A : B : C : D : E : F : G : H : I : J : K : L : M : N : O : P : Q : R : S : T : U : V : W : X : Y : Z :
The correspondence of the Roman and Greek gods   Egyptian gods   God of the sea   Indian goddess   God of water   God of war  

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List of Gods : "Bir"
NameOriginDescription
Aboulomri Arab A fabulous bird of the vulture sort which lives 1,000 years. Called by the Persians Kerkes, and by the Turks Ak-Baba. Mohammedan mythology
Aderyn y Corph Welsh A supernatural bird which appears as a foreteller of death. Welsh
Aegisthus Greek A son of Thyestes, who unwittingly begot him by his own daughter Pelopia. Immediately after his birth he was exposed, by his mother, but was found and saved by shepherds and suckled by a goat.
Ahuic Aztec Ocean-Goddess, invoked by women giving birth. Aztec
Ajysyt Siberia / Yakut Goddess of healing and birth. she writes every new birth into a golden book. Siberia
Alkonost Greek The bird of paradise in Slavic mythology. It has the body of a bird with the face of a woman. The name Alkonost came from the name of Greek demi-goddess Alcyone transformed by gods into a kingfisher.
Alope Greek A daughter of Cercyon, who was beloved by Poseidon on account of her great beauty, and became by him the mother of a son, whom she exposed immediately after his birth.
Amaltheia Crete The nurse of the infant Zeus after his birth in Crete. The ancients themselves appear to have been as uncertain about the etymology of the name as about the real nature of Amaltheia. Hesychius derives it from the verb to nourish or to enrich, others from firm or hard; and others again from to signify the divine goat, or the tender goddess. The common derivation is from to milk or suck.
Anakadundubhi Hindu "Drums", the father of Lord Krishna, a name of Vasudeva called thus because the drums of heaven resounded at his birth. Hindu
Anapel Siberia / Koryak "Little Grandmother" Goddess who presides over birth and reincarnation Koryak
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Angeyja Norse One of Heimdal's nine mothers. The Elder Edda says in the Lay of Hyndla : Nine giant maids gave birth to the gracious god, at the world's margin. These are: Gjalp, Greip, Eistla, Angeyja, Ulfrun, Eyrgjafa, Imd, Atla, and Jarnsaxa. Norse.
Angus Gaelic A Gaelic god of amorous dalliance. A son of Dugda, his harp was so sweet that whoever heard must follow; his kisses became invisible love-whispering birds.
Ani-lbo Africa Goddess of Birth, Death, Happiness and Love Africa
Anqa Turkish A fabulous bird of enormous size which inhabits the Caucasus range. Turkish
Anukis Egypt Birth goddess and of the cataracts of the lower Nile. Egypt
Apollo Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks, was, according to Homer, the son of Zeus and Leto. Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod 918) states the same, and adds, that Apollo's sister was Artemis. Neither of the two poets suggests anything in regard to the birth-place of the god, unless we take "born in Lycia," which, however, according to others, would only mean "born of or in light." Apollo is one of the few Greek gods who did not sleep with Aphrodite
Ara Borneo Primeval creator god, in the form of a bird, who created the heavens , and with Irik, created mankind from clay. The Sea Dyaks of Sarawak, Borneo
Ares Greek The god of war and one of the great Olympian gods of the Greeks. He is represented as the son of Zeus and Hera. A later tradition, according to which Hera conceived Ares by touching a certain flower, appears to be an imitation of the legend about the birth of Hephaestus, and is related by Ovid.
Argus Greek A beast and son of Arestor with a hundred eyes of which he could only close two at a time. He was placed by Juno to guard Io, whom Jupiter had changed into a heifer. But Mercury, who was sent to carry her off, managed to surprise and kill Argus whereupon Juno transfered his eyes to the tail of a peacock, her favourite bird. In Greek mythology, Argus was the name of the builder of the Argo, the ship that carried the hero Jason in his quest for the Golden Fleece.
Arion Greek A fabulous horse, which Poseidon begot by Demeter; for in order to escape from the pursuit of Poseidon, the goddess had metamorphosed herself into a mare, and Poseidon deceived her by assuming the figure of a horse. Demeter afterwards gave birth to the horse Arion, and a daughter, Despoena.
Asase Ya Ghana The earth goddess of fertility in the mythology of the Ashanti people of Ghana. She is the wife of Nyame the sky god. In Ashanti mythology she gave birth to two sons, Bia and Tano. Ghana
Asbolus Greek A centaur, whom Hesiod ( Shield Of Heracles) calls a diviner, probably from his skill in observing or prophesying from the flight of birds. Greek
Atahensic Iroquois Goddess of the sky who fell to the earth at the beginning of creation. The Earth was created from her corpse after she died giving birth to the twins Hahgwehdiyu and Hahgwehdaetgah. Iroquois
Athena Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks. Homer calls her a daughter of Zeus, without any allusion to her mother or to the manner in which she was called into existence, while most of the later traditions agree in stating that she was born from the head of Zeus. According to the Theogony of Hesiod, Metis, the first wife of Zeus, was the mother of Athena, but when Metis was pregnant with her, Zeus, on the advice of Gaea and Uranus, swallowed Metis up, and afterwards gave birth himself to Athena, who sprang from his head.
Atthis Greek Or Attis, a daughter of Cranaus, from whom Attica, which was before called Actaea, was believed to have derived its name. The two birds into which Philomele and her sister Procne were metamorphosed, were likewise called Attis.
Auge Greek Princess of Arkadia and a priestess of Athena, who birthed her illegitimate son within the sacred precincts of the goddess. As punishment for the sacriligeous act, Athena made the land barren until the king had the girl exiled and sold into slavery. Greek
Ba Egypt Or Kneph, a ram-god, of the soul, and thus of birth. Egypt
Ba Egypt Banebdjed, a ram-god of birth, essentially the soul Osiris. Egypt
Ba Egyptian One part of the ancient Egyptian concept of the soul which was imagined as a bird body with a human head.
Ban Chuideachaidh Moire Ireland Old Goddess who appears in modern Irish legends as the midwife who assisted the Christian Virgin Mary with her birth, and was also a title applied to St. Bridget. A once forgotten goddess of childbirth. Ireland
Bangma or Bangmi India A fabulous bird in India, which can talk and give oracular advice.
Barbatos Greek A great count and duke, who appears when the sun is in Sagittarius with four noble kings and three companies of troops; he gives instructions in all the sciences, reveals treasures concealed by enchantment, knows the past and future, reconciles friends and those in power, and is of the Order of the Virtues. He also understands the songs of birds and the language of other animals. Unk
Benu Egypt God of the sun in a bird like form Egypt
Bidhata Purusha Hindu A god of fate and the Hindu equivalent of the Fates and the Norns. He writes the child’s future life on its forehead, on the sixth day after its birth.
Bir India A very malignant village demon. India
Birdu Babylon/Akkadia Minor underworld god. Babylon/Akkadia
Bmola Abenaki Bird spirit. Abenaki
Cacodaemons Greek Minor deities, one of whom it was believed was attached to each mortal from his birth as a constant companion and acting as a sort of messenger between the gods and men.
Camulatz Mayan A bird that ate the heads of the first men. Mayan
Candelifera Roman Goddess of childbirth and midwives who guides the child through the birth canal. Roman
Canens Greek A nymph, wife of Picus, King of the Laurentes. When Circe had changed Picus into a bird, Canens lamented him so greatly that she pined away. Greek
Chakora Hindu A fabulous bird, similar to a partridge that lives upon the beams of the moon. Hindu
Cliodna Ireland/Scotland Sea and Otherworld Goddess who usually took the form of a sea bird and therefore symbolized the Celtic afterlife. Ireland/Scotland
Clotho Greek One of the Three Fates. She presided over birth, and drew from her distaff the thread of life, Atropos presided over death and cut the thread of life, and Lachesis spun the fate of life between birth and death. Greek
Cock of Heaven Crow Mahomet found in the first heaven a cock of such enormous size that its crest touched the second heaven. The crowing of this celestial bird arouses every living creature from sleep except man. The Moslem doctors say that Allah lends a willing ear to him who reads the Koran, to him who prays for pardon, and to the cock whose chant is divine melody. When this cock ceases to crow, the day of judgment will be at hand.
Corpse Bird Whales "derwyn corph" the phantom of a bird that sits on a windowsill and taps on the glass when someone is about to die. Whales
Cunnembeille Australia Wife of Biame. She lives in the heavens with him and his other wife, Birrahgnooloo. Australia
Cymidei Cymeinfoll Welsh Cymidei Cymeinfoll (big belly of battle), was a goddess of the Mabinogi. Cymidei gave birth to one fully-formed and armed warrior every six weeks. Welsh
Dano Indian An Indian demon who is similar to the Bir.
Decima Roman Goddess of birth who watches over the pregnancy, one of the Parcae, the personifications of destiny. Roman
Deverra Roman One of the three symbolic beings, Pilumnus, Intercidona, and Deverra, whose influence was sought by the Romans at the birth of a child, as a protection for the mother against the vexations of Sylvanus. Roman
E Alom Mayan Primeval creator goddessess, literally, those who conceive and give birth Mayan
Eileithyia Greek Also called Eleithyia, Eilethyia, or Eleutho. The ancients derive her name from the coming or helping goddess. She was the goddess of birth, who came to the assistance of women in labour; and when she was kindly disposed, she furthered the birth, but when she was angry, she protracted the labour and delayed the birth. Greek
Eingana Australian The world-creator, the birth mother, maker of all water, land, animals, and kangaroos. This huge snake goddess still lives in the Dreamtime. Australian
Elara Greek A daughter of Orchomenus or Minyas, who became by Zeus the mother of the giant Tityus and Zeus, from fear of Hera, concealed her under the earth. (Apollodorus i. Argonautica) This was where she gave birth to Tityas, who some traditions state to be the son of Elara and Gaia, the earth goddess. Greek
Empung Lumimuut Sulawesi Goddess who gave birth to God of the sun. Sulawesi
Empung Luminuut N Celebes Is/ Sulawesi A goddess that gave birth to the sun god
Eurybates aka Eribotes Greek The son of Teleon, was one of the Argonauts, and appears to have acted as surgeon, as he is represented as attending on Oileus when he was wounded by one of the Stymphalian birds.. (Argonautica). Greek
Evadne Greek 1. A daughter of Poseidon and Pitane. Immediately after her birth, she was carried to the Arcadian king Aepytus, who brought her up. She afterwards became by Apollo the mother of Iamus. 2. A daughter of Iphis, or Philax. (Apollodorus iii) There are three other mythical personages of the same name. Greek
Fates Greek Properly signifies "a share," and as a personification "the deity who assigns to every man his fate or his share," or the Fates. Homer usually speaks of only one Moira, and only once mentions the Motpai in the plural. In his poems Moira is fate personified, which, at the birth of man, spins out the thread of his future life, follows his steps, and directs the consequences of his actions according to the counsel of the gods. Homer thus, when he personifies Fate, conceives her as spinning, an act by which also the power of other gods over the life of man is expressed. Greek
Giltine Lithuania The goddess of death whose sacral bird is the owl. Giltine proclaims disaster. She goes with the goddesses of black death. Lithuania
Gorge Greek A daughter of Oeneus and Althaea, and the wife of Andraemon. When Artemis metamorphosed her sisters into birds, on account of their unceasing lamentations about their brother Meleager, Gorge and Deianeira alone were spared. Greek
Graeae Greek That is, " the old women," were daughters of Phorcys and Ceto. They had grey hair from their birth. Hesiod mentions only two Graeae, viz. Pephredo and Enyo; Apollodorus adds Deino as a third, and Aeschylus also speaks of three Graeae. Greek
Hameh Arabian In mythology, a bird formed from the blood near the brains of a murdered man. This bird cries "Iskoonee!" (Give me drink!), meaning drink of the murderer's blood; and this it cries incessantly till the death is avenged, when it flies away. Arabian
Hanuman Hindu A celestial being, named Punjikasthala, who, due to a curse, was born on the earth as a female vanara. The curse was to be removed on her giving birth to an incarnation of Lord Shiva. Hindu
Harpyia Greek That is, "the swift robbers," are, in the Homeric poems, nothing but personified storm winds. Homer mentions only one by name, viz. Podarge, who was married to Zephyrus, and gave birth to the two horses of Achilles, Xanthus and Balius. Greek
Haumea Hawaii A goddess of fertility and childbirth. With Kane Milohai, she is the mother of Pele, Ka-moho-ali'i, Namaka, Pere, Kapo and Hi'iaka. She was a powerful sorceress and gave birth to many creatures; some after turning herself into a young woman to marry her children and grandchildren. She was finally killed by Kaulu. Hawaii
Hephaestus Greek The god of fire, was, according to the Homeric account, the son of Zeus and Hera The Romans, when speaking of the Greek Hephaestus, call him Vulcan or Vulcanus, although Vulcanus was an original Italian divinity. Later traditions state that he had no father, and that Hera gave birth to him independent of Zeus, as she was jealous of Zeus having given birth to Athena independent of her. Greek
Hermes Greek A son of Zeus and Maia, the daughter of Atlas, was born in a cave of Mount Cyllene or in Olympus. In the first hours after his birth, he escaped from his cradle, went to Pieiria, and carried off some of the oxen of Apollo. The herald and messenger of the gods, of his travelling from place to place and the concluder of treaties and the promoter of social intercourse and of commerce among men. Regarded as the maintainer of peace, and as the god of roads, who protected travellers, and punished those who refused to assist travellers who had mistaken their way. Greek
Hesat Egypt Goddess of birth and a minor guardian of pregnant and nursing mothers. Egypt
Hi-No-Kagu-Tsuchi Japan Fire god whose birth caused the death of the primordial goddess Izanami Japan/Shinto
Hinokagutsuchi Japan Fire god whose birth killed the goddess Izanami Japan/Shinto
Historis Greek A daughter of Teiresias, and engaged in the service of Alcmene. By her cry that Alcmene had already given birth, she induced the Pharmacides to withdraw, and thus enabled her mistress to give birth to Heracles. Greek
Horus Egyptian The Egyptian day-god, represented in hieroglyphics by a sparrow-hawk, which bird was sacred to him. He was son of Osiris and Isis, but his birth being premature he was weak in the lower limbs. As a child he is seen carried in his mother's arms, wearing the pschent or atf, and seated on a lotus-flower with his finger on his lips. As an adult he is represented hawk-headed. Strictly speaking, Horus is the rising sun, Ra the noonday sun, and Osiris the setting sun.
Huiracocha/ Viracocho Inca The supreme deity accused of a virgin birth & creator of of the world
Hulluk Miyumko Miwok The California Miwok name for the Pleiades. The Hulluk Miyumko were female deities who gave birth to "beautiful star chiefs".
Huma China A fabulous Oriental bird which never alights, but is always on the wing. It is said that every head which it overshadows will wear a crown.
Huruing Wuhti Hopi In the Hopi Indian creation story, they were a pair of women who survived the Great Flood. The Huruing Wuhti were later venerated as mother goddesses, because they gave birth to the Hopi people.
Hylech Astrology That planet, or point of the sky, which dominates at man's birth, and influences his whole life. Astrology
Intercidona Roman One of the Deverra, three symbolic beings whose influence was sought by the Romans, at the birth of a child, as a protection for the mother against the vexations of Sylvanus. Roman
Irik Borneo A primeval creator spirit, in the form of a bird, who created the earth; with Ara, created mankind from clay. The Sea Dyaks of Sarawak, Borneo
Izanami-No-Kami/ Izamnami Japan/ Shinto A creator goddess who died and giving birth to the fire god as well as the primeval female goddess
Jok Uganda God of the Alur tribesmen of Uganda and Zaire. He is also known as Jok Odudu the god of birth. Uganda
Jongsuli-Young-Jongbu India "At first there was neither earth nor sky, Shuzanghu and his wife Zumiang-Nui lived alone...In due time Zumiang-Nui gave birth to a baby-girl, Subbu-Khai-Thung, who is the Earth and to a baby-boy, Jongsuli-Young-Jongbu, who is the Sky." India
Kabunian Philippines Descended from his home in the sky. On earth he married a virtuous maiden named Bangan. She bore him three children. The first was Kabigat, a boy, second was Daungen, a girl. After the birth of the third child, Kabunian had to return to his home in heaven. As a god, he could not continue living indefinitely on earth. Philippines
Kallingenia Greek Rather obscure goddess of birth found only in the ritual texts of Athens Greek
Kaltes Siberia Goddess of birth Siberia/Vogul
Kaltesh Ugric Siberia Goddess concerned with the birth and destiny of the child Siberia(west)
Kana-Yama-Hime-No-Kami Japan Goddess of miners with a very sad birth story Japan/Shinto
Kinnara India Group of spirit beings who it looked like birds with a human heads India
Krodha India The mother "of all sharp-toothed monsters, whether on the earth, amongst the birds, or in the waters, that were devourers of flesh." India
Kun China A mythological bird. China
Kunmanngur Australia Is a serpent from an Aboriginal tale, "The Flood and the Bird Men", told by Kianoo Tjeemairee of the Murinbata tribe. There are many names for the Rainbow Serpent in Aboriginal mythology, depending on location and language. It is a powerful symbol of fertility and creation. Australia
Le Tkakawash Klamath Goddess of birds Klamath
Lucina Roman The goddess of light, or rather the goddess that brings to light, and hence the goddess that presides over the birth of children; it was therefore used as a surname of Juno and Diana. Roman
Mabon ap Modron Celtic "divine son", the son of Modron "divine mother"). Synonymous with the Ancient British god, Maponos. He was a hunter god who was stolen from his mother three days after his birth. He then lived in Annwn until he was rescued by Culhwch. Because of his time in Annwn, Mabon stayed a young adult forever. Celtic
Makonaima British Makunaima. The supreme god and creator who sent his son Sigu to rule over the earth. Among the Makushi he created the sky and earth, vegetation, animals and men. Among the Ackawoi and Caribs, he created birds, animals, and food plants, assisted by his son Sigu. British Guiana
Mesenet Egypt Goddess of the birth tile Egypt
Meskhoni Egypt Goddess birth and midwives Egypt
Mog Ruith Ireland A powerful blind druid of Munster who lived on Valentia Island, County Kerry. He could grow to enormous size, and his breath caused storms and turned men to stone. He wore a hornless bull-hide and a bird mask, and flew in a machine called the roth ramach, the "oared wheel". He had an ox-driven chariot in which night was as bright as day, a star-speckled black shield with a silver rim, and a stone which could turn into a poisonous eel when thrown in water. Ireland
Moirai Greek Properly signifies "a share," and as a personification "the deity who assigns to every man his fate or his share," or the Fates. Homer usually speaks of only one Moira, and only once mentions the Motpai in the plural. In his poems Moira is fate personified, which, at the birth of man, spins out the thread of his future life, follows his steps, and directs the consequences of his actions according to the counsel of the gods. Homer thus, when he personifies Fate, conceives her as spinning, an act by which also the power of other gods over the life of man is expressed. Greek
Morongo Zimbabwe Goddess of the evening star, gave birth to the animals of creation and then went on to create humans. Zimbabwe
Mundane Egg Egyptian In the Phoenician, Egyptian, Hindu, and Japanese systems, it is represented that the world was hatched from an egg. In some mythologies a bird is represented as laying the mundane egg on the primordial waters.
Nahual Aztec From the Nahuatl word nahualli which was used to refer to practicioners of harmful magic. In the aztec belief system the day of a persons birth caluclated in the Tonalpohualli would determine the nature of the person - each day was associated with an animal which could have a strong or weak aspect.
Nammu Sumeria Goddess of the primeval sea that gave birth to An (heaven) and Ki (earth) and the first gods. Sumeria
Nascio Roman A Roman divinity, presiding over the birth of children, and accordingly a goddess assisting Lucina in her functions, and analogous to the Greek Eileithyia. Roman
Nemglan Ireland Bird god who fathered Conaire Mor Ireland
Nilalohita Hindu Sent by Shiva to take birth on Earth to drive away the insanity of the people under the preachings of the Mayavadis and to propagate Srouta Sivaradhya Sampradayam. Hindu
Niu Taiwanese Goddess who Presides over the Birth of Mortals. Taiwanese
Nixi Dii Roman A general term, which seems to have been applied by the Romans to those divinities who were believed to assist women at the time when they were giving birth to a child. Before the cella of Minerva, on the Capitol, there were three statues, which were designated as Dii Nixi. Roman
Nokomis Hiawatha Daughter of the Moon. Sporting one day with her maidens on a swing made of vine canes, a rival cut the swing, and Nokomis fell to earth, where she gave birth to a daughter named Wenonah. Hiawatha
Nona Roman Minor goddess of birth Roman
Norn plural Nornir Norse The weird sisters; the three heavenly norns Urd, Verdande, and Skuld (Past, Present, and Future); they dwelt at the fountain of Urd, and ruled the fate of the world. Three norns were also present at the birth of very man and cast the horoscope of his life. Norse
Nyambi Africa In the beginning Nyambi made all things. He made animals, birds. At that time he lived on earth with his wife, Nasilele. Africa
Nyasi Kenya The supreme being and creator god who controls birth and death. Kenya
Ocrisia Roman Who, after being visited by Vulcan, birth to a boy who would become the sixth King of Rome, Servius Tullius. Roman
Old Man Blackfoot Came from the south, making the mountains, the prairies, and the forests as he passed, the birds and the animals too. He traveled north making things as he went and arranging the world as we see it today. Blackfoot
Omumborombonga Namibia The Primordial Tree which gave birth to Mukura, the first man, and his wife. Namibia
Osseo Hiawatha Son of the Evening Star. When "old and ugly, broken with age, and weak with coughing," he married Oweenee, youngest of the ten daughters of a North hunter. She loved him in spite of his ugliness and decrepitude, because "all was beautiful within him." One day, as he was walking with his nine sisters-in-law and their husbands, he leaped into the hollow of an oak-tree, and came out "tall and straight and strong and handsome;" but Oweenee at the same moment was changed into a weak old woman, "wasted, wrinkled, old, and ugly;" but the love of Osse'o was not weakened. The nine brothers and sisters-in-law were all transformed into birds for mocking Osseo and Oweenee when they were ugly, and Oweenee, recovering her beauty, had a son, whose delight as he grew up was to shoot at his aunts and uncles, the birds that mocked his father and mother. Hiawatha
Otontecuhtli aka Xiuhtecuhtli Aztec Goddess of the earth, flowers, plants, games and dance, love. She is also the patroness of artisans, prostitutes, pregnant women and birth. Aztec
Parce Greek/ Roman A pair birth goddesses became the goddesses of fate
Paris Greek Also called Alexander, was the second son of Priam and Hecabe. Previous to his birth Hecabe dreamed that she had given birth to a firebrand, the flames of which spread over the whole city. This dream was interpreted to her by Aesacus, or according to others by Cassandra, by Apollo, or by a Sibyl, and was said to indicate that Hecabe should give birth to a son, who should bring about the ruin of his native city, and she was accordingly advised to expose the child. Greek
Pegasus Greek The famous winged horse, whose origin is thus related. When Perseus struck off the head of Medusa, with whom Poseidon had had intercourse in the form of a horse or a bird, there sprang forth from her Chrysaor and the horse Pegasus. The latter obtained the name Pegasus because he was believed to have made his appearance near the sources of Oceanus. Greek
Perseus Greek The famous Argive hero, was a son of Zeus and Danae, and a grandson of Acrisius. Acrisius, who had no male issue, consulted the Pythian oracle, and received the answer, that if Danae should give birth to a son, he would kill his father. Greek
Pi Hsia Yuan Chin China Goddess of birth and midwives who brings health and good fortune to the newborn baby. China
Pilumnus Roman A nature deity, brother of Picumnus. He ensured children grew properly and stayed healthy. Ancient Romans made an extra bed after the birth of a child in order to ensure the help of Pilumnus. He also taught humanity how to grind grain and sometimes identified as the husband of Danae, and therefore the father of Danaus and the ancestor of Turnus. Roman
Priapus Greek Priapos, a son of Dionysus and Aphrodite. Aphrodite, it is said, had yielded to the embraces of Dionysus, but during his expedition to India, she became faithless to him, and lived with Adonis. On Dionysus return from India, she indeed went to meet him, but soon left him again, and went to Lampsacus on the Hellespont, to give birth to the child of the god. Greek
Purva shadha Hindu The influence of Purvashadha as a birth star makes one able to be independently wealthy, firm in friendship and devotion, reflect on the Divine, but to a young soul, pride and conceit. Hindu Zodiac
Qa Gigo Goddess of the Omnibombly bird. Gigo
Rhiannon Ireland Chthonic goddess of birds and horses. Ireland
Rhoeo Greek 1. A daughter of Staphylus and Chrysothemis, was beloved by Apollo. When her father discovered that she was with child, he put her in a chest, and exposed her to the waves of the sea. The chest floated to the coast of Euboea (or Delos), where Rhoeo gave birth to Anius. Subsequently she was married to Zarex
Seemurgh Persian The wonderful bird that could speak all the languages of the world, and whose knowledge embraced past, present, and future events. Persian
Shing-moo China A nature goddess. She was the mother of perfect intelligence, and gave birth to a saviour son through an immaculate conception. China
Simorgh Persian Gigantic bird like the hippogriff or griffin; half phoenix, half lion. Persian
Sirin Russian A mythological creature with the head and chest of a beautiful woman and the body of a bird. According to the myth, they lived near Eden or around the Euphrates River. Russian
Sobek Egypt Crocodile god. In the Book of the Dead, he assists in the birth of Horus and helps to destroy Seth. Egypt
Stymphalides Greek The celebrated rapacious birds near the Stymphalian lake in Arcadia, whence they were driven by Heracles and compelled to take refuge in the island of Aretias in the Euxine, where they were afterwards found by the Argonauts. Greek
Suoyatar Finnish One of the forces of evil in the Kalevala, who gives birth to the serpent of evil or death by means of her spittle. Finnish
Svyatogor Slavic A hero who fought the demon Nightingale, a bird-headed human whose weapons were hurricanes. Slavic
Tane aka Tane Mahuta Maori the god of forests and of birds. Maori
Tango Hervey is A god of virgin birth, kinda
Tarchetius Roman A. mythical king of Alba, who in some traditions is connected with the founders of Rome. Once a phallus was seen rising above one of his flocks. In compliance with an oracle he ordered one of his daughters to approach the phallus; but she sent one of her maid servants, who became pregnant, and gave birth to the twins Romulus and Remus. Roman
Tezcacoac Aztec She is a birth goddess
Touia Fatuna Tonga/ Polynesia The earth goddess, the deification of the rock deep in the earth that rumbles & gives birth to new land
Touia Fatuna Tonga Polynesia Goddess of the earth, the deification of the rock deep in the earth who rumbles and gives birth to new land Polynesia
Trgiaob Nazorean As an angel who protects wild birds from extinction, pollution and destruction of their habitat. Early Nazorean
Tu-Metua Hervey Is God of silence who had an immaculate birth Hervey Is.
Uairebhuidhe Ireland Bird goddess and possibly a goddess of death. Ireland
Umaj Yakut Goddess of midwives, fertility, and birth. Yakut
Vagitanus Roman this minor god of passage was the guardian of the press first cry at birth
Veja Mate Latvia Goddess of the wind was also responsible for birds and the woodlands. Latvia
White Merle Basques Of the old Basques. A white fairy bird, which, by its singing, restored sight to the blind.
Winifred s Patron saint of virgins, because she was beheaded by Prince Caradoc for refusing to marry him. She was Welsh by birth, and the legend says that her head falling on the ground originated the famous healing well of St. Winifred in Flintshire. She is usually drawn like St. Denis, carrying her head in her hand. Holywell, in Wales, is St. Winifred's Well, celebrated for its "miraculous" virtues.
Wokey Britain Wicked as the Witch of Wokey. Wookey-hole is a noted cavern in Somersetshire, which has given birth to as many weird stories as the Sibyls' Cave in Italy. The Witch of Wokey was metamorphosed into stone by a "lerned wight" from Gaston, but left her curse behind, so that the fair damsels of Wokey rarely find "a gallant." Britain
Xolas Tierra del Fuego The supreme deity. At birth he is said to place the soul into every body, receiving it back after death to await rebirth. Tierra del Fuego
Yaxcocahmut Aztecs A bird god of the Aztecs
Yoni Sanskrit The Sanskrit word for "Divine Passage". The Ayurveda, or Science of Life, described yoni as a part of the female anatomy. Here the term was meant as a designation of respect for women who gave birth, thus contributing to the continuation of the community.
Zal Persian Son of Sam Neriman, exposed on Mount Elburz, because he was born with white hair, and therefore supposed to be the offspring of a deer. He was brought up by the wonderful bird Seemurgh, and when claimed by his father, received from the foster-bird a feather to give him insight into futurity. Persian
Zarpandit Assyria/Babylon Aka Zerbanit, Zerbanitu, Zerpanitum, and Beltis. Goddess of pregnancy and birth, consort of Marduk. Assyria/Babylon
Zarpanitu Babylonian A birth goddess and a consort of Marduk. Babylonian
Zu Akkadian A lesser divinity of Akkadian mythology, and the son of the bird goddess Siris. Both Zu and Siris are seen as massive birds who can breathe fire and water, although Zu is alternately seen as a lion-headed eagle