A : B : C : D : E : F : G : H : I : J : K : L : M : N : O : P : Q : R : S : T : U : V : W : X : Y : Z :
Divorce Is Not 'A Choice'   Read Gods and Monsters   Egyptian gods  
God of the sea   Indian goddess   God of water   God of war  

List of Gods : "According"
NameOriginDescription
According to others Greek She was a daughter of Helios and Amphitrite, or of Poseidon and Aphrodite, lastly of Oceanus. Greek
Achelous Greece The god of the river Achelous which was the greatest, and according to tradition, the most ancient among the rivers of Greece.
Achiroe Greek According to Apollodorus ii Anchinoe, which is perhaps a mistake for Anchiroe, was a daughter of Nilus, and the wife of Belus, by whom she became the mother of Aegyptus and Danaus.
Achlys Greek According to some ancient cosmogonies, the eternal night, and the first created being which existed even before Chaos. According to Hesiod, she was the personification of misery and sadness, and as such she was represented on the shield of Heracles: pale, emaciated, and weeping, with chattering teeth, swollen knees, long nails on her fingers, bloody cheeks, and her shoulders thickly covered with dust.
Acis Greek According to Ovid (Metamorphoses I) a son of Faunus and Symaethis.
Adam was buried Arabia According to Arabian tradition, on Aboucais, a mountain of Arabia.
Adamastor Greek The spirit of the stormy Cape (Good Hope), described by Camoens in the Lusiad as a hideous phantom. According to Barreto, he was one of the giants who invaded heaven.
Adaran Greek According to the Parsee superstition, is a sacred fire less holy than that called Behram
Adonis Assyria A son of Cinyras and Medarme, according to Hesiod a son of Phoenix and Alphesiboea, and according to the cyclic poet Panyasis, a son of Tlieias, king of Assyria, who begot him by his own daughter Smyrna. (Myrrha.)
Aegeus Greek According to some accounts a son of Pandion II. king of Athens, and of Pylia, while others call him a son of Scyrius or Phemius, and state that he was only an adopted son of Pandion.
Aetna Roman A Sicilian nymph, and according to Alcimus, a daughter of Uranus and Gaea, or of Briareus. Simonides said that she had acted as arbitrator between Hephaestus and Demeter respecting the possession of Sicily.
Agenor Libya A son of Poseidon and Libya, king of Phoenicia, and twin-brother of Belus. (Apollod. ii. 1. § 4.) He married Telephassa, by whom he became the father of Cadmus, Phoenix, Cylix, Thasus, Phineus, and according to some of Europa also. 2 3 4 5 6
Agrat Bat Mahalat Semitic Goddess known for her role as sexual temptress and seductress. According to the Talmud, she is the "spirit of uncleanness". Semitic
Airapadam Indian The white elephant, one of the eight which, according to Indian mythology, sustain the earth.
Aius Locutius Gallic Loquens, was a Roman numen associated with the Gallic invasions of the early 4th century. In 390 BC, the Gauls moved in the direction of Rome. According to Roman folklore, a Roman named Caedicius kept hearing a disembodied nocturnal voice at the base of the Palatine hill in the Forum Romanum. The voice warned Caedicius of the oncoming attack and recommended that the walls of Rome be fortified.
Alcmene Greek A daughter of Electryon, king of Messene, by Anaxo, the daughter of Alcaeus. According to other accounts her mother was called Lysidice or Eurydice.
Althaea Greek A daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius and Eurythemis, and sister of Lecla, Hypermnestra, Iphiclus, Euippus, etc. She was married to Oeneus, king of Calydon, by whom she became the mother of Troxeus, Thyreus, Clymenus, and Meleager, and of two daughters, Gorge and Deianeira. (Apollodorus i) Apollodorus states, that according to some, Meleager was regarded as the fruit of her intercourse with Ares, and that she was mother of Deianeira by Dionysus.
Amitabha Buddhist/India A celestial buddha described in the scriptures of the Mahayana school of Buddhism. According to these scriptures, Amitabha possesses infinite merits resulting from good deeds over countless past lives as a bodhisattva named Dharmakara. Buddhist/India
Amphictyon Greek A son of Deucalion and Pyrrha or according to others an autochthon, who after having married Cranae, the daughter of Cranaus, king of Attica, expelled his father-in-law from his kingdom and usurped his throne. He ruled for twelve years, and was then in turn expelled by Erichthomus.
Amphidamas Greek A son of Lycurgus and Cleophile, and father of Antimache, who married Eurystheus. (Apollodorus iii) According to Pausanias and Apollonius Rhodius (Argonautica) he was a son of Aleus, and consequently a brother of Lycurgus, Cepheus, and Auge, and took part in the expedition of the Argonauts.
Amphilochus Greek A son of Amphiaraus and Eriphyle, and brother of Alcmaeon. (Apollodorus iii) When his father went against Thebes, Amphiloehus was, according to Pausanias, yet an infant, although ten years afterwards he is mentioned as one of the Epigoni, and according to some traditions assisted his brother in the murder of his mother.
Amphitrite Greek According to Hesiod (Theogony) and Apollodorus a Nereid, though in other places Apollodorus calls her an Oceanid. She is represented as the wife of Poseidon and the goddess of the sea (the Mediterranean), and she is therefore a kind of female Poseidon.
Amymone Greek One of the daughters of Danaus and Elephantis. When Danaus arrived in Argos, the country, according to the wish of Poseidon, who was indignant at Inachus, was suffering from a drought, and Danaus sent out Amymone to fetch water.
Angel-year Greek According to Cornelius Agrippa and other occult philosophers, the year of an angel is 365 mortal years.
Angels of Vengeance Greek Twelve angels among the first formed at Creation, although according to official Catholic doctrine, all angels were formed simultaneously. Only five are mentioned by name: Saten'el, Michael, Uriel, Rappheal and Nathan'el.
Angelus Greek A surname of Artemis, according to some accounts the original name of Hecate.
Angerona Roman Goddess of anguish, secrecy, silence and the winter solstice. According to one class of passages she is the goddess of anguish and fear, that is, the goddess who not only produces this state of mind, but also relieves men from it. Roman
Aonian Greek Poetical, pertaining to the Muses. The Muses, according to Grecian mythology, dwelt in Aonia, that part of Boetia which contains Mount Helicon and the Muses' Fountain. Greek
Apheidas Greek A son of Arcas by Leaneira, or according to others, by Meganeira, Chrysopeleia, or Erato.
Aphrodite Greek One of the great Olympian divinities, according to the popular and poetical notions of the Greeks, the goddess of love and beauty. Some traditions stated that she had sprung from the foam of the sea, which had gathered around the mutilated parts of Uranus, that had been thrown into the sea by Cronus after he had unmanned his father. (Theogony of Hesiod)
Apollo Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks, was, according to Homer, the son of Zeus and Leto. Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod 918) states the same, and adds, that Apollo's sister was Artemis. Neither of the two poets suggests anything in regard to the birth-place of the god, unless we take "born in Lycia," which, however, according to others, would only mean "born of or in light." Apollo is one of the few Greek gods who did not sleep with Aphrodite
Arariel Jewish An angel who, according to the rabbis of the Talmud, takes charge of the waters of the earth. Fishermen invoke him so that they may take large fish. Arariel has also traditionally been invoked as a cure for stupidity. Jewish
Ares Greek The god of war and one of the great Olympian gods of the Greeks. He is represented as the son of Zeus and Hera. A later tradition, according to which Hera conceived Ares by touching a certain flower, appears to be an imitation of the legend about the birth of Hephaestus, and is related by Ovid.
Argonautae Greek The heroes and demigods who, according to the traditions of the Greeks, undertook the first bold maritime expedition to Colchis, a far distant country on the coast of the Euxine, for the purpose of fetching the golden fleeces. They derived their name from the ship Argo, in which the voyage was made, and which was constructed by Argus at the command of Jason, the leader of the Argonauts.
Aristaeus Greece An ancient divinity worshipped in various parts of Greece, as in Thessaly, Ceos, and Boeotia, but especially in the islands of the Aegean, Ionian, and Adriatic seas, which had once been inhabited by Pelasgians. He is described either as a son of Uranus and Ge, or according to a more general tradition, as the son of Apollo by Cyrene, the grand-daughter of Peneius.
Artemis Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks. Her name is usually derived from uninjured, healthy, vigorous; according to which she would be the goddess who is herself inviolate and vigorous, and also grants strength and health to others. According to the Homeric account and Hesiod (Theogony 918) she was the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was the sister of Apollo, and born with him at the same time in the island of Delos.
Asia Greek 1. A surname of Athena in Colchis. Her worship was believed to have been brought from thence by Castor and Polydeuces to Laconia, where a temple was built to her at Las. 2. A daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, who became by Japetus the mother of Atlas, Prometheus, and Epimetheus. (Theogony of Hesiod 359.) According to some traditions the continent of Asia derived its name from her.
Asopus Greek The god of the river Asopus, was a son of Oceanus and Tethys, or according to others, of Poseidon and Pero, of Zeus and Eurynome, or lastly of Poseidon and Cegluse.
Asteria Greek A daughter of the Titan Coeus and Phoebe. She was the sister of Leto, and, according to Hesiod (Theogony 409), the wife of Perses, by whom she became the mother of Hecate.
Ate Greek According to Hesiod (Theogony), a daughter of Eris, and, according to Homer, of Zeus, was an ancient Greek divinity, who led both gods and men to rash and inconsiderate actions and to suffering.
Athena Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks. Homer calls her a daughter of Zeus, without any allusion to her mother or to the manner in which she was called into existence, while most of the later traditions agree in stating that she was born from the head of Zeus. According to the Theogony of Hesiod, Metis, the first wife of Zeus, was the mother of Athena, but when Metis was pregnant with her, Zeus, on the advice of Gaea and Uranus, swallowed Metis up, and afterwards gave birth himself to Athena, who sprang from his head.
Atlas Greek According to Hesiod (Theogony 507), a son of Japetus and Clymene, and a brother of Menoetius, Prometheus, and Epimetheus. According to Apollodorus his mother's name was Asia and, according to Hyginus, he was a son of Aether and Gaia.
Augeas Greek A son of Phorbas and Hermione, and king of the Epeians in Elis. According to some accounts he was a son of Eleios or Helios or Poseidon.
Autolycus Greek A son of Hermes or Daedalion by Chione, Philonis, or Telauge. He was the husband of Neaera, or according to Homer, of Amphithea, by whom he became the father of Anticleia, the mother of Odysseus and Aesimus.
Autonoe Greek A daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, was the wife of Aristaeus, by whom she became the mother of Polydorus. (Theogony of Hesiod) According to Apollodorus (Apollodorus iii), Polydorus was a brother of Autonoe, and Actaeon was her son.
Auxo 1 Greek One of the Horae. 2. An ancient Attic divinity, who was worshipped, according to Pausanias, together with Hegemone, under the name of Charites
Ayya Vaikundar Tamil According to Akilattirattu Ammanai, a scripture of the Ayyavazhi, was an avatar of Narayana. As per the Ayyavazhi mythology the body in which Ayya Vaikundar incarnated is that of Mudisoodum Perumal. Tamil
Banebdjedet Egypt "Ba of the Lord of Mendes" a fertility god and originally a ram with horns shaped like cork-screws, later he was often thought of as a he-goat. According to Herodotus his followers did not sacrifice goats. Egypt
Bassareus Greek A surname of Dionysus which, according to the explanations of the Greeks, is derived from the long robe which the god himself and the Maenads used to wear in Thrace, and whence the Maenads themselves are often called bassarae or bassarides. Greek
Bathym aka Bathim Greek Bathin, Marthin. One of the three demons in the service of Fleuretty. Duke of the Infernal Regions he has the appearance of a robust man but his body ends in a serpent's tail. He is well versed in the virtues of herbs and precious stones according to Wierius. He is able to transport men from one place to another with wondrous speed. He commands thirty legions. One of the 72 spirits of Solomon.
Befana Italian The good fairy of Italian children, who is supposed to fill their stockings with toys when they go to bed on Twelfth Night. Some one enters the children's bedroom for the purpose, and the wakeful youngsters cry out, "Ecco la Befana." According to legend, Befana was too busy with house affairs to look after the Magi when they went to offer their gifts, and said she would wait to see them on their return; but they went another way, and Befana, every Twelfth Night, watches to see them. The name is a corruption of Epiphania.
Belesis or Belesys Assyrian The noblest of the Chaidaean priests at Babylon, who, according to the account of Ctesias, is said, in conjunction with Arbaces, the Mede, to have overthrown the old Assyrian empire. Beiesis afterwards received the satrapy of Babylon from Arbaces.
Bellerophones Greek Or Bellerophon, properly called Hipponous, was a son of the Corinthian king Glaucus and Eurymede, and a grandson of Sisyphus. According to Hyginus, he was a son of Poseidon and Eurymede. Greek
Blinded Angel Catholic The devil Satan. According to Pope John Paul II the devil exists in perpetual darkness because he has blinded himself to the light and beauty of God. Catholic
Boreas Greek Bopeas, or Bopas), the North wind, was, according to Hesiod (Theogony 379), a son of Astraeus and Eos, and brother of Hesperus, Zephyrus, and Notus. He dwelt in a cave of mount Haemus in Thrace. Greek
Butes Greek Son of Boreas, a Thracian, was hostile towards his step-brother Lycurgus, and therefore compelled by his father to emigrate. He accordingly went with a band of colonists to the island of Strongyle, afterwards called Naxos. But as he and his companions had no women, they made predatory excursions, and also came to Thessaly, where they carried off the women who were just celebrating a festival of Dionysus. Butes himself took Coronis; but she invoked Dionysus, who struck Butes with madness, so that he threw himself into a well. Greek
Caaba Arab The shrine of Mecca, said by the Arabs to be built on the exact spot of the tabernacle let down from heaven at the prayer of repentant Adam. Adam had been a wanderer for 200 years, and here received pardon. The shrine was built, according to Arab tradition, by Ishmael, assisted by his father Abraham, who inserted in the walls a black stone presented to him by the angel Gabriel.
Caca Greek A sister of Cacus, who, according to some accounts, betrayed the place where the cattle were concealed which Cacus had stolen from Hercules or Recaranus. She was rewarded for it with divine honours, which she was to enjoy for ever. Greek
Cadmilus Greek According to Acusilaus a son of Hephaestus and Cabeiro, and father of the Samothracian Cabeiri and the Cabeirian nymphs. Others consider Cadmilus himself as the fourth of the Samothracian Cabeiri. Greek
Cagn Mantis Africa According to the Hottentots and the Bushman the supreme deity and creator of the world whose loves are ‘pleasing’ and it is especially attached to the moon, having made it out of one of its old shoes. Africa
Calpe Roman Calpe and Abyla. The two pillars of Hercules. According to one account, these two were originally only one mountain, which Hercules tore asunder; but some say he piled up each mountain separately, and poured the sea between them. Roman
Capricorn Roman "the centaur archer." Capricornus is the tenth, or, strictly speaking, the eleventh sign of the zodiac. (Dec. 21-Jan. 20.) According to classic mythology, Capricorn was Pan, who, from fear of the great Typhon, changed himself into a goat, and was made by Jupiter one of the signs of the zodiac. Roman
Cecrops Greek According to Apollodorus the first king of Attica, which derived from him its name Cecropia, having previously borne the name of Acte. He is described as an autochthon, the upper part of whose body was human, while the lower was that of a dragon. Hence he is gemimis. Greek
Celaeno Greek A Pleiad, daughter of Atlas and Pleione, and by Poseidon the mother of Lycus and Eurypylus, or, according to others, of Lycus and Chimaereus by Prometheus. Greek
Centaurs Greek That is, the bull-killers, are according to the earliest accounts a race of men who inhabited the mountains and forests of Thessaly. Greek
Cercyon Greek A son of Poseidon by a daughter of Amphictyon, and accordingly a half-brother of Triptolemus. Others call him a son of Hephaestus. He came from Arcadia, and dwelt at Eleusis in Attica. Greek
Chalciope Greek 1. A daughter of Rhexenor, or according to others of Chalcodon, was the second wife of Aegeus.
Chaos Greek The vacant and infinite space which existed according to the ancient cosmogonies previous to the creation of the world (Theogony 116), and out of which the gods, men, and all things arose. Greek
Charybdis and Scylla Greek The names of two rocks between Italy and Sicily, and only a short distance from one another. In the midst of the one of these rocks which was nearest to Italy, there dwelt, according to Homer, Scylla, a daughter of Crataeis, a fearful monster, barking like a dog, with twelve feet, six long necks and mouths, each of which contained three rows of sharp teeth. Greek
Chimaera Greek A fire-breathing monster, which, according to the Homeric poems, was of divine origin. Greek
Chloris Greek A daughter of the Theban Amphion and Niobe. According to an Argive tradition, her original name was Meliboea, and she and her brother Amyclas were the only children of Niobe that were not killed by Apollo and Artemis. But the terror of Chloris at the death of her brothers and sisters was so great, that she turned perfectly white, and was therefore called Chloris. Greek
Cinyras Greek A famous Cyprian hero. According to the common tradition, he was a son of Apollo by Paphos, king of Cyprus, and priest of the Paphian Aphrodite, which latter office remained hereditary in his family, the Cinyradae. Greek
Cleolla Greek According to Hesiod, Catalogues of Women, Pleisthenes was a son of Atreus and Aerope, and Agamemnon, Menelaus and Anaxibia were the children of Pleisthenes by Cleolla the daughter of Dias. Greek
Clytius Greek 1. A son of Laomedon and father of Caletor and Procleia, was one of the Trojan elders. 2. A son of the Oechalian king Eurytus, was one of the Argonauts, and was killed during the expedition by Heracles, or according to others by Aeetes. Greek
Cocytus Greek Meaning river of wailing or lamentation, was the river in the underworld on the banks of which the dead who could not pay Charon wandered, according to most accounts, for one hundred years. It flowed into the river Acheron, across which lay Hades, the mythological abode of the dead. Greek
Crimisus Greek A son of Oceanus and Tethys. According to Virgil's Aeneid* (5.38) and Hyginus' Fabulae (273), Crinisus was the father of Acestes by Segesta (Egesta). Greek
Cyclopes Greek Cyclopes According to the ancient cosmogonies, the Cyclopes were the sons of Uranus and Ge; they belonged to the Titans, and were three in number, whose names were Arges, Steropes, and Brontes, and each of them had only one eye on his forehead. Together with the other Titans, they were cast by their father into Tartarus, but, instigated by their mother, they assisted Cronus in usurping the government.
Dahak Persia The Satan of Persia. According to Persian mythology, the ages of the world are divided into periods of 1,000 years. When the cycle of "chiliasms" (1,000-year periods) is complete, the reign of Ormuzd will begin, and men will be all good and all happy; but this event will be preceded by the loosing of Dahak, who will break his chain and fall upon the world, and bring on man the most dreadful calamities. Two prophets will appear to cheer the oppressed, and announce the advent of Ormuzd.
Damocles' Sword Greek Evil foreboded or dreaded. Damocles, the sycophant of Dionysius the elder, of Syracuse, was invited by the tyrant to try the felicity he so much envied. Accordingly he was set down to a sumptuous banquet, but overhead was a sword suspended by a hair. Damocles was afraid to stir, and the banquet was a tantalising torment to him. Related by Cicero
Daphne Greek A fair maiden who is mixed up with various traditions about Apollo. According to Pausanias she was an Oreas and an ancient priestess of the Delphic oracle to which she had been appointed by Ge. Diodorus describes her as the daughter of Teiresias, who is better known by the name of Manto. Greek
Deidameia Greek 1. A daughter of Bellerophontes and wife of Evander, by whom she became the mother of Sarpedon. Homer calls her Laodameia. 2. A daughter of Lycomedes in the island of Scyrus. When Achilles was concealed there in maiden's attire, Deidameia became by him the mother of Pyrrhus or Neoptolemus, and, according to others, of Oneirus also. (Apollodorus iii) 3. The wife of Peirithous, who is commonly called Hippodameia. Greek
Dendritis Greek The goddess of the tree, occurs as a surname of Helen at Rhodes, and the following story is related to account for it. After the death of Menelaus, Helen was driven from her home by two natural sons of her husband. She fled to Rhodes, and sought the protection of her friend Polyxo, the widow of Tlepolemus. But Polyxo bore Helen a grudge, since her own husband Tlepolemus had fallen a victim in the Trojan war. Accordingly, once while Helen was bathing, Polyxo sent out her servants in the disguise of the Erinnyes, with the command to hang Helen on a tree.
Dice Greek The personification of justice, was, according to Hesiod, a daughter of Zeus and Themis, and the sister of Eunomia and Eirene. She was considered as one of the Horae; she watched the deeds of man, and approached the throne of Zeus with lamentations whenever a judge violated justice. Greek
Dione Greek A female Titan, a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, and, according to others, of Uranus and Ge, or of Aether and Ge. She was beloved by Zeus, by whom she became the mother of Aphrodite. Greek
Dives aka Divs Arab Deevs. Demons of Persian mythology. According to the Koran, they are ferocious and gigantic spirits under the sovereignty of Eblis.
Dryops Greek A son of the river-god Spercheius, by the Danaid Polydora or, according to others, a son of Lycaon (probably a mistake for Apollo) by Dia, the daughter of Lycaon, who concealed her new-born infant in a hollow oak tree.
Duergar Norse/Germany Dwarfs who dwell in rocks and hills; noted for their strength, subtilty, magical powers, and skill in metallurgy. They are the personification of the subterranean powers of nature. According to the Gotho-German myth, the duergar were first maggots in Ymir's flesh, but afterwards assumed the likeness of men. The first duergar was Modsogner, the next Dyrin. Norse/Germany
Echidna Greek A daughter of Tartarus and Ge, or of Chrysaor and Callirrhoe and according to others again, of Peiras and Styx. Half-woman, half-serpent. She was mother of the Chim?ra, the many-headed dog Orthos, the hundred-headed dragon of the Hesperides, the Colchian dragon, the Sphinx, Cerberus, Scylla, the Gorgons, the Lern?an hydra, the vulture that gnawed away the liver of Prometheus, and the Nemean lion. Greek
El Khidr Arab One of the good angels, according to the Koran.
Enceladus Greek A son of Tartarus and Ge, and one of the hundred-armed giants who made war upon the gods. He was killed, according to some, by Zeus, by a flash of lightning, and buried under mount Aetna and according to others, he was killed by the chariot of Athena, or by the spear of Seilenus. Greek
Epidaurus Greek The mythical founder of Epidaurus, a son of Argos and Evadne, but according to Argive legends a son of Pelops, and according to those of Elis a son of Apollo. Greek
Eris Greek Born of Ate and Zeus, or, according to Homer, Hera and Zeus (Iliad IV), she is the goddess who calls forth war and discord. According to the Iliad, she wanders about, at first small and insignificant, but she soon raises her head up to heaven (IV). Greek
Eurynomus Greek A daemon of the lower world, concerning whom there was a tradition at Delphi, according to which, he devoured the flesh of dead human bodies, and left nothing but the bones. Greek
Eurytion Greek A son of Irus and Demonassa, and a grandson of Actor, is mentioned among the Argonauts. (Argonautica) According to others he was a son of Actor, and he is also called Eurytus. (Apollodorus i) When Peleus was expelled from his dominions, he fled to Eurytion and married his daughter Antigone but in shooting at the Calydonian boar, Peleus inadvertently killed his father-in-law, (Apollodorus iii)
Fates Greek Properly signifies "a share," and as a personification "the deity who assigns to every man his fate or his share," or the Fates. Homer usually speaks of only one Moira, and only once mentions the Motpai in the plural. In his poems Moira is fate personified, which, at the birth of man, spins out the thread of his future life, follows his steps, and directs the consequences of his actions according to the counsel of the gods. Homer thus, when he personifies Fate, conceives her as spinning, an act by which also the power of other gods over the life of man is expressed. Greek
Faula Greek Was, according to some, a concubine of Heracles in Italy while, according to others, she was the wife or sister of Faunus. Latinus, who is called a son of Heracles by a concubine, was probably considered to be the son of Faula whereas the common tradition describes him as a son of Faunus. Faula was identified by some of the ancients with the Greek Aphrodite. Greek
Feronia Etruscan Goddess of the autumn, fire and volcanoes. She also served as a goddess of travel, fire, and waters. Erilio, the king of Preneste, was her son according to one tradition. According to another tradition her son was the underworld god Herulus. Etruscan
Frau Welt German A female fairy mistress according to the medieval church, the devil.
Gadreel Hebrew/Christian According to Enochian lore it was Gadreel, a fallen angel, and not one of Satan's Subtle Serpents, who led Eve astray. He also, along with Azazel, introduced weaponry to mankind.
Ganymedes Greek According to Homer and others, he was a son of Tros by Calirrhoe, and a brother of Ilus and Assaracus. Being the most beautiful of all mortals, he was carried off by the gods that he might fill the cup of Zeus, and live among the eternal gods. Greek
Gigantes Greek According to Homer, they were a gigantic and savage race of men, governed by Eurymedon, and dwelling in the distant west, in the island of Thrinacia; but they were extirpated by Eurymedon on account of their insolence towards the gods. Greek
Gorgo Greek According to the Odyssey, was one of the frightful phantoms in Hades. In the Iliad the Aegis of Athena contains the head of Gorgo, the terror of her enemies.
Hansa Hindu/Puranic The name, according to the Bhagavata Purana, of the "One Caste" when there were as yet no varieties of caste, but verily "one Veda, one Deity and one Caste". Hindu/Puranic
Harmonia Greek A daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, or, according to others, of Zeus and Electra, the daughter of Atlas, in Samothrace. When Athena assigned to Cadmus the government of Thebes, Zeus gave him Harmoia for his wife, and all the gods of Olympus were present at the marriage. Cadmus on that day made her a present of a peplus and a necklace, which he had received either from Hephaestus or from Europa. Greek
Hebe Greek The personification of youth, is described as a daughter of Zeus and Hera ( Apollodorus i), and is, according to the Iliad IV, the minister of the gods, who fills their cups with nectar; she assists Hera in putting the horses to her chariot and she bathes and dresses her brother Ares. She was married to Heracles after his apotheosis. Greek
Hecate Greek A mysterious divinity, who, according to the most common tradition, was a daughter of Persaeus or Perses and Asteria, whence she is called Perseis. Others describe her as a daughter of Zeus and Demeter, and state that she was sent out by her father in search of Persephone; others again make her a daughter of Zeus either by Pheraea or by Hera; and others, lastly, say that she was a daughter of Leto or Tartarus. Greek
Heimdal Norse He was the heavenly watchman in the old mythology, answering to St. Peter in the medieval. According to the Lay of Rig (Heimdal), he was the father and founder of the different classes of men, nobles, churls and thralls. He has a horn called Gjallar-horn, which he blows at Ragnarok. His dwelling is Himinbjorg. He is the keeper of Bifrost (the rainbow). Nine giantesses are his mothers. Norse
Heliadae Greek The male and female descendants of Helios, and might accordingly be applied to all his children, but in mythology the name is given more particularly to the seven sons and the one daughter of Helios by Rhode or Rhodos. Their names are, Cercaphus, Actis, Macareus, Tanages, Triopas, Phaeton, Ochimus, and Electryone. Greek
Hellen Greek A son of Deucalion and Pyrrha, or, according to others, a son of Zeus and Dorippe (Argonautica), or of Prometheus and Clymene, and a brother of Deucalion. By the nymph Orseis, that is, the mountain nymph, he became the father of Aeolus, Dorus, and Xuthus to whom some add Amphictyon. Greek
Hephaestus Greek The god of fire, was, according to the Homeric account, the son of Zeus and Hera The Romans, when speaking of the Greek Hephaestus, call him Vulcan or Vulcanus, although Vulcanus was an original Italian divinity. Later traditions state that he had no father, and that Hera gave birth to him independent of Zeus, as she was jealous of Zeus having given birth to Athena independent of her. Greek
Hephaistos Greek The god of smiths and metal-workers was the son of Hera. He was born lame, and his mother was so displeased at the sight of him that she flung him out of Olympus. Other accounts say that Zeus threw him out for taking his mother's part in a quarrel which occurred between them. Hephaistos's lameness, according to this account, was the consequence of his fall. He was a whole day falling, and at last alighted in the island of Lemnos, which was thenceforth sacred to him. Greek
Hera Greek Probably identical with kera, mistress, just as her husband, Zeus, was called eppos in the Aeolian dialect. The derivation of the name has been attempted in a variety of ways, from Greek as well as oriental roots, though there is no reason for having recourse to the latter, as Hera is a purely Greek divinity, and one of the few who, according to Herodotus, were not introduced into Greece from Egypt. Greek
Hestia Greek The goddess of the hearth, or rather the fire burning on the hearth, was regarded as one of the twelve great gods, and accordingly as a daughter of Cronus and Rhea. Greek
Houri Koran The large blackeyed damsels of Paradise, possessed of perpetual youth and beauty, whose virginity is renewable at pleasure. Every believer will have seventy-two of these houris in Paradise, and his intercourse with them will be fruitful or otherwise, according to his wish. If an offspring is desired, it will grow to full estate in an hour. (Persian, huri; Arabic, huriya, nymphs of paradise. Koran
Hyacinthus Greek The youngest son of the Spartan king Amyclas and Diomede (Apollodorus iii), but according to others a son of Pierus and Clio, or of Oebalus or Eurotas. He was a youth of extraordinary beauty, and beloved by Thamyris and Apollo, who unintentionally killed him during a game of discus. Greek
I conjure you Egypt O sword, by the three Holy Names, ALBROT, ABRACADABRA, JEOVA! Be thou my fortress and defence against all enemies, visible and invisible, in every magical work. By the Holy Name SADAY, which is great in power, and by these other names, CADOS, CADOS, CADOS, ADONAY, ELOY, ZENA, OTH, OCHIMANUEL, the First and the Last, Wisdom, Way, Life, Virtue, Chief, Mouth, Speech, Splendour, Light, Sun, Fountain, Glory, Mountain, Vine, Gate, Stone, Staff, Priest, Immortal, MESSIAH, Sword, do thou rule in all my affairs and prevail in those things which oppose me. Amen. Ceremonial Magic Zendou Ki. A protecter spirit who, along with Myodou Ki, protects En no Gyoja. Japan Zeoteus. A son of Tricolonus, and founder of the town of Zoetia in Arcadia. Zephon [scarcher of secrets ]. The cherub despatched by Gabriel to find Satan, after his flight from hell. Ithuriel goes with him. Milton: Paradise Lost, iv. Zephyritis. A surname of Aphrodite, derived from the promontory of Zephyrium in Egypt. Zephyrus, the personification of the west wind, is described by Hesiod as a son of Astraeus and Eos. Greek Zervan, Zurvan, Zrvan. The god of time in Persian literature. Identified in the Greek texts with Chronos and, in the Roman world, with Saturn. Zerynthia. A surname of Aphrodite, from the town of Zerinthus in Thrace, where she had a sanctuary said to have been built by Phaedra. Zetes, a son of Boreas and Oreithyia, and a brother of Calais. Zetes and Calais, called the Boreadae, are mentioned among the Argonauts ( Apollodorus i.), and are generally described as winged beings though some say that they had wings at their heads and feet and others that they had them only at their feet or at their shoulders. Greek Zethus, a son of Zeus and Antiope, at Thebes, and a brother of Amphion. According to some he was married to Aedon, and according to others to Thebe. Greek Zeus, the greatest of the Olympian gods, and the father of gods and men, was a son of Cronus and Rhea, a brother of Poseidon, Hades (Pluto), Hestia, Demeter, Hera, and at the same time married to his sister Hera. Greek Zeuxippe, a sister of Pasithea or Praxithea, was a Naiad and married to Pandion, by whom she became the mother of Procne, Philomela, Erechtheus and Butes. Greek Zha-Zha. Angels which come against those who send the evil eye against the Baptized. Early Nazorean Zhir u Zahrun, means "the Illuminated and the Illuminating." Early Nazorean
Iasion Greek Also called Iasius, was, according to some, a son of Zeus and Electra, tLe daughter of Atlas, and a brother of Dardanus (Theogony of Hesiod 970 ) but others called him a son of Corythus and Electra, of Zeus and the nymph Hemera, or of Ilithyius, or of Minos and the nymph Pyronia.Greek
Ignis Fatuus Russian According to a Russian superstition, these wandering fires are the spirits of still-born children which flit between heaven and the Inferno.
Immat Islam Ensures the balance between the shariah or the exoteric aspect of the faith, and its esoteric, spiritual essence. Neither the exoteric nor the esoteric obliterates the other. While the Imam is the path to a believer's inward, spiritual elevation, he is also the authority who makes the shariah relevant according to the needs of time and universe. Islam
Inachus Greek A river god and king of Argos, is described as a son of Oceanus and Tethys. By a Melian nymph, a daughter of Oceanus, or, according to others, by his sister Argeia, he became the father of Phoroneus and Aegialeus, to whom others add Io, Argos Panoptes, and Phegeus or Pegeus. Greek
Iole Greek The last beloved of Heracles, and a daughter of Eurytus of Oechalia. According to some writers, she was a half-sister of Dryope.
Iphigeneia Greek According to the most common tradition, a daughter of Agamemnon and Clytaemnestra but, according to others, a daughter of Theseus and Helena, and brought up by Clytaemnestra only as a foster-child. Agamemnon had once killed a stag in the grove of Artemis, or had boasted that the goddess herself could not hit better, or, according to another story, in the year in which Iphigeneia was born, he had vowed to sacrifice the most beautiful thing which that year might produce, but had afterwards neglected to fulfil his vow.Greek
Ithome Greek A nymph from whom the Messenian hill of Ithome derived its name. According to a Messenian tradition, Ithome and Neda, from whom a small river of the country derived its name, were said to have nursed Zeus, and to have bathed the infant god in the well Clepsydra. Greek
Ixion Greek A son of Phlegyas or, according to others, a son of Antion by Perimela, of Pasion, or of Ares. According to the common tradition, his mother was Dia, a daughter of Deioneus. He was king of the Lapithae or Phlegyes, and the father of Peirithous. He was bound to a revolving wheel of fire in the Infernal regions, for his impious presumption in trying to imitate the thunder of heaven. Greek
Jambuscha Hebrew Adam's preceptor, according to the pre-Adamites. Sometimes called Boan, and sometime Zagtith. Hebrew
Japetus Greek A son of Uranus and Ge, a Titan and brother of Cronus, Oceanus, Coeus, Hyperion, Tethys, Rhea, etc. According to Apollodorus he married Asia, the daughter of his brother Oceanus, and became by her the father of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius, who was slain by Zeus in the war against the Titans, and shut up in Tartarus. Greek
Jinn Arabian A sort of fairies in Arabian mythology, the offspring of fire. They propagate their species like human beings, and are governed by a race of kings named Suleyman, one of whom built the pyramids. Their chief abode is the mountain Kaf, and they appear to men under the forms of serpents, dogs, cats, monsters, or even human beings, and become invisible at pleasure. The evil jinn are hideously ugly, but the good are exquisitely beautiful. According to fable, they were created from fire two thousand years before Adam was made of earth. The singular of jinn is jinnee.
Juok Africa / Egypt Juok of the Shilluks. Juok molded all men of earth while he wandered the earth creating the rest of the world. White men were created from white sand which Juok found in the land of the white. Red or brown men were created out of the mud of the Nile in Egypt. Black men were created from black earth found in the land of the Shilluck. According to this creation story, man was given all necessary parts to function. Each part had a reason for being. For example, Juok gave man arms in order for man to work. Africa
Kaitabha and Madhu Hindu Kaitabha and Madhu were two horrible demons who, according to Mahabharata and the sprang from the ear of Vishnu while he was asleep. Hindu
Khoromozitel Slavic A house spirit in Slavic folklore. They are masculine, typically small, and sometimes covered in hair all over. According to some traditions, they take on the appearance of current or former owners of the house and have a grey beard, sometimes with tails or little horns.
Kneph Egypt Was originally the breath of life, his name meaning soul-breath. Indeed, according to Plutarch and Diodorus, kneph was identical with the Greek pneuma. Kneph in this context was a spirit that breathed life into things, giving them form. Egypt Kneph eventually became considered to be the creator god himself, in Elephantine, although his identity was finally assimilated into the more important god Amun.
Kulika Buddhist According to Buddhist legend, the first notable king of Shambhala, King Suchandra was the one who requested teaching from the Buddha that would allow him to practice the dharma without renouncing his worldy enjoyments and responsibilities.
Lalli Finland Finn who slew Bishop Henry on the ice of Lake Kцyliц, according to a legend.
Lamia Greek A female phantom, by which children were frightened. According to tradition, she was originally a Libyan queen, of great beauty and a daughter of Belus. She was beloved by Zeus, and Hera in her jealousy robbed her of her children. Lamia, from revenge and despair, robbed others of their children, and murdered them; and the savage cruelty in which she now indulged rendered her ugly, and her face became fearfully distorted. Zeus gave her the power of taking her eyes out of her head, and putting them in again. Greek
Larvae Roman Mischievous spectres. The larva or ghost of Caligula was often seen, according to Suetonius, in his palace. Roman
Lausus Greek 1. A son of Mezentius, who was slain while defending his father against Aeneas. (The Aeneid Book VII) According to the author of the De Orig. Gent. Rom., Lausus fell at a later time, during the siege of Lavinium, by the hand of Ascanius. 2. A son of Numitor and brother of Ilia, was fraudulently killed by Amulius. Greek
Leto Greek In Latin Latona, according to Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod), a daughter of the Titan Coeus and Phoebe, a sister of Asteria, and the mother of Apollo and Artemis by Zeus, to whom, she was married before Hera. Greek
Lia Fail Celtic The Fatale Marmor or Stone of Destiny. On, this stone the ancient Irish kings sat at their coronation, and according to tradition, wherever that stone might be the people there would be dominant. It was removed to Scone; and Edward removed it from Scone Abbey to London. It is kept in Westminster Abbey under who royal throne, on which the English sovereigns sit at their coronation. Celtic
Limbus Patrum Roman The half-way house between earth and heaven, where the patriarchs and prophets, after death, await the coming of Messiah. According to the Roman Catholic notion, this is the "hell," or hades, into which Jesus Christ descended after He gave up the ghost on the cross.
Locrus Greek 1. A son of Physcius and grandson of Amphictyon, became by Cabya the father of Locrus, the mythical ancestor of the Ozolian Locrians. According to some the wife of the former Locrus was called Cambyse or Protogeneia. 2. A son of Zeus and Maera, the daughter of the Argive king Proetus arid Antaia. Greek
Lyre Greek A lyre is a stringed musical instrument well known for its use in Classical Antiquity. The recitations of the Ancient Greeks were accompanied by it. According to ancient Greek mythology, the young god Hermes created the lyre from the body of a large tortoise shell (khelus) which he covered with animal hide and antelope horns. Lyres were associated with Apollonian virtues of moderation and equilibrium, contrasting the Dionysian pipes which represented ecstasy and celebration. Greek
Macar or Macareus Greek 1. A son of Helios and Rhodes, or, according to others, a son of Crinacus, who after the murder of Tenages fled from Rhodes to Lesbos. Greek
Magi Christian According to Christian fable, were Melchior, Gaspar, and Balthazar, three kings of the East. The first offered gold, the emblem of royalty, to the infant Jesus; the second, frankincense, in token of divinity; and the third, myrrh, in prophetic allusion to the persecution unto death which awaited the "Man of Sorrows."
Medeia Greek A daughter of Aeetes by the Oceanid Idyia, or, according to others, by Hecate, the daughter, of Perses. Greek
Melampus Greek A son of Amythaon by Eidomene, or according to others, by Aglaia or Hhodope and a brother of Bias. He was looked upon by the ancients as the first mortal that had been endowed with prophetic powers, as the person that first practised the medical art, and established the worship of Dionysus in Greece. Greek
Melaneus Greek A son of Apollo, and king of the Dryopes, He was the father of Eurytus and a famous archer. According to a Messenian legend Melaneus came to Perieres who assigned to him a town as his habitation which he called Oechalia, after his wife's name. Greek
Mimallones Greek The Macedonian name of the Bacchantes, or, according to others, of Bacchic Amazons. Greek
Minotaurus Greek A monster with a human body and a bull's head, or, according to others, with the body of an ox and a human head, is said to have been the offspring of the intercourse of Pasiphae with the bull sent from the sea to Minos, who shut him up in the Cnossian labyrinth, and fed him with the bodies of the youths and maidens whom the Athenians at fixed times were obliged to send to Minos as tribute. The monster was slain by Theseus. Greek
Moirai Greek Properly signifies "a share," and as a personification "the deity who assigns to every man his fate or his share," or the Fates. Homer usually speaks of only one Moira, and only once mentions the Motpai in the plural. In his poems Moira is fate personified, which, at the birth of man, spins out the thread of his future life, follows his steps, and directs the consequences of his actions according to the counsel of the gods. Homer thus, when he personifies Fate, conceives her as spinning, an act by which also the power of other gods over the life of man is expressed. Greek
Monkir and Nakir Arabic According to Mahometan mythology, are two angels who interrogate the dead immediately they are buried. The first two questions they ask are, "Who is your Lord?" and "Who is your prophet?" Their voices are like thunder, their aspects hideous, and those not approved of they lash into perdition with whips half-iron and half-flame.
Mot 'Death' Phoenicia Son of 'El, according to instructions given by the god Hadad (Ba‘al) to his messengers, lives in a city named hmry ('Mirey'), a pit is his throne, and Filth is the land of her heritage. Phoenicia
Mowis Indian The bridegroom of snow, who, according to American Indian tradition, wooed and won a beautiful bride; but when morning dawned, Mowis left the wigwam, and melted into the sunshine. The bride hunted for him night and day in the forests, but never saw him more.
Nascio Roman A Roman divinity, presiding over the birth of children, and accordingly a goddess assisting Lucina in her functions, and analogous to the Greek Eileithyia. Roman
Nestor Greek A son of Neleus and Chloris of Pylos in Triphylia, and husband of Eurydice (or, according to others, of Anaxibia, the daughter of Cratieus), by whom he became the father of Peisidice, Polycaste, Perseus, Stratius, Aretus, Echephron, Peisistratus, Antilochus, and Thrasymedes. Greek
Niobe Greek 1. A daughter of Phoroneus, and by Zeus the mother of Argus and Pelasgus. In other traditions she is called the mother of Phoroneus and wife of Inachus. 2. A daughter of Tantalus by the Pleiad Taygete or the Hyad Dione, or, according to others, a daughter of Pelops and the wife of Zethus or Alalcomeneus, while Parthenius relates quite a different story, for he makes her a daughter of Assaon and the wife of Philottus, and relates that she entered into a dispute with Leto about the beauty of their respective children. Greek
Nireus Greek 1. A son of Charopus and Aglaia, was, next to Achilles, the handsomest among the Greeks at Troy, but unwarlike. He came from the island of Syme (between Rhodes and Cnidus), and commanded only three ships and a small number of men. According to Diodorus he also ruled over a part of Cnidus, and he is said to have been slain by Eurypylus or Aeneias. His beauty became proverbial.
Oceanus Greek The god of the river Oceanus, by which, according to the most ancient notions of the Greeks, the whole earth was surrounded. An account of this river belongs to mythical geography, and we shall here confine ourselves to describing the place which Oceanus holds in the ancient cosmogony. Greek
Oebalus Greek 1. A son of Cynortes, and husband of Gorgophone, by whom he became the father of Tyndareus, Peirene, and Arene, was king of Sparta. According to others he was a son of Perieres and a grandson of Cynortas, and was married to the nymph Bateia, by whom he had several children (Apollodorus iii). The patronymic Oebalides is not only applied to his descendants, but to the Spartans generally, and hence it occurs as an epithet or surname of Hyacinthus, Castor, Pollux and Helena. 2. A son of Telon by a nymph of the stream Sebethus, near Naples. Telon, originally a king of the Teleboans, had come from the island of Taphos to Capreae, in Italy and Oebalus settled in Campania. (The Aeneid Book VII) Greek
Oenomaus Greek A son of Ares and Harpina, the daughter of Asopus, and husband of the Pleiad Sterope, by whom he became the father of Hippodameia, was king of Pisa in Elis. According to others he was a son of Ares and Sterope, or a son of Alxion, or of Hyperochus and Sterope. Greek
Oewiros Greek A personification of dream, and in the plural of dreams. According to Homer Dreams dwell on the dark shores of the western Oceanus, and the deceitful dreams come through an ivory gate, while the true ones issue from a gate made of horn. Hesiod (Theogony. 212) calls dreams the children of night, and Ovid, who calls them children of Sleep, mentions three of them by name, viz. Morpheus, Icelus or Phobetor, and Phantasus. Euripides called them sons of Gaea, and conceived them as genii with black wings. Greek
Og Hebrew King of Bashan, according to Rabbinical mythology, was an antediluvian giant, saved from the flood by climbing on the roof of the ark. After the passage of the Red Sea, Moses first conquered Sihon, and then advanced against the giant Og (whose bedstead, made of iron, was above 15 feet long and nearly 7 feet broad, Deut. iii. 11). The Rabbins say that Og plucked up a mountain to hurl at the Israelites, but he got so entangled with his burden, that Moses was able to kill him without much difficulty.
Omphale Greek A daughter of the Lydian king Jardanus, and wife of Tmolus, after whose death she undertook the government herself. When Heracles, in consequence of the murder of Iphitus, was ill of a serious disease, and received the oracle that he could not be released unless he served some one for wages for the space of three years, Hermes, accordingly, sold Heracles to Omphale, by whom he became the father of several children. Greek
Ops Roman A female Roman divinity of plenty and fertility, as is indicated by her name, which is connected with opimus opulentus, inops, and copia. She was regarded as the wife of Saturnus, and, accordingly, as the protectress of every thing connected with agriculture. Her abode was in the earth, and hence those who invoked her, or made vows to her, used to touch the ground, and as she was believed to give to human beings both their place of abode and their food, newly-born children were recommended to her care.
Oraios Christian Seven appeared in chaos, androgynous. They have their masculine names and their feminine names. The feminine name is Pronoia (Forethought) Sambathas, which is 'week'. And his son is called Yao: his feminine name is Lordship. Sabaoth: his feminine name is Deity. Adonaios: his feminine name is Kingship. Elaios: his feminine name is Jealousy. Oraios: his feminine name is Wealth. And Astaphaios: his feminine name is Sophia (Wisdom). These are the seven forces of the seven heavens of chaos. And they were born androgynous, consistent with the immortal pattern that existed before them, according to the wish of Pistis: so that the likeness of what had existed since the beginning might reign to the end. Christian/Gnostic. The Nag Hammadi
Ormusd or Ormuzd Magian The principle or angel of light and good, and creator of all things, according to the Magian system.
Orotalt Greek According to the Greek writers, was the Bacchus of the ancient Arabs. This, however, is a mistake, for the word is a corruption of Allah Taala; God the Most High.
Osiris Egyptian The great Egyptian divinity, and husband of Isis. According to Herodotus they were the only divinities that were worshipped by all the Egyptians (Herodotus ii). Osiris is described as a son of Rhea and Helios. Osiris was the god of the Nile.
Otos Greek A giant, brother of Ephialtes. Both brothers grew nine inches every month. According to Pliny, Otos was forty-six cubits (sixty-six feet) in height. Greek
Ourea Greek The Protogenoi of the mountains, and according to the Theogony of Hesiod, children of Gaia and the Greek personifications of mountains. Each mountain was said to have its own god. Greek
Pallas Greek A name of Minerva, sometimes called Pallas Minerva. According to fable, Pallas was one of the Titans, of giant size, killed by Minerva, who flayed him, and used his skin for armour; whence she was called Pallas Minerva. More likely the word Pallas is from pallo, to brandish; and the compound means Minerva who brandishes the spear. Greek
Pandora's Box Greek A present which seems valuable, but which is in reality a curse; as when Midas was permitted, according to his request, to turn whatever he touched into gold, and found his very food became gold, and therefore uneatable. Prometheus made an image and stole fire from heaven to endow it with life. In revenge, Jupiter told Vulcan to make a female statue, and gave her a box which she was to present to the man who married her. Prometheus distrusted Jove and his gifts, but Epimetheus, his brother, married the beautiful Pandora, and received the box. Immediately the bridegroom opened the box all the evils that flesh is heir to flew forth, and have ever since continued to afflict the world. The last thing that flew from the box was Hope. Greek
Paris Greek Also called Alexander, was the second son of Priam and Hecabe. Previous to his birth Hecabe dreamed that she had given birth to a firebrand, the flames of which spread over the whole city. This dream was interpreted to her by Aesacus, or according to others by Cassandra, by Apollo, or by a Sibyl, and was said to indicate that Hecabe should give birth to a son, who should bring about the ruin of his native city, and she was accordingly advised to expose the child. Greek
Penelope Greek A daughter of Icarius and Periboea of Sparta. According to Didymus, Penelope was originally called Ameirace, Arnacia, or Arnaea, and Nauplius or her own parents are said to have cast her into the sea where she was fed by sea-birds from which she derived her name. Greek
Peri Arabia Delicate, gentle, fairy-like beings of Eastern mythology, begotten by fallen spirits. They direct with a wand the pure in mind the way to heaven. These lovely creatures, according to the Koran, are under the sovereignty of Eblis; and Mahomet was sent for their conversion, as well as for that of man.
Phlias Greek A son of Dionysus and Chthonophyle, also called Phlius, was a native of Araithyrea in Argolis, and is mentioned as one of the Argonauts. (Argonautica) According to Pausanias, he was a son of Ceisus and Araithyrea, and the husband of Chthonophyle, by whom he became the father of Androdamas and Hyginus calls him Phliasus, and a son of Dionysus and Ariadne. Greek
Phocus Greek A son of Ornytion of Corinth, or according to others of Poseidon, is said to have been the leader of a colony from Corinth into the territory of Tithorea and Mount Parnassus, which derived from him the name of Phocis. He is said to have cured Antiope of her madness, and to have made her his wife. Greek
Phoebe Greek Daughter of Uranus and Ge, became by Coeus the mother of Asteria and Leto. According to Aeschylus she was in possession of the Delphic oracle after Themis, and prior to Apollo. Greek
Ping-Deng-Wang China "Sinful souls receive punishment starting from the 1st Tribunal right up to the 8th Tribunal according to the nature and severity of their sins but there are others whose sins are much greater - such more sinful souls are sent to my Tribunal to be judged with impartiality. If, after due consideration. I find that the sin is not too great or serious, I will direct that the soul be sent to the 10th Tribunal to await rebirth. I deal with sinful souls impartially." From: White Sun - Tao of Heaven. China
Plataea Greek A daughter of Asopus, who had a sanctuary at Plataeae which according to some derived its name from her. Greek
Protogeneia Greek 1. A daughter of Deucalion and Pyrrha. She was married to Locrus, but had no children; Zeus, however, who carried her off, became by her, on mount Maenalus in Arcadia, the father of Opus. According to others she was not the mother, but a daughter of Opus. Eridymion also is called a son of Protogeueia.
Quetzalcoatl Aztec A great teacher, according to the traditions of the Toltecs, who came to them from Tullan or Yucatan and dwelt for twenty years among the people, teaching them to follow a virtuous life, to cease all wars and violent deeds of any kind, to abolish human and animal sacrifices and instead to give offerings of bread and flowers. Aztec
Rhadamanthys Greek A son of Zeus and Europa, and brother of king Minos of Crete, or, according to others, a son of Hephaestus. From fear of his brother he fled to Ocaleia in Boeotia, and there married Alcmene. In consequence of his justice throughout life, he became, after his death, one of the judges in the lower world, and took up his abode in Elysium. Greek
Rhea Greek Pefa, Pea, Pefy, or Pe. The name as well as the nature of this divinity is one of the most difficult points in ancient mythology. Some consider 'Pea' to be merely another form of pa, the earth, while others connect it with pew, I flow; but thus much seems undeniable, that Rhea, like Demeter, was a goddess of the earth. According to the Hesiodic Theogony, Rhea was a daughter of Uranus and Ge, and accordingly a sister of Oceanus, Coeus, Hyperion, Crius, lapetus, Theia, Themis, and Mnemosyne. Greek
Rhexenor Greek Two mythical personages, one the father of Chalciope, and the second a son of Nausithous the king of the Phaeacians, and accordingly a brother of Alcinous. (Apollodorus iii) Greek
Rhodos Greek A sea-nymph, according to Diodorus, a daughter of Poseidon and Halia, and sometimes called Rhode. The island of Rhodes was believed to have derived its name from her. Greek
Salus Greek The personification of health, prosperity, and the public welfare, among the Romans. In the first of these three senses she answers very closely to the Greek Hygieia, and was accordingly represented in works of art with the same attributes as the Greek goddess. In the second sense she represents prosperity in general and was invoked by the husbandmen at seed-time. In the third sense Salus is the goddess of the public welfare.
Saturnia Roman A daughter of Saturnus, and accordingly used as a surname of Juno and Vesta. Roman
Scylla Greek And Charybdis, the names of two rocks between Italy and Sicily, and only a short distance from one another. In the midst of the one of these rocks which was nearest to Italy, there dwelt, according to Homer, Scylla, a daughter of Crataeis, a fearful monster, barking like a dog, with twelve feet, six long necks and mouths, each of which contained three rows of sharp teeth. The opposite rock, which was much lower, contained an immense fig-tree, under which there dwelt Charybdis, who thrice every day swallowed down the waters of the sea, and thrice threw them up again: both were formidable to the ships which had to pass between them. Greek
Selene Greek Also called Mene, a female divinity presiding over the months, or Latin Luna, was the goddess of the moon, or the moon personified into a divine being. She is called a daughter of Hyperion and Theia, and accordingly a sister of Helios and Eos (Theogony 371 ; Apollodorus; Argonautica) ; but others speak of her as a daughter of Hyperion by Euryphaessa, or of Pallas, or of Zeus and Latona, or lastly of Helios. Greek
Semele Greek A daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, at Thebes, and accordingly a sister of Ino, Agave, Autonoe, and Polydorus. She was beloved by Zeus and Hera, stimulated by jealousy, appeared to her in the form of her aged nurse Beroe, and induced her to pray Zeus to visit her in the same splendour and majesty with which he appeared to Hera. Greek
Sinis Greek Or Sinnis a son of Polypemon, Pemon or Poseidon by Sylea, the daughter of Corinthus. He was surnamed according to some Pityocamptes, and according to others Procrustes. Sinis was called the Pine-Bender because this was his manner of executing his victims and used to ask travellers to help him bend two pine trees to the ground. Greek
Sirin Russian A mythological creature with the head and chest of a beautiful woman and the body of a bird. According to the myth, they lived near Eden or around the Euphrates River. Russian
Sisyphus Greek A son of Aeolus and Enarete, whence he is called Aeolides. He was accordingly a brother of Cretheus, Athamas, Salmoneus, Deion, Magnes, Perieres, Canace, Alcyone, Peisidice, Calyce and Perimede. Greek
St. Patrick Ireland Patrick and the Serpent. According to tradition, St. Patrick cleared Ireland of its vermin; one old serpent resisted him; but St. Patrick overcame it by cunning. He made a box, and invited the serpent to enter it. The serpent objected, saying it was too small; but St. Patrick insisted it was quite large enough to be comfortable. After a long contention, the serpent got in to prove it was too small, when St. Patrick slammed down the lid, and threw the box into the sea. To complete this wonderful tale, the legend says the waves of the sea are made by the writhings of this serpent, and the noise of the sea is that of the serpent imploring the saint to release it.
Sterope Greek 1. A Pleiad, the wife of Oenomaus, and according to Pausanias a daughter of Atlas.
Su God Mahikari Defined contemporary troubles as an imbalance between good and evil. Furthermore, he designated 2000 AD as a deadline for the task. According to legend, if society does not succeed at this task, Su God has promised to incinerate the world at this time. Mahikari
Sun Celtic Called in Celtic mythology Sunna, lives in constant dread of being devoured by the wolf Fenris. It is this contest with the wolf to which eclipses are due. According to this mythology, the sun has a beautiful daughter who will one day reign in place of her mother, and the world will be wholly renovated.
Talos Greek A man of brass, the work of Hephaestus. This wonderful being was given to Minos by Zeus or Hephaestus, and watched the island of Crete by walking round the island thrice every day. Whenever he saw strangers approaching, he made himself red-hot in fire, and then embraced the strangers when they landed. He had in his body only one vein, which ran from the head to the ankles, and was closed at the top with a nail. When he attempted to keep the Argonauts from Crete by throwing stones at them, Medeia by her magic powers threw him into a state of madness, or, according to others, under the pretence of making him immortal, she took the nail out of his vein and thus caused him to bleed to death. Greek
Tantalus Greek Son of Zeus by Pluto, or according to others a son of Tmolus. His wife is called by some Euryanassa, by others Taygete or Dione, and by others Clytia or Eupryto. He was the father of Pelops, Broteas, and Niobe. Greek
Tartarus Greek According to the earliest Greek views, a dark abyss, which lay as far below the surface of the earth as the earth is from the heavens. Above Tartarus were the foundations of the earth and sea. It was surrounded by an iron wall with iron gates set up by Poseidon, and by a trebly thick layer of night, and it served as the prison of the dethroned Cronus, and of the conquered Titans who were guarded by the hecatoncheires, the hundred-armed sons of Uranus. Greek