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The correspondence of the Roman and Greek gods   Egyptian gods   God of the sea   Indian goddess   God of water   God of war  

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List of Gods : "Anu"
NameOriginDescription
Adad Mesopotamia/Babylonn Son of Anu and the god of wind, storm, flood and rain. Giver of life in the fields. Mesopotamia/Babylonn
Amurru Akkadian Or Martu are also names given in Akkadian and Sumerian texts to the god of the Amorite/Amurru people, often forming part of personal names. He is sometimes called Ilu Amurru. Sometimes described as a 'shepherd', and as a son of the sky-god Anu.
Anat / Athene Greek Anat and Athene In a Cyprian inscription the Greek goddess Athкna Sфteira Nikк is equated with ‘Anat. Anat is also presumably the goddess whom Sanchuniathon calls Athene, a daughter of El, mother unnamed, who with Hermes (that is Anubis) councelled El on the making of a sickle and a spear of iron, presumably to use against his father Uranus. However, in the Baal cycle, that rфle is assigned to Asherah / Elat and Anat is there called the "Virgin."
Anat in Mesopotamia Akkadian In Akkadian the form one would expect ‘Anat to take would be Antu earlier Antum. This would also be the normal femanine form that would be taken by Anu, the Akkadian form of An 'Sky', the Sumerian god of heaven. Antu appears in Akkadian texts mostly as a rather colorless consort of Anu, the mother of Ishtar in the Gilgamesh story, but is also identified with the northwest Semitic goddess ‘Anat of essentially the same name. It is unknown whether this is an equation of two originally separate goddesses whose names happened to fall together or whether ‘Anat's cult spread to Mesopotamia where she came to be worshippped as Anu's spouse because the Mesopotamia form of her name suggested she was a counterpart to Anu.
Anatu Mesopotamia Goddess of the sky and ruler of the earth. Consort of the sky god Anu. Mesopotamia
Anqet Egypt/Libya Aka Anuket, Anukis, "The Clasper." Water Goddess of the Nile Cataracts. Her symbal was the cowrie shell. Pictured as a woman donning a tall plumed crown. Also has been depicted as having four arms. Rules Over: Producer and giver of life, water. Egypt/Libya
Anshur aka Ashur Akkadian Or Asshur, a sky god and the husband of his sister Kishar ("earth axle"); they are the children of the serpents Lahmu and Lahamu, and the parents of Anu and Ea. He is sometimes depicted as having Ninlil as a consort. As Anshar, he is progenitor of the Akkadian pantheon; as Ashur, he is the head of the Assyrian pantheon
Antu aka Antum Babylon/Akkadia A goddess, the first consort of Anu. They were the parents of the Anunnaki and the Utukki. Antu was replaced as consort by Ishtar or Inanna, who may also be a daughter of Anu and Antu. She is similar to Anat. Babylon/Akkadia
Anu aka Anann Ireland Dana, Dana-Ana, Catana. Mother Earth, Great Goddess, Greatest of all Goddesses. Another aspect of the Morrigu. The fertility Goddess, sometimes she formed a trinity with Badb and Macha. Her priestesses comforted and taught the dying. Fires were lit for her on Midsummer. Guardian of cattle and health. Ireland
Anu/ Anann/ Dana/ Dana Ana/ Catana Irish A mother goddess associated with fertility & the primordial mother
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Anu/ Anus Babylon The head of the gods, he had an army of stars to destroy evildoers
Anuanaitu America Soul of the ocean, member of a sea monster family. Goddess of the ocean and whirlpools Caribbean, S. America
Anubis Egypt Aka Anpu, Sekhem Em Pet. Messenger from the gods to humans. Pictured with the head of a jackal or dog, or as a dark colored jackal. He, with Maat, weighed human souls for truth and he rules over Wisdom, intelligence, death, embalming, endings, truth, justice, surgery, hospital stays, finding lost things, anesthetics, medicine, journeys, protection, boats, diplomacy, astral travel, cemeteries. Egypt
Anuket Egypt Goddess of water and of rivers. Egypt
Anukis Egypt Birth goddess and of the cataracts of the lower Nile. Egypt
Anulap Micronesia A god of magic and knowledge in the mythology of Micronesia, who teaches these things to humanity. He is the husband of the creator goddess Ligobubfanu, and may be a creator deity himself.
Anumati Sanskrit A lunar deity and goddess of wealth, intellect, children, spirituality and prosperity. Also Anumati is a type of full moon day in which the moon remains slightly cut and not fully full moon called as Chaturdashi bhiddha purnima Sanskrit
Anunit Chaldea A goddess of the morning star
Anunit aka Anunitu Chaldea The Assyrian and Babylonian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess Astarte. Anunit, Astarte and Atarsamain are alternative names for Ishtar. Chaldea
Anunitu Babylon The goddess of the moon
Anunnaki Babylon The seven judges of the Underworld they began as fertility deities
Anunnaki aka Anunnaku Babylon Ananaki, a group of Sumerian and Akkadian deities related to, and in some cases overlapping with, the Annuna (the 'Fifty Great Gods') and the Igigi (minor gods). Babylon
Anuradha Hindu/Puranic A goddess of good luck. Like her sister, Bharani, she is a daughter of Daksha and a wife of Chandra. Hindu/Puranic
Anus Hurrite The king of heaven who declared war on the father of the gods, he lost
Apuat Egypt Aka Upuat. Pictured as Anubis is except he is white or gray instead of black. He guides souls to their place of rest after their hearts are weighed against the feather. Egypt
Caligorant Egyptian An Egyptian giant and cannibal who used to entrap strangers with a hidden net. This net was made by Vulcan to catch Mars and Venus, Mercury stole it for the purpose of catching Chloris, and left it in the temple of Anubis; Caligorant stole it thence. At length Astolpho blew his magic horn, and the giant ran affrighted into his own net, which dragged him to the ground. Whereupon Astolpho made the giant his captive, and despoiled him of his net.
Cred aka Creide Ireland/Scotland Fairy Queen Goddess who is associated with Dana's mountains, the Paps of Anu. She vowed never to sleep until she found a man who could create for her the most majestic poem ever penned. Ireland/Scotland
Dimme Sumeria Female demon of fever and and diseases of infants. There were seven evil spirits of this kind, who were apparently regarded as being daughters of Anu, the god of the heavens. Sumeria
Eabani Armenian The companion of Gilgamesh, the first primaeval man who was turning his rugged face towards civilization through the love of a woman. He takes part in the wanderings of Gilgamesh, and fights with him against Ishtar and the heavenly bull sent by Anu to avenge the insulted goddess. Apparently wounded in this struggle Eabani dies. Armenian Mythology
Hermanubis Egyptian A god who combined Hermes with Anubis. He was popular during the period of Roman domination. Depicted as having a human body and jackal head, with the sacred caduceus that belonged to the Greek god Hermes, he represented the Egyptian priesthood.
Igigi Mesopotamia Collective name for the group of younger sky gods. They were the gods of heaven, in contrast to the Anunnaki, who were the gods of the earth. Mesopotamia
Martu Sumeria 'He who dwells on the pure mountain' and is sometimes described as a 'shepherd', a son of the sky-god Anu. Sumeria
Nana Anglo-Saxon Nanna. A pan-cultural cognomen. "Her place as queen of heaven goes back to remote antiquity. She is Venus and appears as Ashtarte (or Easter in the Anglo-Saxon), Nana and Anunitu. She is goddess of fertility and worshipped everywhere. She is daughter of Sin and also of Anu. She is also associated with Sirius. She is goddess of sex and appropriates the attributes of Ninlil and Damkina and as daughter of Sin and from her descent to Hades she is represented by temple prostitution. The lion, normally the symbol of Shamash is associated with her as is the dove. In this sequence, she becomes then associated with Tammuz or Dumuzi, as the bringer of new life in the spring cults." The Golden Calf
Nehebka Egypt Serpent-headed Goddess who aided Anubis in the embalming and funeral rites. Egypt
Netcheh Egypt One of the Seven Spirits appointed by Anubis. Egypt
Set Egypt The son of Seb and Nut, is the brother of Osiris, Isis, and Nephthys; and the father of Anubis by Nephthys. Set stole the light from the sun, resulting in autumn and winter. Egypt
Zicum aka Zikun Babylonian Zigara, the primeval goddess, the mother of Anu and the gods. Babylonian