. Greek
Centaurs Greek That is, the bull-killers, are according to the earliest accounts a race of men who inhabited the mountains and forests of Thessaly. Greek
Cercyon Greek A son of Poseidon by a daughter of Amphictyon, and accordingly a half-brother of Triptolemus. Others call him a son of Hephaestus. He came from Arcadia, and dwelt at Eleusis in Attica. Greek
Cghene Nigeria The supreme God of the Isoko people in southern Nigeria. He is believed to have created the world and all peoples, including the Isoko. Cghene is beyond human comprehension and is only known by his actions. Because the God is so distant and unknown he has no temples or priests, and no prayers or sacrifices are offered directly to him.
Chalciope Greek 1. A daughter of Rhexenor, or according to others of Chalcodon, was the second wife of Aegeus.
Chalcon2 Greek Of Cyparissus, the shield-bearer of Antilochus. He was in love with the Amazon Penthesileia, but on hastening to her assistance he was killed by Achilles, and the Greeks nailed his body to a cross. Greek
Chaos Greek The vacant and infinite space which existed according to the ancient cosmogonies previous to the creation of the world (Theogony 116), and out of which the gods, men, and all things arose. Greek
Charon Greek A son of Erebos, the aged and dirty ferryman in the lower world, who conveyed in his boat the shades of the dead - though only of those whose bodies were buried across the rivers of the lower world. Greek
Charybdis and Scylla Greek The names of two rocks between Italy and Sicily, and only a short distance from one another. In the midst of the one of these rocks which was nearest to Italy, there dwelt, according to Homer, Scylla, a daughter of Crataeis, a fearful monster, barking like a dog, with twelve feet, six long necks and mouths, each of which contained three rows of sharp teeth. Greek
Cheiron Greek The wisest and justest of all the centaurs. He was the instructor of Achilles, whose father Peleus was a friend and relative of Cheiron, and received at his wedding with Thetis the heavy lance which was subsequently used by Achilles. Greek
Chilminar and Balbec Persian Two cities built by the Genii, acting under the orders of Jan ben Jan, who governed the world long before the time of Adam. Chilminar, or the "Forty Pillars," is Persepolis. These two cities were built as lurking places for the Genii to hide in. Persian
Chimaera Greek A fire-breathing monster, which, according to the Homeric poems, was of divine origin. Greek
Chloris Greek A daughter of the Theban Amphion and Niobe. According to an Argive tradition, her original name was Meliboea, and she and her brother Amyclas were the only children of Niobe that were not killed by Apollo and Artemis. But the terror of Chloris at the death of her brothers and sisters was so great, that she turned perfectly white, and was therefore called Chloris. Greek
Cihuateto Aztec These are women that die in childbirth, gain eternal life & become spirits that accompany the sun
Cinyras Greek A famous Cyprian hero. According to the common tradition, he was a son of Apollo by Paphos, king of Cyprus, and priest of the Paphian Aphrodite, which latter office remained hereditary in his family, the Cinyradae. Greek
Cleolla Greek According to Hesiod, Catalogues of Women, Pleisthenes was a son of Atreus and Aerope, and Agamemnon, Menelaus and Anaxibia were the children of Pleisthenes by Cleolla the daughter of Dias. Greek
Clytius Greek 1. A son of Laomedon and father of Caletor and Procleia, was one of the Trojan elders. 2. A son of the Oechalian king Eurytus, was one of the Argonauts, and was killed during the expedition by Heracles, or according to others by Aeetes. Greek
Cocytus Greek Meaning river of wailing or lamentation, was the river in the underworld on the banks of which the dead who could not pay Charon wandered, according to most accounts, for one hundred years. It flowed into the river Acheron, across which lay Hades, the mythological abode of the dead. Greek
Corineus British A hero in the employ of Brute, who conquered the giant Goem'agot, for which achievement the whole western horn of England was allotted him. He called it Corinea, and the people Corineans, from his own name. British
Creusa Greek 1. A daughter of Oceanus and Ge. She was a Naid, and became by Peneius the mother of Hypseus, king of the Lapithae, and of Stilbe. 2. A daughter of Erechtheus and Praxithea, was married to Xuthus, by whom she became the mother of Achaeus and Ion. Greek
Crimisus Greek A son of Oceanus and Tethys. According to Virgil's Aeneid* (5.38) and Hyginus' Fabulae (273), Crinisus was the father of Acestes by Segesta (Egesta). Greek
Cyathus Greek The youthful cup-bearer of Oeneus, was killed by Heracles on account of a fault committed in the discharge of his duty. Greek
Cyclopes Greek Cyclopes According to the ancient cosmogonies, the Cyclopes were the sons of Uranus and Ge; they belonged to the Titans, and were three in number, whose names were Arges, Steropes, and Brontes, and each of them had only one eye on his forehead. Together with the other Titans, they were cast by their father into Tartarus, but, instigated by their mother, they assisted Cronus in usurping the government.
Cymochles British A man of prodigious might, brother of Pyrochles, son of Malice (Acrates) and Despite, and husband of Acrasia, the enchantress. He sets out to encounter Sir Guyen, but is ferried over the idle lake by Wantonness (Ph?'dria), and forgets himself; he is slain by King Arthur. British
Dactyls Greek The Dactyls of mount Ida in Phrygia, fabulous beings to whom the discovery of iron and the art of working it by means of fire was ascribed. Their name Dactyls, that is, Fingers, is accounted for in various ways; by their number being five or ten, or by the fact of their serving Rhea just as the fingers serve the hand, or by the story of their having lived at the foot of mount Ida. Greek
Daedalos Crete A Greek who formed the Cretan labyrinth, and made for himself wings, by means of which he flew from Crete across the Archipelago. He is said to have invented the saw, the axe and the gimlet.
Daffodil Greek/Roman Or "Lent Lily," was once white; but Persephone, daughter of Demeter, delighted to wander about the flowery meadows of Sicily. One spring, throwing herself on the grass, she fell asleep. The god of the Infernal Regions, Pluto, fell in love with the beautiful maid, and carried her off for his bride. His touch turned the white flowers to a golden yellow, and some of them fell in Acheron, where they grew luxuriantly; and ever since the flower has been planted on graves. Greek/Roman