8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Annu" - 47 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Aam"
Egyptian A name for the god Tem, a form of the Sun god in the city of Annu. Book of the Dead åśśociates Aam with the Sun god Ra. Egyptian
Spirit name
"Abonsam"
West African Malevolent spirit. Recognized by tribes in the Gold Coast, etc. Traditionally driven away in an annual expulsion ritual by firing guns and shouting loudly, emptying houses of furniture and beating the interiors with sticks. The abonsam was finally driven into the sea. The ritual was preceded by four weeks of total silence in the area....
Goddess name
"Ala"
Ibo / eastern Nigeria, West Africa Chthonic fertility goddess. A popular deity who is also goddess of the underworld linked with a cult of the dead (which rest in her womb). Her temple is the Mbari which contains a cult statue depicting the goddess seated with a child in her arms and adorned with the crescent moon. She is flanked by attendant deities. She enjoys a profusion of local shrines which are well supplied with votive offerings. Serious crimes including murder are considered to be offenses against her. An annual yam festival is celebrated in her honor. Also Ale, Ana, ANI....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Deities name
"Anunnaki aka Anunnaku"
Babylon Ananaki, a group of Sumerian and Akkadian deities related to, and in some cases overlapping with, the Annuna (the 'Fifty Great Gods') and the Igigi (minor gods). Babylon
Goddess name
"Asnan"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian vegetation goddess. Minor deity probably known to the Sumerians from circa 3500BC or earlier. She is concerned with the abundance of grain in the fields, sent as its protectress by the gods ENLIL and ENKI. According to creation accounts, she and the cattle god LAHAR were first intended to serve the needs of the Annunaki, the celestial children of AN, but when the heavenly creatures were found unable to make use of their products, humankind was created to provide an outlet for their services. Attributes: ears of corn sprouting from her shoulders....
Goddess name
"Atargatis"
Northern Syrian Mother goddess. She enjoyed major cults at Khirbet Tannur, where she is depicted as the vegetation goddess in nine separate variations, and at Khirbet Brak, where she is åśśociated with dolphins. She often carries a cornucopia linking her with the goddess TYCHE (fortune) and may commonly be flanked by lions. She sometimes carries a rudder or wears the mural crown of a city guardian. There are hints of sky affinities in some depictions, with a sign of the zodiac or a nimbus-like veil....
Goddess name
"Atum"
Egypt The first god, having arisen by his own force himself, sitting on a mound (benben), from the primordial waters (Nu). Early myths state that Atum created the god Shu and goddess Tefnut from his √åǧïñå by masturbation in the city of Annu. Egypt
God name
"Avrikiti"
Fon / Benin, West Africa God of fishermen. Statues of this deity, in a sitting position, were placed on the beaches and fishermen and local elders sacrificed to them annually to ensure a good season of catches....
Goddess name
"Caelestis"
Carthaginian / North Africa moon goddess. The Romanized form of the Punic goddess TANIT. Elsewhere she became syncretized into the cult of APHRODITE-VENUS. Annual games were held in her honor. She was brought to Rome in the form of an abstract block of stone (like that of KYBELE from Pessinus) and became popular there during the early part of the third century AD; in this guise she was known as the “mighty protectress of the Tarpeian hill.”...

"Delias"
Greek The sacred vessel made by Theseus and sent annually from Athens to Delos. This annual festival lasted 30 days, during which no Athenian could be put to death, and as Socrates was condemned during this period his death was deferred till the return of the sacred vessel. The ship had been so often repaired that not a stick of the original vessel remained at the time, yet was it the identical ship. So the body changes from infancy to old age, and though no single particle remains constant, yet the man 6 feet high is identical with his infant body a span long. Greek
Goddess name
"Egeria"
Roman Fertility goddess. deity of oak trees whose priestess enacted an annual sacred marriage with the king of Rome, who took the part of JUPITER. The festival is a variation of that celebrating the marriage of ZEUS and HERA which took place in Athens. A number of springs and lakes were sacred to her....
God name
"Faro"
Bambara / Mali, West Africa River god. Regarded as the deity who brought order to the world at the time of creation. He impregnated himself and gave birth to twins who were the first human beings. He is also the progenitor of fish stocks in the river Niger. His chief adversary is the god of the desert wind, TELIKO. Faro is propitiated annually by a Komo society of men in a ritual of dancing. They use a special mask which is created anew each year. According to legend Faro came to earth after a long period of drought during which most of the living things died. He also gave mankind the gift of speech....
God name
"Grannus"
Roman A god of healing affiliated with hot springs & mineral waters
God name
"Grannus"
Roman / Celtic / Continental / Europe God of healing. The name appears across a wide area generally åśśociated with medicinal springs and hot mineral waters, including sites at Aix-laChapelle, Grand (Vosges), Trier, Brittany, and as far distant as the Danube basin. Grannus became syncretized with the Roman god APOLLO as Apollo Grannus, and baths were sometimes called Aquae Granni....
God name
"Grannus aka Grannos"
Celtic God of healing affiliated with hot springs and mineral waters. Celtic

"Hapy"
Egypt A deification of the annual flood of the Nile River. Egypt
Goddess name
"Hapy"
Egypt Fertility god of the Nile flood. Inhabits caverns adjacent to the Nile cataracts and oversees the annual inundation of the Nile valley. His court includes crocodile gods and frog goddesses. There are no known sanctuaries to Hapy. He is depicted in anthropomorphic form but androgynous, with prominent belly, pendulous breasts and crowned with water plants. He may hold a tray of produce. At Abydos he is depicted as a two-headed goose with human body.See also KHNUM....
God name
"Ho-Po"
Taoist / Chinese River god. The so-called “Count of the River,” the deity who controls all rivers but particularly the Yellow River, and who is the subject of an official cult and sacrifice. According to tradition he achieved immortality by weighing himself down with stones and drowning himself. He received an annual sacrifice of a young girl until the end of the Shou Dynasty circa 250 BC. Also Hebo; Ping-Yi....
God name
"Irmin"
Germanic The mythical founder of the Hermiones tribe, son of Mannus, war god, Germanic
God name
"Ithomatas"
Greek A surname of Zeus, derived from the Messenian hill of Ithome, where the god had a sanctuary, and where an annual festival, the Ithomaea was celebrated in his honour. Greek
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.