8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Bing" - 20 records

Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼

"Agyieus"
Greek A surname of Apollo describing him as the protector of the streets and public places. Greek
Goddess name
"Badb"
Celtic / Irish war goddess. One of the aspects of the MORRIGAN. Capable of changing shape at will. She confronts the Irish hero Cu Chulainn before a battle and terrifies him by turning into Badb Catha, the crow and harbinger of death....

"He Bo/ Bing Yi"
China He is the Divine ruler of all rivers
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Inana, Istar,Ishtar"
Akkadian / Sumerian The most important of all Mesopotamian goddesses, and a multi-faceted personality, occurring in cuneiform texts of all periods. The Sumerian name probably means "Lady of heaven";, and the Akkadian name Ishtar is related to the Syrian Astarte and the biblical Ashtaroth is usually considered as a daughter of Anzu, with her cult located in Uruk, but there are other traditions as to her ancestry, and it is probable that these reflect originally different goddesses that were identified with her. Ishtar is the subiect of a cycle of texts describing her love affair and ultimately fatal relationship with Tammuz.
Spirit name
"Katajalina"
Australian aboriginal Animistic spirit. Invoked at the ceremony of initiation by the Binbinga people once living on the west side of the Gulf of Carpentaria. Katajalina is reputed to live in an anthill and to carry off the spirit of the young initiate, kill him and then restore him to life as an adult. His presence is announced in the noise of the bull-roarer....
Goddess name
"Macha"
Celtic / Irish Fertility goddess. One of the aspects of the MORRIGAN (a trio of warrior goddesses with strong sexual connotations), she appears as the consort of Nemed and of Crunnchu. She is also a warrior goddess who influences the outcome of battle by magical devices. She can change shape from girl to hag and is generally dressed in red. She is depicted with red hair. She appears thus to the Irish hero, Cu Chulainn, before the Battle of Moytura when she suddenly changes herself into a crow, the harbinger of death. heads of slaughtered soldiers were fixed on the so-called Pole of Macha, and the ancient religious center of Emain Macha in Ulster is named after her.See also Banbha, ERIU and Fodla....
Goddess name
"N ssaba"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian Goddess of writing and wisdom. A daughter of AN and probably orig inally a vegetation deity. Her symbol is the inscribing stylus. She is a patron deity of Unug [Warka]....
God name
"Nabu"
Mesopotamian / Babylonian - Akkadian God of writing and wisdom. The son of MARDUX and ZARPANITU(M), his consort is TASMETU(M). He is symbolized by the inscribing stylus. A major deity in neo-Babylonian times from the eighth century BC onward, with an important sanctuary at Borsippa, near Babylon, known as the Ezida. He is considered a god of mountain regions, described as the “firstborn son of Marduk” and his image is closely involved in the New Year akitu festival. Also NEBO (Vetus Testamentum)....
God name
"Naraaana"
Hindu / Epic / Puranic Creator god. More or less synonymous with VIS'NU, but specifically describing the embodiment of the “abode of man.” He is said to have sucked his toe while sailing the primeval ocean on a banana leaf, until his own inspiration created the world. Often depicted supported by the bird god GARUDA.See also NARA....
God name
"Oceåñuś"
Greek The god of the river Oceåñuś, by which, according to the most ancient notions of the Greeks, the whole earth was surrounded. An account of this river belongs to mythical geography, and we shall here confine ourselves to describing the place which Oceåñuś holds in the ancient cosmogony. Greek
King name
"Og"
Hebrew king of Bashan, according to Rabbinical mythology, was an antediluvian giant, saved from the flood by climbing on the roof of the ark. After the påśśage of the Red Sea, Moses first conquered Sihon, and then advanced against the giant Og (whose bedstead, made of iron, was above 15 feet long and nearly 7 feet broad, Deut. iii. 11). The Rabbins say that Og plucked up a mountain to hurl at the Israelites, but he got so entangled with his burden, that Moses was able to kill him without much difficulty.

"Ogiuwu Edo"
Benin The harbinger of death who is supposed to own the blood of all living things. Benin
God name
"Rsabha (the bull)"
Hindu / Epic / Puranic God. An unusual avatara of VIS'NU. Said to be similar to the Jain deity Rsabhanatha and therefore may represent an attempt to meld the two religions by absorbing Jainism locally....
God name
"Shango"
Yoruba / Nigeria, West Africa Chthonic storm god. As an earth deity he was once a mortal man, the king of Oyo, who transformed himself into an immortal. According to tradition, during his life he breathed tongues of fire. He then ascended into the sky by climbing a golden chain and became the god of thunder and lightning. He is also god of justice, punishing thieves and liars. His consorts include OYA, Oshun and Oba. Cult followers of Shango are believed to be able to make lightning strike an adversary. In shrines to Shango, the image of the god is adorned with a ram's head. Also SANGO....

"Sito"
Greek A surname of Demeter, describing her as the giver of food or corn. Greek

"Stator"
Roman A Roman surname of Jupiter, describing him as staying the Romans in their flight from an enemy, and generally as preserving the existing order of things.

"Telamon"
Roman A surname of Atlas, describing him as the sufferer or bearer of heaven.
Goddess name
"Viriplaca"
Roman the goddess who soothes the anger of man, was a surname of Juno, describing her as the restorer of peace between married people. Roman

"Xenia"
Greek And the masculine Xenios, are epithets of Athena and Zeus, describing them as presiding over the laws of hospitality, and protecting strangers. Greek

"Zygia"
Greek And Zygius, are surnames of Hera and Zeus, describing them as presiding over marriage. Greek

8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.