A : B : C : D : E : F : G : H : I : J : K : L : M : N : O : P : Q : R : S : T : U : V : W : X : Y : Z :
Divorce Is Not 'A Choice'   Read Gods and Monsters   The correspondence of the Roman and Greek gods   Egyptian gods  
God of the sea   Indian goddess   God of water   God of war  

Struggling to write an Essay? We can help!
Provides students with professionally written essays, research papers, term papers, reviews, theses, dissertations and more.
List of Gods : "Bi har"
NameOriginDescription
Aibell Ireland Goddess of Munster whose legends were almost lost until she was 'demoted' to a faery queen. She had in her possession a magickal harp which did her bidding, but which human ears could not hear or else the eavesdropper would soon die. She was associated with stones and leaves. Ireland
Amaltheia Crete The nurse of the infant Zeus after his birth in Crete. The ancients themselves appear to have been as uncertain about the etymology of the name as about the real nature of Amaltheia. Hesychius derives it from the verb to nourish or to enrich, others from firm or hard; and others again from to signify the divine goat, or the tender goddess. The common derivation is from to milk or suck.
Angus Gaelic A Gaelic god of amorous dalliance. A son of Dugda, his harp was so sweet that whoever heard must follow; his kisses became invisible love-whispering birds.
Harpyia Greek That is, "the swift robbers," are, in the Homeric poems, nothing but personified storm winds. Homer mentions only one by name, viz. Podarge, who was married to Zephyrus, and gave birth to the two horses of Achilles, Xanthus and Balius. Greek
Nahual Aztec From the Nahuatl word nahualli which was used to refer to practicioners of harmful magic. In the aztec belief system the day of a persons birth caluclated in the Tonalpohualli would determine the nature of the person - each day was associated with an animal which could have a strong or weak aspect.
Yasi Bolivia The great chief was named Yasi (Moon), and he had a child. One day, a Jaguar was playing rough with the child, and bit it too hard on the head. The young child died, and when Yasi heard of his child’s death, he wanted some answers. Yasi wanted to know who murdered his precious child, but none of the animals would tell. Yasi became so angry that he stretched the necks ofthe howler monkeys, put spines on the backs of porcupines, twisted the feet of the ant eaters, and threw the tortoise down so hard, that it could no longer walk fast. Bolivia