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List of Gods : "Ana"
NameOriginDescription
Acastus Greek A son of Pelias, king of lolcus, and of Anaxibia, or as others call her, Philomache.
Ala aka Ale Africa Ana, Ani, Chthonic fertility goddess who is also goddess of the underworld linked with a cult of the dead, which rest in her womb . Ibo Eastern Nigeria, West Africa
Alcmene Greek A daughter of Electryon, king of Messene, by Anaxo, the daughter of Alcaeus. According to other accounts her mother was called Lysidice or Eurydice.
Anael Babylon Aka Hanael or Aniel, an angel in Jewish lore and angelology, and is often included in lists as being one of the seven archangels. Haniel is generally associated with the planet Venus. Babylon
Anael Christian The prince of the Archangels and one of the seven angels of creation. He is in charge of Fridays, Venus, the moon and human sexuality. Christian
Anahita Babylon/Egypt Goddess of water and war. Babylon/Egypt
Anahita Persia A goddess of fertility, semen & of water
Anahita Persia "Queen of Heaven", name means "unstained" or "immaculate", was an ancient Persian deity.
Anaitis Persia Goddess of fertility Persia
Anakadundubhi Hindu "Drums", the father of Lord Krishna, a name of Vasudeva called thus because the drums of heaven resounded at his birth. Hindu
Anala Hindu/Puranic Is one of the Vasus, gods of the material world. He is equated with Agni, and the name usually used for Agni when listed among the Vasus. Hindu/Puranic
Ananga Hindu "The bodyless"; it is a name of Kama, god of love. Hindu
Ananke Roman The Protogenos of inevitability, compulsion and necessity and the personification of destiny, unalterable necessity and fate. She was also the mother of Adrasteia and of the Moirae. She was rarely worshipped until the creation of the Orphic mystery religion. In Roman mythology, she was called Necessitas ("necessity"). From Herodotus, The History Book Eight
Ananse Ashanti Creator of the sun, stars, day, moon and night who often intercedes between gods and mortals Ashanti
Ananse Ashanti Africa The creator of the sun, stars, day, moon & night who often intercedes between gods & mortals
Ananta Hindu/ Puranic A snake god & one of the seven snake deities
Ananta Hindu/Puranic The world serpent in Hindu mythology. During the night of Brahma, Vishnu sleeps on coils of prodigious snake, Sesha, also known as Ananta, 'the endless' whose thousand heads rise above the deity like a canopy. This scene and everything in it, the deities’ serpentine couch, the water on which the snake lies, are all manifestations of the primeval essence. Hindu/Puranic
Anantamukhi Buddhist 1 of the 12 Dharnis
Anantesa Hindu Minor deity and one of the eight Lords of of knowledge Hindu/Puranic
Anapel Siberia / Koryak "Little Grandmother" Goddess who presides over birth and reincarnation Koryak
Anasuya Hindu That is, the charity, was wife of an ancient Indian rishi (sage) named Atri. In the Ramayana, she appears living with her husband in a small hermitage in the southern periphery of the forest of Chitrakuta. She was very pious, and always practiced austerities and devotion. Hindu
Anat Hebrew / Israel The goddess ‘Anat is never mentioned in Hebrew scriptures as a goddess, though her name is apparently preserved in the city names Beth Anath and Anathoth. Anathoth seems to be a plural form of the name, perhaps a shortening of bкt ‘anatфt 'House of the ‘Anats', either a reference to many shrines of the goddess or a plural of intensification. The ancient hero Shamgar son of ‘Anat is mentioned in Judges 3.31;5:6 which raises the idea that this hero may have been imagined as a demi-god, a mortal son of the goddess.
Anat Phonecian Major Goddess of battle, bloodshed, and hunting, renowned for her hot temper and excitability. She killed the God Mot (temporarily) for her brother's sake. Daughter of Baal, sister of Aleyin. She appears as a maiden who rides a lion and carries shield, spear, and axe. Phonecian
Anat Ugarit A violent war-goddess and the sister of the great Ba‘al known as Hadad. Warrior virgin, slayer of snakes, goddess of fertility. Ugarit
Anat / Athene Greek Anat and Athene In a Cyprian inscription the Greek goddess Athкna Sфteira Nikк is equated with ‘Anat. Anat is also presumably the goddess whom Sanchuniathon calls Athene, a daughter of El, mother unnamed, who with Hermes (that is Anubis) councelled El on the making of a sickle and a spear of iron, presumably to use against his father Uranus. However, in the Baal cycle, that rфle is assigned to Asherah / Elat and Anat is there called the "Virgin."
Anat in Egypt Egypt Anat first appears in Egypt in the 16th dynasty (the Hyksos period) along with other northwest Semitic deities. She was especially worshipped in her aspect of a war goddess, often paired with the goddess ‘Ashtart. In the Contest Between Horus and Set, these two goddesses appear as daughters of Re and are given in marriage to the god Set, who had been identified with the Semitic god Hadad.
Anat in Mesopotamia Akkadian In Akkadian the form one would expect ‘Anat to take would be Antu earlier Antum. This would also be the normal femanine form that would be taken by Anu, the Akkadian form of An 'Sky', the Sumerian god of heaven. Antu appears in Akkadian texts mostly as a rather colorless consort of Anu, the mother of Ishtar in the Gilgamesh story, but is also identified with the northwest Semitic goddess ‘Anat of essentially the same name. It is unknown whether this is an equation of two originally separate goddesses whose names happened to fall together or whether ‘Anat's cult spread to Mesopotamia where she came to be worshippped as Anu's spouse because the Mesopotamia form of her name suggested she was a counterpart to Anu.
Anat/ Anath Canaan A goddess of war, hunting & love
Anath Phoenicia The chief W. Semitic goddess of love & war
Anatis Egypt Goddess of the moon. Egypt
Anatu Mesopotamia Goddess of the sky and ruler of the earth. Consort of the sky god Anu. Mesopotamia
Anaulikutsai'x Bella Coola A river goddess that oversees the salmon's cycle of life
Anaulikutsaix Pacific Goddess of rivers of ancestral knowledge, spiritual warriors, wisdom, instinct, determination and persistence. Very fond of salmon.
Anaxibia Greek 1. A daughter of Bias and wife of Pelias, by whom she became the mother of Acastus, Peisidice, Pelopia, Hippothoe, and Alcestis. (Apollodorus) 2. A daughter of Cratieus, and second wife of Nestor. (Apollodorus) 3. A daughter of Pleisthenes, and sister of Agamemnon, married Strophius and became the mother of Pylades.
Anaxibia Greek wife of Archelaos.
Anaxithea Greek One of the daughters of Danaus and the mother of Olenus by Jupiter.
Anceta Roman Aka Angizia, Anagtia, Anagtia, Anguitia, Anguitina, Angitia. A healing and snake Goddess who was especially revered by the Marsi, a warlike tribe of people who lived to the east of Rome. Roman
Antu aka Antum Babylon/Akkadia A goddess, the first consort of Anu. They were the parents of the Anunnaki and the Utukki. Antu was replaced as consort by Ishtar or Inanna, who may also be a daughter of Anu and Antu. She is similar to Anat. Babylon/Akkadia
Anu aka Anann Ireland Dana, Dana-Ana, Catana. Mother Earth, Great Goddess, Greatest of all Goddesses. Another aspect of the Morrigu. The fertility Goddess, sometimes she formed a trinity with Badb and Macha. Her priestesses comforted and taught the dying. Fires were lit for her on Midsummer. Guardian of cattle and health. Ireland
Anu/ Anann/ Dana/ Dana Ana/ Catana Irish A mother goddess associated with fertility & the primordial mother
Anunnaki aka Anunnaku Babylon Ananaki, a group of Sumerian and Akkadian deities related to, and in some cases overlapping with, the Annuna (the 'Fifty Great Gods') and the Igigi (minor gods). Babylon
Aqhat Phonecian Mortal and hero, handsome and favoured of the gods, who gave him a divine bow. Anat coveted it and had her henchman Yatpan kill him for it, but the bow was destroyed in the act. Phonecian
Aradvi Sura Anahita Persia Another minor goddess. Persia
Ararat Anatolia The ancient creator goddess
Ardvi Sura Anahita/ Anahita Persia The goddess of rivers & water
Arthapratisamvit Buddhist Goddess of logical analysis. Buddhist
Astrik aka Anastasius Slavic Astericus, Ascrick, Astricus, lesser goddess of deception and illusion. Slavic
Cleolla Greek According to Hesiod, Catalogues of Women, Pleisthenes was a son of Atreus and Aerope, and Agamemnon, Menelaus and Anaxibia were the children of Pleisthenes by Cleolla the daughter of Dias. Greek
Dana/ Donu/ Don/ Ana Welsh/ Irish The mortal Celtic race are her descendants, she is a goddess
Genii of Fire Occultism There are three genii of fire: Anael, king of astral light; Michael, king of the sun; and Sammael, king of volcanoes. Occultism
Hippothoe 4 Greek A daughter of Pelias and Anaxibia
Iphis Greek A young man of humble parentage who died for love of Anaxarete. Greek
Isakakate Crow Ruler of the Anasazi and a god of the heavens and the sky. Crow
Kubai-khotun Anatolian 'Great Mother'; she dwells in the 'tree of life' or under its roots and protects and supports humans and animals. Her milk is the origin of the Milky Way. She was the primordial mother-goddess. Anatolian
Ma Anatolia Mountain Mother and a fertility and vegetation goddess. Anatolia
Ma Cappadocia/ Anatolia/ Turkey A fertility & vegetation goddess
Mah-Abadean Dynasty Persia The first dynasty of Persian mythological history. Mah Abad (the great Abad) and his wife were the only persons left on the earth after the great cycle, and from them the world was peopled. Azer Abad, the fourteenth and last of this dynasty, left the earth because "all flesh had corrupted itself," and a period of anarchy ensued.
Megapenthes Greek A son of Proetus, was king of Argos, and father of Anaxagoras and Iphianeira. He exchanged his dominion for that of Perseus, so that the latter received Tiryns instead of Argos. (Apollodorus. ii.) He is said to have afterwards slain Perseus. Greek
Menelaus Greek A son of Atreus, and younger brother of Agamemnon and Anaxibia. He was king of Lacedaemon, and married to the beautiful Helen, by whom he was the father of Hermione and Megapenthes. Greek
Nascio Roman A Roman divinity, presiding over the birth of children, and accordingly a goddess assisting Lucina in her functions, and analogous to the Greek Eileithyia. Roman
Nestor Greek A son of Neleus and Chloris of Pylos in Triphylia, and husband of Eurydice (or, according to others, of Anaxibia, the daughter of Cratieus), by whom he became the father of Peisidice, Polycaste, Perseus, Stratius, Aretus, Echephron, Peisistratus, Antilochus, and Thrasymedes. Greek
Nsab and Anan-Ns'ab Nazorean Nsab means the implanter or impregnator, Anan Nsab means spouse of the Planter. Fertility deities. Heavenly Helpers of earthly Nazoreans in implanting righteousness, goodness and virtue within others. Early Nazorean
Oshun Ana Yoruba Goddess of love. Yoruba
Pleisthenes Greek A son of Atreus, and husband of Aerope or Eriphyle, the daughter of Catreus, by whom he became the father of Agamemnon, Menelaus, and Anaxibia. Greek
Pratibhanaspratisamvit Hindu A goddess, one of context analysis
Quaayayp Greek The son of the creator of the world, Niparaya, and the virgin Anayicoyondi. North America
Sipylene Anatolia/Symnra Mother goddess worshiped in the Metroon sanctuary. Anatolia/Symnra
Tarhunt Anatolia Weather god Hurrian/Anatolia
Tsaphiel Nazorean Anangel governing the moon. Early Nazorean
Vahagn Armenia Armenia's national god. Some time in his existence, he formed a "triad" with Aramazd and Anahit. Vahagn fought and conquered dragons, hence his title Vishabakagh, "dragon reaper". He was invoked as a god of courage, later identified with Heracles. He was also a sun-god, rival of Baal-shamin and Mihr.
Yoni Sanskrit The Sanskrit word for "Divine Passage". The Ayurveda, or Science of Life, described yoni as a part of the female anatomy. Here the term was meant as a designation of respect for women who gave birth, thus contributing to the continuation of the community.
Zababa Akkadian An Akkadian war god. He was also adopted by the Hittites, who brought his worship to Anatolia.