8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Bearded" - 17 records

Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Deity name
"BES"
Egypt Guardian deity of women in labor. A dwarfish and hideous, but essentially benign deity whose ugliness wards off evil. He is generally present at births exerting a protective influence. Bes appears with a large-bearded and barely human face, a thick body, short arms and short bandy legs....
Deities name
"BRARMA (the creator)"
Hindu / India Creator god. With VIS'NU and SIVA, Brahma is one of a trinity of supreme creator deities in the Hindu pantheon. Brahma is depicted with four heads, often bearded, facing in four directions, and with four hands, sometimes with one of them raised in blessing or promise. As a god of knowledge he often carries the Vedas (earliest Sanskrit mythology said to have sprung from his head) in one of his hands. According to one legendary source he was created from the right side of the primordial creator force....

"Barbata"
Roman The bearded, a surname of Venus among the Romans.
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Demon name
"Bearded Demon"
Hebrew The demon who teaches the secret of the Philosopher's Stone. Hebrew
God name
"Dolichenus"
Western Semitic / Syrian weather god. Depicted bearded and standing upon a bull. Attributes include a double ax and lightning. He became syncretized with the Roman god JUPITER....
God name
"Ebisu"
Shinto / Japan God of luck. The most popular of seven gods of fortune recognized in Shintoism and frequently linked with the god DAIKOKU. He is depicted as a fat, smiling and bearded fisherman holding a fishing rod in one hand and a sea bream in the other. The name does not appear in the clåśśical sacred texts Nibongi and Kojiki, but Ebisu is known to have been worshiped in ancient times among fishermen. From about the sixteenth century his character changed and he became a deity åśśociated with profit. Thus he is a patron of commerce and his picture hangs in most establishments. He is perhaps syncretized with the gods HIRUKO and KOTO-SHIRO-NUSHI. He may also be identified with Fudo, the god of knowledge. He does not join the rest of the Shinto pantheon in the great October festival at Izumo because he is deaf. His festival is celebrated concurrently in his own temple....
God name
"Horagalles"
Lappish weather god. The local embodiment of the Nordic (Icelandic) god THOR. Depicted as a bearded figure carrying a pair of hammers....
Goddess name
"Inar (rice-grower)"
Shinto / Japan God (Goddess) of foodstuffs. The popular name of a god(dess) worshiped under the generic title Miketsu-No-Kami in the Shi-Den sanctuary of the imperial palace, but rarely elsewhere. The deity displays gender changes, develops many personalities and is revered extensively in Japan. Inari is often depicted as a bearded man riding a white fox but, in pictures sold at temple offices, (s)he is generally shown as a woman with long flowing hair, carrying sheafs of rice and sometimes, again, riding the white fox. Inari sanctuaries are painted bright red, unlike most other Shinto temples. They are further characterized by rows of wooden portals which form tunnels leading to the sanctuary. Sculptures of foxes are prolific (an animal endowed, in Japanese tradition, with supernatural powers) and the shrines are decorated with a special device, the Hoju-No-Tama, in the shape of a pear surrounded by small flames. Often identified with the food goddess TOYO-UKE-BIME....
God name
"Lahmu"
Akkadia First-born son of Apsu and Tiamat. He and his sister Lahamu were the parents of Anshar and Kishar, the sky father and earth mother, who begat the first gods. Lahmu was sometimes depicted as a snake, and sometimes as a bearded man with a red sash and six curls on his head. Akkadia
Deity name
"Narada (giver of advice)"
Hindu / Vedic, Epic / Puranic Minor but popular deity. Narada is depicted as a sage who is also a messenger and teacher. Born from the head, or throat, of BRAHMA, and alternatively a minor incarnation of V IS'NU. In various roles he is a guardian deity of women, a musician and a wanderer. Narada, often bearded, is generally depicted standing with the musical instrument which is his invention, the vina (lute). By contrast to his benign nature he is also described as a “maker of strife” and as “vile.” Also Kali-karaka; Pisuna....
God name
"Nethu s"
Etruscan God of fresh water. Identified with wells and springs and depicted as a naked bearded figure. He is probably to be equated with the Roman god NEPTUNUS....
God name
"Nzambi"
Bakongo / Democratic Republic of Congo, central Africa Creator god. He created the first mor tal pair or, in alternative tradition, an androgy nous being in the guise of a palm tree called Muntu Walunga (the complete person). He also endowed this being with intelligence. In wooden sculptures the tree bears a woman's head and breast on one side and a bearded face on the other. Eventually the tree divided into two sepa rate sexes. Also Nyambi; Nzambe; Yambe; Zambi....
Goddess name
"Onuris [Greek]"
Egypt God of hunting and war. Onuris is first known from This, near Abydos in Upper Egypt. In later times his main cult center was at Samannud in the Nile delta. His consort is the lion goddess Mekhit. Onuris is generally depicted in human form as a bearded figure wearing a crown with four plumes and wielding a spear or occasionally holding a rope. He is sometimes accompanied by Mekhit in iconography. Seen as a hunter who caught and slew the enemies of RE, the Egyptian Sun god, some legends place him close to the battle between HORUS and SETH. In clåśśical times, Onuris became largely syncretized with the Greek war god ARES. Also Anhuret (Egyptian)....

"Psilas"
Greek The giver of wings, or "the unbearded," a surname of Dionysus, under which he was worshipped at Amyclae.
God name
"Quirinus"
Roman God of war. One of a triad of warrior gods including JUPITER and MARS. He originated as the tutelary god of the Sabines, living on the Quirinal, one of the seven hills of Rome. His warrior status is primarily one of defense and he is depicted bearded and in a compromise of military and clerical clothing. The myrtle is sacred to him....
God name
"Smertrios"
Celtic / Gallic God of war. The tutelary deity of the Treveri. Allegedly the subject of a votive monument which depicts a bearded god holding a snake....
God name
"Vyasa"
Hindu / Vedic, Epic / Puranic Minor incarnation of the god VISNU. Vyasa is said to be the author of the Vedas, the Mababbarata epic and the Puranas. He ranks with Hyagriva and SARASVATI as a lord of knowledge and wisdom, and is responsible for dividing the Tree of Knowlege into parts. In the texts he is depicted as darkskinned and accompanied by four students, Sumanta, Paila, Vaisampayana and Jaimini. He may be bearded. Also Vedavyasa....

8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.