A : B : C : D : E : F : G : H : I : J : K : L : M : N : O : P : Q : R : S : T : U : V : W : X : Y : Z :
The correspondence of the Roman and Greek gods   Egyptian gods   God of the sea   Indian goddess   God of water   God of war  

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List of Gods : "Ag o"
NameOriginDescription
Abassi Efik The creator god of the Nigerian Efik people. On the suggestion of his wife Atai Abassi created the first humans; to prevent them from exceed his wisdom, he ordered the first humans to neither procreate nor labor. This prohibition lasted some time, but eventually the first couple did have children and work, for which crime Abassi slew them and set their children against each other.
Abracadabra Assyrians A charm. It is said that Abracadabra was the supreme deity of the Assyrians. Q. Severus Sammonicus recommended the use of the word as a powerful antidote against ague, flux, and toothache. The word was to be written on parchment, and suspended round the neck by a linen thread.
Abundantia aka Abundita Roman Goddess of agriculture, good fortune, prosperity and abundance. Roman
Abundantia/ Abundita Roman A goddess of agriculture & abundance
Acrisius Greek A mythical king of Argos, and a son of Abas and Ocalea (or Aglaea, depending on the author). He quarrelled constantly with his twin brother Proetus, inventing bucklers in the process, and in the end expelled him to Tiryns.
Actaeus Greek A son of Erisichthon, and the earliest king of Attica. He had three daughters, Agraulos, Herse, and Pandrosus, and was succeeded by Cecrops. Greek
Agaliarept Greek A Grand General of Hell, commander of the second legion and possessed of the power to discover all secrets. He commands Buer, Guseyn, and Botis.
Agaman Nibo Haiti Goddess of the dead. Haiti
Agamede Greek A goddess of healing
Agamemnon Greek A son of Pleisthenes and grandson of Atreus, king of Mycenae, in whose house Agamemnon and Menelaus were educated after the death of their father. (Apollodorus. iii. ) Homer and several other writers call him a son of Atreus, grandson of Pelops, and great-grandson of Tantalus.
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Agares Christian One of the fallen angels, of the order of the virtues who governs thirty-one legions, appears riding a crocodile and carrying a sparrowhawk.
Agares / Aguares Greek Agares aka Aguares devil. Wierius' hierarchy states Agares is the demon of courage Grand Duke of the eastern regions of Hell, commander of thirty-one legions.
Agas Iran Demon of illness, especially the eyes. Iran
Agasaya Semitic "The Shrieker," was a Semitic war goddess who was merged into Ishtar in her identity as warrior of the sky.
Agathos Greek Good guardian spirit, the personification of good fortune, Greek
Agave Greek Daughter of Cadmus, and wife of the Spartan Echion, by whom she became the mother of Pentheus, who succeeded his grandfather Cadmus as king of Thebes. Agave was the sister of Autonoe, Ino, and Semele (Apollodorus iii), and when Semele, during her pregnancy with Dionysus, was destroyed by the sight of the splendour of Zeus, her sisters spread the report that she had only endeavoured to conceal her guilt, by pretending that Zeus was the father of her child, and that her destruction was a just punishment for her falsehood.
Agdistes Greek The god who kept the porch of the "Bower of Bliss." He united in his own person the two sexes, and sprang from the stone Agdus, parts of which were taken by Deucalion and Pyrrha to cast over their shoulders, after the flood, for re-peopling the world. Greek
Agdistis Phrygian A mythical being connected with the Phrygian worship of Attes or Atys. Pausanias relates the following story about Agdistis. On one occasion Zeus unwittingly begot by the Earth a superhuman being which was at once man and woman, and was called Agdistis. The gods dreaded it and unmanned it, and from its severed genitalia there grew up an almond-tree.
Age Africa God of animals. Revered by hunters in the savannah regions. Benin, West Africa
Age Fon Benin/ W Africa Revered by hunters he is the god of animals
Agenor Libya A son of Poseidon and Libya, king of Phoenicia, and twin-brother of Belus. (Apollod. ii. 1. § 4.) He married Telephassa, by whom he became the father of Cadmus, Phoenix, Cylix, Thasus, Phineus, and according to some of Europa also. 2 3 4 5 6
Agiel Christians Angels of the Mansions of the Moon.
Agischanak Tlingit The kindly goddess of the Tlingit people of Alaska. A powerful goddess capable of supporting the pillar on which the earth rests.
Agla Hebrew An acronymic, representing the Hebrew phrase: "Ateh Gibor le-Olam Adonai", ie. "Thou art mighty forever,O Lord". Often found in magical or Qabalistic texts.
Aglaia Greek One of the Charites. 2. The wife of Charopus and mother of Nireus, who led a small band from the island of Syme against Troy. Another Agiaia is mentioned in Apollodorus. (Apollodorus. ii)
Aglibol Roman/Syria/Greek/Palmaryia A lunar deity in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. His name means "Calf of Bel" ("Calf of the Lord"). He is depicted with a Lunar disk decorating his head, and sometimes his shoulders. Roman/Syria/Greek/Palmaryia
Agnar Norse A son of King Hraudung and foster-son of Frigg. Norse
Agni India A god of lightning, fire, & the sun & who also mediates between the gods & humans
Agni India God of lightning, fire, and the sun and who also mediates between the gods and humans. India
Agni Hindu Vedic God of fire and guardian of homes. Vedic
Agrat Bat Mahalat Semitic Goddess known for her role as sexual temptress and seductress. According to the Talmud, she is the "spirit of uncleanness". Semitic
Agraulos Greek A daughter of Actaeus, the first king of Athens. By her husband, Cecrops, she became the mother of Erysichthon, Agraulos, Herse, and Pandrosos. 2. A daughter of Cecrops and Agraulos, and mother of Alcippe by Ares.
Agreus Phonecian Lesser God of hunting. Brother of Halieus. Phonecian
Agrios Greek One of the Titans. He was killed by the Parc?. Greek fable.
Agrona Welsh A goddess of strife and war worshipped in Britain. The river Aeron in Wales comes from her name. Welsh
Agros Greek Lesser God of fields, courtyards, viticulture, and wine cellars. Brother of
Agrotera Greek The huntress, a surname of Artemis. At Agrae on the Ilissus, where she was believed to have first hunted after her arrival from Delos, Artemis Agrotera had a temple with a statue carrying a bow. Greek
Agrotes Phonecian Lesser God of the earth, horses, hunting, and wanderers. Appears as a charioteer, sometimes accompanied by packs of dogs. Phonecian
Agu'gux Aleut Lives with his community in a land of snow. Like all other humans, Agu’gux is composed of all he knows and all he has ever known. Aleut
Agwe Benin Mother of the sea Benin
Agwe Benin/ Africa She is the mother of the sea
Agwe Haiti Goddess manifestation of Yemanja Haiti/Vodun
Agwe Haiti/ Vodun A goddess manifestation of Yemanja
Agwe Vodun God of the ocean Vodun
Agweta Haitian Haitian sea goddess. Daughter of Agwe.
Agyieus Greek A surname of Apollo describing him as the protector of the streets and public places. Greek
Ah Bolom Tzacab Mayan Meaning "the lead-nosed god," he was a god of agriculture, thunder and rain. He was depicted with a leaf in his nose. Mayan
Akandoji Shinto This monster had stolen a great deal of gold and silver from the villagers. It was said that he was so terrible that no one dared go against him, to try to recover the riches. Shinto
Alcippe Greek Daughter of Ares and Agraulos, the daughter of Cecrops. Halirrhothius, the son of Poseidon, intended to violate her, but was surprised by Ares, and killed, for which Poseidon bore a grudge against Ares. (Apollodorus iii.)
Alcmaeon Greek A son of Amphiaraus and Eriphyle, and brother of Amphilochus, Eurydice, and Demonassa. (Apollodorus iii) His mother was induced by the necklace of Harmonia, which she received from Polyneices, to persuade her husband Amphiaraus to take part in the expedition against Thebes.
Alcyoneus or Alcion Argonautica Jupiter sent Hercules against him for stealing some of the Sun's oxen. But Hercules could not do anything, for immediately the giant touched the earth he received fresh strength. At length Pallas carried him beyond the moon. His seven daughters were metamorphosed into halcyons. Argonautica
Amaethon Celtic A god of agriculture
Amaethon / Amathaon Celtic Amaethon aka Amathaon ‘great ploughman’, was a son of Don and an agricultural deity. Celtic
Amaltheia Crete The nurse of the infant Zeus after his birth in Crete. The ancients themselves appear to have been as uncertain about the etymology of the name as about the real nature of Amaltheia. Hesychius derives it from the verb to nourish or to enrich, others from firm or hard; and others again from to signify the divine goat, or the tender goddess. The common derivation is from to milk or suck.
Amen aka Amoun Egypt Amun, Amon, Ammon. "Hidden God"; "Great Father." Phallic deity sometimes pictured with the head of a ram and other times pictured as a man with a crown with two tall straight plumes. He rules over reproduction, fertility, generation, wind, air, prophecy, agriculture. Egypt
Amon/ Amun Egypt A god of agriculture, fertility & long life
Amphilochus Greek A son of Amphiaraus and Eriphyle, and brother of Alcmaeon. (Apollodorus iii) When his father went against Thebes, Amphiloehus was, according to Pausanias, yet an infant, although ten years afterwards he is mentioned as one of the Epigoni, and according to some traditions assisted his brother in the murder of his mother.
Anala Hindu/Puranic Is one of the Vasus, gods of the material world. He is equated with Agni, and the name usually used for Agni when listed among the Vasus. Hindu/Puranic
Anat / Athene Greek Anat and Athene In a Cyprian inscription the Greek goddess Athкna Sфteira Nikк is equated with ‘Anat. Anat is also presumably the goddess whom Sanchuniathon calls Athene, a daughter of El, mother unnamed, who with Hermes (that is Anubis) councelled El on the making of a sickle and a spear of iron, presumably to use against his father Uranus. However, in the Baal cycle, that rфle is assigned to Asherah / Elat and Anat is there called the "Virgin."
Anaxibia Greek 1. A daughter of Bias and wife of Pelias, by whom she became the mother of Acastus, Peisidice, Pelopia, Hippothoe, and Alcestis. (Apollodorus) 2. A daughter of Cratieus, and second wife of Nestor. (Apollodorus) 3. A daughter of Pleisthenes, and sister of Agamemnon, married Strophius and became the mother of Pylades.
Ancaeus Greek 1. A son of the Arjadian Lycurgus and Creophile or Eurynome, and father of Agapenor. He was one of the Argonauts and partook in the Calydonian hunt in which he was killed by the boar. (Apollodorus i. 9.) 2. A son of Poseidon and Astypalaea or Alta, king of the Leleges in Samos, and husband of Samia, the daughter of the river-god Maeander, by whom he became the father of Perilaus, Enodos, Samos, Alitherses, and Parthenope.
Andraemon Greek The husband of Gorge, the daughter of the Calydonian king Oeneus, and father of Thoas. When Diomedes delivered Oeneus, who had been imprisoned by the sons of Agrius, he gave the kingdom to Andraemon, since Oeneus was already too old.
Andraste Roman War Goddess who was evoked on the eve of the battle to bring favor, and possibly ritual sacrifices were given to her. Queen Boadicea of the Iceni offered sacrifieces to Andraste in a sacred grove before fighting the Romans on her many compaigns against them.
Angel-year Greek According to Cornelius Agrippa and other occult philosophers, the year of an angel is 365 mortal years.
Angels Greek Geniel, Enediel, Anixiel, Azariel, Gabriel, Dirachiel, Scheliel, Amnediel, Barbiel, Ardefiel, Neciel, Abdizuel, Jazeriel, Ergediel, Atliel, Azeruel, Adriel, Egibiel, Amutiel, Kyriel, Bethnael, Geliel, Requiel, Abrinael, Agiel, Tagriel, Atheniel, Amnixiel - Angels of the Mansions of the Moon. There are twenty-eight angels, who rule in the twenty-eight mansions of the moon.
Angitia Greek Taught the people remedies against the poison of serpents, and had derived her name from being able to kill serpents by her incantations. Greek
Annis . Black Anna, Black Anny, Black Agnes, Cat Anna Britain/Celtic Annis aka Black Anna, Black Anny, Black Agnes, Cat Anna, Leicester witch with very sharp nails who wore a skirt made from the skins of her human prey. Britain/Celtic
Apuat Egypt Aka Upuat. Pictured as Anubis is except he is white or gray instead of black. He guides souls to their place of rest after their hearts are weighed against the feather. Egypt
Aralo Armenia Agriculture "the beautiful one", god Georgia/Armenia/Crimea
Aralo/ Aparajita/ Aray Georgia/ Armenia/ Crimea A god of agriculture
Ataokoloinona Madagascar (What-A-Strange-Thing} son of Ndriananahary, the creator god, who was sent to Earth to look in to everything and to advise on the possibility of creating living beings. He never appeared again. Madagascar
Athena Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks. Homer calls her a daughter of Zeus, without any allusion to her mother or to the manner in which she was called into existence, while most of the later traditions agree in stating that she was born from the head of Zeus. According to the Theogony of Hesiod, Metis, the first wife of Zeus, was the mother of Athena, but when Metis was pregnant with her, Zeus, on the advice of Gaea and Uranus, swallowed Metis up, and afterwards gave birth himself to Athena, who sprang from his head.
Ayiyanayaka Ceylon God of fields and woodland who protects against plague. Northern part of the island of Ceylon.
Aylekete/ Agbe Fon A god of the sea & a member of the Vodun gods
Azacca Haiti God of Farming and agriculture. Haiti
Azeus Greek A son of Clymenus of Orchomenos, father of Actor and grandfather of Astyoche. He went with his brothers against Thebes, to take vengeance for the murder of his father, who had been slain by the Thebans at a festival of the Onchestian Poseidon. Greek
B'alam Agab Mayan "night jaguar," he was the second of the men created from maize after the Great Flood sent by Hurakan. He married Choimha. Mayan
Bab Arabia The founder and prophet of Babism. He was a merchant from Shiraz, who at the age of twenty-five claimed to be the promised Qa'im (or Mihdi). After his declaration he took the title of Bab meaning "Gate". Six years later he was shot by a firing squad in Tabriz.
Balarama Hindu Balarama Hindu god of agriculture and physical strength. Symbolized by the club and the plow.
Balarama India God of agriculture. India
Belus Greek A son of Poseidon by Libya or Eurynome. He was a twin-brother of Agenor, and father of Aegyptus and Danaus. He was believed to be the ancestral hero and national divinity of several eastern nations, from whence the legends about him were transplanted to Greece and became mixed up with Greek myths. Greek
Blemys Indian Along with Orontes, and Oruandes, was a chief of the Deriades who fought against Dionysus in the Indian War.
Botis Hebrew A horrid viper, but when commanded, assumes a human shape, with large teeth and horns. He bears a sharp sword in his hand, discerns past, present and future, and reconciles friends and foes. One of the three demons in the service of Agaliarept. Hebrew
Brahmadaityas Hindu Benign ghosts of Brahmin priests with four faces and four hands. They guard their master against Shiva the destroyer.
Briseis Greek A patronymic from Briseus, and the name of Hippodameia, the daughter of Briseus of Lyrnessus, who fell into the hands of Achilles, and about whom the quarrel arose between Achilles and Agamemnon. Greek
Cadmus Greek A son of Agenor and Telephassa, and brother of Europa, Phoenix, and Cilix. When Europa was carried off by Zeus to Crete, Agenor sent out his sons in search of their sister, enjoining them not to return without her. Telephassa accompanied her sons. All researches being fruitless, Cadmus and Telephassa settled in Thrace. Here Telephassa died, and Cadmus, after burying her, went to Delphi to consult the oracle respecting his sister. Greek
Caer Ibormeith Ireland A daughter of Sid Uamuin and Prince Ethal Anbuail of Connacht. Every alternate Samhain she would change into a swan, in which form she would remain for a year before becoming human again the following Samhain. Ireland
Cakra Hindu Is thought to be a nexus of metaphysical and/or biophysical energy residing in the human body. The New Age movement, and to some degree the distinctly different New Thought movement, have also adopted and elaborated on this belief. Hindu
Campe Greek A monster which was appointed in Tartarus to guard the Cyclops. It was killed by Zeus when he wanted the assistance of the Cyclops against the Titans. Diodorus mentions a monster of the same name, which was slain by Dionysus, and which Nonnus identifies with the former. Greek
Carme Greek A daughter of Eubulus, who became by Zeus the mother of Britomartis. Antoninus Liberalis describes her as a grand-daughter of Agenor, and daughter of Phoenix Greek
Cephalus Greek A Molossian chief, who, together with another chief, Antinous, was driven by the calumnies of Charops to take the side of Perseus, in self-defence, against the Romans. Greek
Charon Greek A son of Erebos, the aged and dirty ferryman in the lower world, who conveyed in his boat the shades of the dead - though only of those whose bodies were buried across the rivers of the lower world. Greek
Chiang China Goddess of agriculture. China
Cihuacoatl-Quilaztli Aztec Creator goddess who helped Quetzalcoatl create the current race of humanity by grinding up bones from the previous ages, and mixing it with his blood. Aztec
Cleolla Greek According to Hesiod, Catalogues of Women, Pleisthenes was a son of Atreus and Aerope, and Agamemnon, Menelaus and Anaxibia were the children of Pleisthenes by Cleolla the daughter of Dias. Greek
Cleopatra Greek 1. A daughter of Idas and Marpessa, and wife of Meleager, is said to have hanged herself after her husband's death, or to have died of grief. Her real name was Alcyone. 2. A Danaid, who was betrothed to Etelces or Agenor. There are two other mythical personages of this name in Apollodorus iii. Greek
Clytemnestra Greek A daughter of Tyndareus and Leda, and sister of Castor, Timandra, and Philonoe, and half-sister of Polydeuces and Helena. She was married to Agamemnon. Greek
Coon Greek A son of Antenor and brother of Iphidamas, who wounded Agamemnon, but was afterwards slain by him. Greek
Crone Ireland Third aspect of the Triple goddess. She signifies old age or death, winter, the end of all things, the waning moon, post-mentrual phases of women's lives. Ireland
Cronus/ Kronos/ Kronus/ Chronos/ Chronus Greek A god of & agriculture who became king of the Titans for a while
Dagon Semitic/Mesopotamia A god of grain and agriculture. Semitic/Mesopotamia
Dahak Persia The Satan of Persia. According to Persian mythology, the ages of the world are divided into periods of 1,000 years. When the cycle of "chiliasms" (1,000-year periods) is complete, the reign of Ormuzd will begin, and men will be all good and all happy; but this event will be preceded by the loosing of Dahak, who will break his chain and fall upon the world, and bring on man the most dreadful calamities. Two prophets will appear to cheer the oppressed, and announce the advent of Ormuzd.
Daityas India A race of giants who fought against the gods because they were jealous of their Deva half-brothers. India
Dancing-water French Which beautifies ladies, makes them young again, and enriches them. It fell in a cascade in the Burning Forest, and could only be reached by an underground passage. Prince Chery fetched a bottle of this water for his beloved Fair-star, but was aided by a dove. French Fairy Tale
Deianira Greek Wife of Hercules, and the inadvertent cause of his death. Nessos told her that anyone to whom she gave a shirt steeped in his blood, would love her with undying love; she gave it to her husband, and it caused him such agony that he burnt himself to death on a funeral pile. Deianira killed herself for grief. Greek
Deiphobus Greek 1. A son of Priam and Hecabe, was next to Hector the bravest among the Trojans. When Paris, yet unrecognized, came to his brothers, and conquered them all in the contest for his favourite bull, Deiphobus drew his sword against him, and Paris fled to the altar of Zeus Herceius.
Delias Greek The sacred vessel made by Theseus and sent annually from Athens to Delos. This annual festival lasted 30 days, during which no Athenian could be put to death, and as Socrates was condemned during this period his death was deferred till the return of the sacred vessel. The ship had been so often repaired that not a stick of the original vessel remained at the time, yet was it the identical ship. So the body changes from infancy to old age, and though no single particle remains constant, yet the man 6 feet high is identical with his infant body a span long. Greek
Demiurge Platonists The mysterious agent which made the world and all that it contains. The Logos or Word spoken of by St. John, in the first chapter of his gospel, is the Demiurgus of Platonising Christians. In the Gnostic systems, Jehovah (as an eon or emanation of the Supreme Being) is the Demiurge. Platonists
Deverra Roman One of the three symbolic beings, Pilumnus, Intercidona, and Deverra, whose influence was sought by the Romans at the birth of a child, as a protection for the mother against the vexations of Sylvanus. Roman
Dias Greek Father of Cleolla, the mother of Agamemnon by Pleisthenes. Greek
E Mayan E. An agricultural divinity and the patron of maize and maize produce. Mayan
Eabani Armenian The companion of Gilgamesh, the first primaeval man who was turning his rugged face towards civilization through the love of a woman. He takes part in the wanderings of Gilgamesh, and fights with him against Ishtar and the heavenly bull sent by Anu to avenge the insulted goddess. Apparently wounded in this struggle Eabani dies. Armenian Mythology
Echeclus Greece A son of Agenor, who was slain by Achilles. A Trojan of the same name occurs in the Iliad. Greece
Echidna Greek A daughter of Tartarus and Ge, or of Chrysaor and Callirrhoe and according to others again, of Peiras and Styx. Half-woman, half-serpent. She was mother of the Chim?ra, the many-headed dog Orthos, the hundred-headed dragon of the Hesperides, the Colchian dragon, the Sphinx, Cerberus, Scylla, the Gorgons, the Lern?an hydra, the vulture that gnawed away the liver of Prometheus, and the Nemean lion. Greek
Eidothea Greek A daughter of the aged Proteus, who instructed Menelaus, in the island of Pharos at the mouth of the river Aegyptus, in what manner he might secure her father and compel him to say in what way he should return home. Greek
Ekchuah Mayan An agricultural divinity who is the Patron of cacao and cacao products. He also has associations with travelers and journeys. Mayan
Elfin India The first fairy king. He ruled over India and America. Middle Age Romance
Encelados Greek The most powerful of the giants that conspired against Zeus. The king of gods and men cast him down, and threw Mount Etna over him. The poets say that the flames of this volcano arise from the breath of this giant. The battle-field of his contest was Phlegra, in Macedonia. Greek
Ephialtes Greek One of the giants, who in the war against the gods was deprived of his left eye by Apollo, and of the right by Heracles. Greek
Erathipa Australian A huge boulder in the shape of a pregnant woman. It is said that the souls of dead children reside within it, and that if a woman of child-bearing age walks by a soul slips from the boulder and into her womb to be reborn. Australian
Ersa and Pandeia Greek 1. The wife of Danaus and mother of Hippodice and Adiante. (Apollod. ii. 1.) 2. A daughter of Cecrops and sister of Agraulos, Pandrosos, and Erysichthon. She was the beloved of Hermes, and the mother of Cephalus. Greek
Eschu Africa/Yoruba The god of mischief, is the son of Lusa and Mahu. He supported Legba in giving power of the loa to a mortal as a force of good against the evil unleashed by their brother Sagbata. Africa/Yoruba
Euneus Greek A son of Jason by Hypsipyle, in the island of Lemnos, from whence he supplied the Greeks during their war against Troy with wine. Greek
Europa Greek The daughter of Agenor, King of Phoenicia, or Telephassa, Her famous brother was Cadmus. She was a beautiful girl who caught the eye of Zeus one day while on the shore at Sidon (Tyre). He transformed himself into a snow-white bull with crescent horns among the herds of Agenor and lay down at her feet as she gathered flowers in the meadows with her attendants. Greek
Eurymedon Greek A Cabeirus, a son of Hephaestus and Cabeiro, and a brother of Alcon. 2. One of the attendants of Nestor. 3. A son of Ptolemaeus, and charioteer of Agamemnon; his tomb was shown at Mycenae. Greek
Euryte Greek A nymph, the daughter of Hippodamas. She married Porthaon and produced Licymnius, Sterope, Agrius and Oeneus. Greek
Faunus Roman The son of Picus and father of Latinus, was the third in the series of the kings of the Laurentes. In his reign Faunus, like his two predecessors, Picus and Saturn, had promoted agriculture and the breeding of cattle among his subjects, and also distinguished himself as a hunter. Roman
Fu-His China God of agriculture/vegetation and inventor of writing. China
Gabamiah Germany Recite the following words: "Gabamiah, Adonay, Agla, O Lord God of Powers, do Thou assist us!" When you see the angel, say in an affable tone of voice: "Blessed Spirit, be thou welcome! I conjure thee once more, in the Name of the Most Holy Adonay, to give me prompt enlightenment about stuff. And if for reasons unknown to us, thou art unwilling to proceed in an audible tone of voice, I conjure thee in the Most Holy Name of Adonay to write upon the virgin parchment here present, between now and to-morrow morning, or at least reveal unto me that which I desire this coming might in my sleep. Solonic goetic rite.
Garanus Italy A shepherd of gigantic bodily strength, who is said to have come from Greece into Italy in the reign of Evander, and slew Cacus. Aurelius Victor calls him Recaranus, but both writers agree in identifying him with the Greek Heracles. Italy
Geras Greek God of old age. A son of Nyx and Erebus, he was depicted as a tiny shrivelled up old man. Geras' opposite was Hebe the goddess of youth. Greek
Grangousier Utopia King of Utopia, who married, in "the vigour of his old age," Gargamelle, daughter of the king of the Parpaillons, and became the father of Gargantua, the giant. He is described as a man in his dotage, whose delight was to draw scratches on the hearth with a burnt stick while watching the broiling of his chestnuts. (Rabelais: Gargantua.)
Gynaecothoenas Greek "the god feasted by Women," a surname of Ares at Tegea. In a war of the Tegeatans against the Lacedaemonian king Charillus, the women of Tegea made an attack upon the enemy from an ambuscade. This decided the victory. The women therefore celebrated the victory alone, and excluded the men from the sacrificial feast. Greek
Halirrhothius Greek A son of Poseidon and Euryte. He attempted by violence to seduce Alcippe, the daughter of Ares and Agraulos, but he was taken by surprise by Ares, who killed him. Greek
Haumia Maori The god of wild or uncultivated foods. Haumia was a son of Rangi and Papa, and agreed to the forced separation of his parents. Because of this he was subjected to the fury of his brother Tawhirimatea, god of winds and storms, who would have killed him if their mother had not hidden him in her body. Maori
Hecate Greek A mysterious divinity, who, according to the most common tradition, was a daughter of Persaeus or Perses and Asteria, whence she is called Perseis. Others describe her as a daughter of Zeus and Demeter, and state that she was sent out by her father in search of Persephone; others again make her a daughter of Zeus either by Pheraea or by Hera; and others, lastly, say that she was a daughter of Leto or Tartarus. Greek
Heitsi-Eibib Namaqua A flood hero deity who "came from the east," landing in the west of Cape South Africa, a very long time ago, with fellow survivors from a sunken kingdom. Namaqua
Hel or Hela Scandinavian Queen of the dead, is goddess of the ninth earth or nether world. She dwelt beneath the roots of the sacred ash (yggdrasil), and was the daughter of Loki. The All-father sent her into Helheim, where she was given dominion over nine worlds, and to one or other of these nine worlds she sends all who die of sickness or old age. Her dwelling is Elvidnir (dark clouds), her dish Hungr (hunger), her knife Sullt (starvation), her servants Ganglati (tardy-feet), her bed Kor (sickness), and her bed-curtains Blikiandabol (splendid misery). Half her body was blue. Scandinavian
Hermione Greek The only daughter of Menelaus and Helena, and beautiful, like the golden Aphrodite. As she was a granddaughter of Leda, the mother of Helena Virgil calls her Ledaea. During the war against Troy, Menelaus promised her in marriage to Neoptolemus and after his return he fulfilled his promise. Greek
Herse Greek 1. The wife of Danaus and mother of Hippodice and Adiante. 2. A daughter of Cecrops and sister of Agraulos, Pandrosos, and Erysichthon. She was the beloved of Hermes, and the mother of Cephalus. Greek
Heva Polynesia The legendary "first woman" who, together with Ad-ima, arrived at the Indian subcontinent after the Great Flood destroyed a former age of civilized greatness. Polynesia
Hinzelmann German The most famous house-spirit or kobold of German legend. He lived four years in the old castle of Hudemuhlen, where he had a room set apart for him. At the end of the fourth year (1588) he went away of his own accord, and never again returned.
Hippothous Greek A son of Cercyon, and father of Aepytus, who succeeded Agapenor as king in Arcadia, where he took up his residence, not at Tegea, but at Trapezus. Greek
Hlesey Norse The abode of Ager. Norse
Ho-Hsien-Ku Chinese One of the `eight immortals' and the virgin of the mountains, goddess of agility, immortality and mother reverence. Chinese
Hubal Arabic An Arab idol brought from Bulka, in Syria, by Amir Ibn-Lohei, who asserted that it would procure rain when wanted. It was the statue of a man in red agate; one hand being lost, a golden one was supplied. He held in his hand seven arrows without wings or feathers, such as the Arabians use in divination. This idol was destroyed in the eighth year of "the flight." Arabic
Hylas Greek A son of Theiodamas, king of the Dryopes, by the nymph Menodice or a son of Heracles, Euphemus, or Ceyx. He was the favourite of Heracles, who, after having killed his father, Theiodamas, took him with him when he joined the expedition of the Argonauts. When the Argonauts landed on the coast of Mysia, Hylas went out to fetch water for Heracles but when he came to a well, his beauty excited the love of the Naiads, who drew him down into the water, and he was never seen again. Greek
I conjure you Egypt O sword, by the three Holy Names, ALBROT, ABRACADABRA, JEOVA! Be thou my fortress and defence against all enemies, visible and invisible, in every magical work. By the Holy Name SADAY, which is great in power, and by these other names, CADOS, CADOS, CADOS, ADONAY, ELOY, ZENA, OTH, OCHIMANUEL, the First and the Last, Wisdom, Way, Life, Virtue, Chief, Mouth, Speech, Splendour, Light, Sun, Fountain, Glory, Mountain, Vine, Gate, Stone, Staff, Priest, Immortal, MESSIAH, Sword, do thou rule in all my affairs and prevail in those things which oppose me. Amen. Ceremonial Magic Zendou Ki. A protecter spirit who, along with Myodou Ki, protects En no Gyoja. Japan Zeoteus. A son of Tricolonus, and founder of the town of Zoetia in Arcadia. Zephon [scarcher of secrets ]. The cherub despatched by Gabriel to find Satan, after his flight from hell. Ithuriel goes with him. Milton: Paradise Lost, iv. Zephyritis. A surname of Aphrodite, derived from the promontory of Zephyrium in Egypt. Zephyrus, the personification of the west wind, is described by Hesiod as a son of Astraeus and Eos. Greek Zervan, Zurvan, Zrvan. The god of time in Persian literature. Identified in the Greek texts with Chronos and, in the Roman world, with Saturn. Zerynthia. A surname of Aphrodite, from the town of Zerinthus in Thrace, where she had a sanctuary said to have been built by Phaedra. Zetes, a son of Boreas and Oreithyia, and a brother of Calais. Zetes and Calais, called the Boreadae, are mentioned among the Argonauts ( Apollodorus i.), and are generally described as winged beings though some say that they had wings at their heads and feet and others that they had them only at their feet or at their shoulders. Greek Zethus, a son of Zeus and Antiope, at Thebes, and a brother of Amphion. According to some he was married to Aedon, and according to others to Thebe. Greek Zeus, the greatest of the Olympian gods, and the father of gods and men, was a son of Cronus and Rhea, a brother of Poseidon, Hades (Pluto), Hestia, Demeter, Hera, and at the same time married to his sister Hera. Greek Zeuxippe, a sister of Pasithea or Praxithea, was a Naiad and married to Pandion, by whom she became the mother of Procne, Philomela, Erechtheus and Butes. Greek Zha-Zha. Angels which come against those who send the evil eye against the Baptized. Early Nazorean Zhir u Zahrun, means "the Illuminated and the Illuminating." Early Nazorean
Iapis or Iapyx Greek Was a son of Iasus, and a favourite of Apollo, who wanted to confer upon him the gift of prophecy and the lyre, but Iapis, wishing to prolong the life of his father, preferred the more tranquil art of healing to all the others. He also cured Aeneas of the wound he had received in the war against La- tinus. Greek
Iasus 1 Greek A son of Phoroneus, and brother of Pelasgus and Agenor, or Arestor.
Iasus 2 Greek A son of Argus and Evadne, a daughter of Strymon, or a son of Peitho, the father of Agenor, and father of Argus Panoptes.
Iasus 5 Greek A son of Triopas, grandson of Phorbas, and brother of Agenor.
Idavold Norse A plain where the gods first assemble, where they establish their heavenly abodes, and where they assemble again after Ragnarok. The plains of Ida. Norse
Idothea aka Eidothea Greek The nymph, a daughter of the aged Proteus, who instructed Menelaus, in the island of Pharos at the mouth of the river Aegyptus, in what manner he might secure her father and compel him to say in what way he should return home. Greek
Improcitor Roman A minor god of agriculture that worried over harrowing of the fields
Inari Japan/Shinto God of fertility, rice, agriculture, and foxes. Inari's foxes, or kitsune, are pure white and act as his messengers. Japan/Shinto
Intercidona Roman One of the Deverra, three symbolic beings whose influence was sought by the Romans, at the birth of a child, as a protection for the mother against the vexations of Sylvanus. Roman
Intonsus Greek I. e. unshorn, a surname of Apollo and Bacchus, alluding to the eternal youth of these gods, as the Greek youths allowed their hair to grow until they attained the age of manhood, though in the case of Apollo it may also allude to his being the god of the sun, whence the long floating hair would indicate the rays of the sun. Greek
Iphigeneia Greek According to the most common tradition, a daughter of Agamemnon and Clytaemnestra but, according to others, a daughter of Theseus and Helena, and brought up by Clytaemnestra only as a foster-child. Agamemnon had once killed a stag in the grove of Artemis, or had boasted that the goddess herself could not hit better, or, according to another story, in the year in which Iphigeneia was born, he had vowed to sacrifice the most beautiful thing which that year might produce, but had afterwards neglected to fulfil his vow.Greek
Japetus Greek A son of Uranus and Ge, a Titan and brother of Cronus, Oceanus, Coeus, Hyperion, Tethys, Rhea, etc. According to Apollodorus he married Asia, the daughter of his brother Oceanus, and became by her the father of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius, who was slain by Zeus in the war against the Titans, and shut up in Tartarus. Greek
Jw Buddhist Ja'u, Jawi. Possibly a part of the syncretistic Agami Jawi. Many Hindu-Buddhist gods, called dewata with Sanskrit names, are incorporated in Agami Jawi. Dewi Sri comes from Sri, the consort of Vishnu, and in Java is the goddess of fertility and rice.
Kakaku Japan God of rivers invoked to protect houses against fire Japan/Shinto
Kali India 'The black.' In Vedic days this name was associated with Agni (fire), who has seven flickering tongues of flame for devouring oblations of butter. Of these seven, Kali was the black or terrific tongue. India
Kaliyuga Hindu The last of the four Hindu periods contained in the great Yuga, equal to the Iron Age of classic mythology. It consisted of 432,000 solar-sidereal years, and began 3,102 years before the Christian era. The bull, representing truth and right, has but one foot in this period, because all the world delights in wickedness.
Kanat-Nit'ufta Nazorean Kanat is the title of a Ruling Goddess in the Nazorean Heavens. Nitufta again means "drop" or formed impregnated seed. Early Nazorean
Karttikeya Hindu The son of Siva or Rudra, and to have been produced without the intervention of a woman. Siva cast his seed into fire, and it was afterwards received by the Ganges: Karttikeya was the result; hence he is called Agnibhu and Gangaja. Hindu
Keret Phonecian A son of El and soldier of the Goddess Sapas, but not very brave. Fought against the Moon God Terah at his father's behest (eventually), but lost. Bought a costly wife: his son, Danel, was a prodigy. Phonecian
Khors Slavic Korsha, Korssa, Chors, Corsa, Xors. A sun or daylight god, he may be synonymous with Dazhbog and Bielbog. He was invoked him for hunting and against diseases. Slavic
Kiki Greek The underlying flow of spirit and creativity that are inseperable, embracing the cycles of Life and Death and the freedom of honoring the ancient, wild, inner woman. New Age
Knaritja Australia The earth and the sky had always existed and had always been the home of Supernatural Beings. The western Aranda believe that the sky is inhabited by an emu-footed Great Father (Knaritja), who is also the Eternal Youth (altjira nditja). He has dog-footed wives and many sons and daughters. "They lived on fruits and vegetable foods in an eternally green land, unaffected by droughts, through which the Milky Way flowed like a broad river...".' They have an Eden-like place where only trees, fruits and flowers flourish. All these sky-dwellers are seen as ageless and beyond death. The Aranda, Australia
Kokopelli S America A fertility deity, usually depicted as a humpbacked flute player (often with a huge phallus and antenna-like protrusions on his head), who has been venerated by many Native American cultures in the Southwestern United States. Like most fertility deities, Kokopelli presides over both childbirth and agriculture. He is also a trickster god and represents the spirit of music.
Koolukoolwani Africa "It is agreed among the Zoolus, that their forefathers believed in the existence of an overruling spirit, whom they called Villenangi [Umvelinqangi] (literally the First Appearer), and who soon after created another heavenly being of great power, called Koolukoolwani, [Unkulunkulwana,] who once visited this earth, in order to publish the news (as they express it), as also to separate the sexes and colours among mankind. Duling the period he was below, two messages were sent to him from Villenangi, the first conveyed by a cameleon, announcing that men were not to die; the second, by a lizard, with a contrary decision. The lizard, having outrun the slow-paced cameleon, arrived first, and delivered his message before the latter made his apperance." Amazulu, South Africa
Krishna Indian The modern deity Krishna is the most celebrated hero of Indian mythology, and the most popular of all the deities. He is said to be the eighth Avatara or incarnation of Vishnu, or rather a direct manifestation of Vishnu himself. This hero, around whom a vast mass of legend and fable has been gathered, probably lived in the Epic age, when the Hindus had not advanced far beyond their early settlements in the north-west.
Kujaku Myoo Buddhist Gives protection against drought and protects against all evil in the Shingo sect of Japan. Buddhist
Kumari Hindu A name of Skanda, god of war. In the Brahmanas the term is applied to Agni. Hindu
Labe Arabian The Circe of the Arabians, who, by her enchantments, transformed men into horses and other brute beasts. She is introduced into the Arabian Nights' Entertainments, where Beder, Prince of Persia, marries her, defeats her plots against him, and turns her into a mare. Being restored to her proper shape by her mother, she turns Beder into an owl; but the prince ultimately regains his own proper form.
Lactanus/ Lactans Roman A minor god of agriculture
Lai Cho China Agriculture god. Not part of the locust cult. China
Laima Latvia And her sisters, Karta and Dekla, were a trinity of fate deities, part of a widespread European and Aegean conception of Destiny in the hands of three ageless ancient women. Latvia
Laksmi Hindu Goddess of agriculture, love, beauty, prosperity, Lotus flowers, wealth, and pleasure Hindu/Puranic/India/Epic
Lamia Greek A son of Bias and Pero, and a brother of Talaus, took part in the expedition of the Argonauts, and in that of the Seven against Thebes. Greek
Lamia Greek A female phantom, by which children were frightened. According to tradition, she was originally a Libyan queen, of great beauty and a daughter of Belus. She was beloved by Zeus, and Hera in her jealousy robbed her of her children. Lamia, from revenge and despair, robbed others of their children, and murdered them; and the savage cruelty in which she now indulged rendered her ugly, and her face became fearfully distorted. Zeus gave her the power of taking her eyes out of her head, and putting them in again. Greek
Laodameia Greek A daughter of Acastus, and wife of Protesilaus. As the latter, shortly after his marriage, joined the Greeks in their expedition against Troy, and was the first that was killed there, Laodameia sued for the favour of the gods to be allowed to converse with him only for three hours. The request was granted: Hermes led Protesilaus back to the upper world, and when Protesilaus died a second time, Laodameia died with him. Greek
Lauka Mate Latvia Laukamat, Goddess of agriculture Latvia
Lauka Mate/ Laukamat Lativa A goddess of agriculture
Lausus Greek 1. A son of Mezentius, who was slain while defending his father against Aeneas. (The Aeneid Book VII) According to the author of the De Orig. Gent. Rom., Lausus fell at a later time, during the siege of Lavinium, by the hand of Ascanius. 2. A son of Numitor and brother of Ilia, was fraudulently killed by Amulius. Greek
Lear Britain A legendary king of Britain, who in his old age divided his kingdom between Goneril and Regan, two of his daughters, who professed great love for him. These two daughters drove the old man mad by their unnatural conduct.
Lestrigons Greek A race of giants who lived in Sicily. Ulysses sent two of his men to request that he and his crew might land, but the king of the place ate one for dinner and the other fled. The Lestrigons assembled on the coast and threw stones against Ulysses and his crew. Greek
Libya Greek 1. A daughter of Epaphus and Memphis, from whom Libya (Africa) is said to have derived its name. By Poseidon she is said to have been the mother of Agenor, Belus and Lelex. 2. A daughter of Palamedes, and by Hermes the mother of Libys. 3. A sister of Asia. Greek
Little-Endians Swift The two great empires of Lilliput and Blefuscu waged a destructive war against each other, exhausted their treasures, and decimated their subjects on their different views of interpreting this vital direction contained in the 54th chapter of the Blun-decral: "All true believers break their eggs at the convenient end." The godfather of Calin Deffar Plane, the reigning emperor of Lilliput, happened to cut his finger while breaking his egg at the big end, and very royally published a decree commanding all his liege and faithful subjects, on pains and penalties of great severity, to break their eggs in future at the small end. The orthodox Blefuscudians deemed it their duty to resent this innovation, and declared a war of extermination against the heretical Lilliputians. Swift
Lono Hawaii Primordial god of agriculture, peace, rain, clouds and the sky Hawaii
Lucifer Babylon Very haughty and overbearing. Lucifer is the name given by Isaiah to Nebuchadnezzar, the proud but ruined king of Babylon: "Take up this proverb against the King of Babylon, and say, ... How art thou fallen, from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning!" (Isa. XIV. 4, 12). The poets feign that Satan, before he was driven out of heaven for his pride, was called Lucifer. Milton, in his Paradise Lost, gives this name to the demon of "Sinful Pride." Christian/Gnostic
Lupercus Roman An ancient Italian divinity, who was worshipped by shepherds as the protector of their flocks against wolves, and at the same time as the promoter of the fertility among sheep, whence he was called Inuus. Roman
Lyterius Roman I. e. the Deliverer, a surname of Pan, under which he had a sanctuary at Troezene, because he was believed during a plague to have revealed in dreams the proper remedy against the disease. Roman
Macaber Arabic The dance macaber. The Dance of the dead (French, dance macabre.) A dance over which Death presides, supposed to be executed by the dead of all ages and conditions. Arabic
Manasa Hindu A naga and goddess of fertility. She is popularly known as the goddess of wish fulfilment and one who protects against snakebite. She is also associated with the earth and higher knowledge. Hindu
Marica Etruscan Goddess of agriculture. Etruscan
Mark Cornwall A mythical king of Cornwall, Sir Tristram's uncle. He lived at Tintagel Castle, and married Isolde the Fair, who was passionately enamoured of his nephew, Sir Tristram. The illicit loves of Isolde and Tristram were proverbial in the Middle Ages.
Marutgana Hindu Maruts, storm deities and sons of Rudra and Diti and attendants of Indra. The number of Maruts varies from two to sixty (three times sixty in RV 8.96.8. They are very violent and aggressive, described as armed with golden weapons i.e. lightnings and thunderbolts, as having iron teeth and roaring like lions, as residing in the north, as riding in golden chariots drawn by ruddy horses. Hindu
Mazikeen or Shedeem Arabian A species of beings in Jewish mythology exactly resembling the Arabian Jinn or genii, and said to be the agents of magic and enchantment. When Adam fell, says the Talmud, he was excommunicated for 130 years, during which time he begat demons and spectres; for, it is written, "Adam lived 130 years and (i.e. before he) begat children in his own image". Genesis v