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List of Gods : "Cap"
NameOriginDescription
Acrasia Britain Self-indulgence. An enchantress who lived in the "Bower of Bliss," situate in "Wandering Island" She transformed her lovers into monstrous shapes, and kept them captives. Sir Guyon having crept up softly, threw a net over her, and bound her in chains of adamant; then broke down her bower and burnt it to ashes. Britain.
Adamastor Greek The spirit of the stormy Cape (Good Hope), described by Camoens in the Lusiad as a hideous phantom. According to Barreto, he was one of the giants who invaded heaven.
Aega Greek A daughter of Olenus, who was a descendant of Hephaestus. Aega and her sister Helice nursed the infant Zeus in Crete, and the former was afterwards changed by the god into the constellation called Capella. Greek
Agischanak Tlingit The kindly goddess of the Tlingit people of Alaska. A powerful goddess capable of supporting the pillar on which the earth rests.
Anchises Greek A son of Capys and Themis, the daughter of Ilus. His descent is traced by Aeneas, his son, from Zeus himself. (Apollodorus iii) Hyginus makes him a son of Assaracus and grandson of Capys.
Anhur Egypt Aka Anher, Anhert. Official God of the nome Abt and its capital. Rules over War, Sun and the sky. Egypt.
Assaracus Greek A son of Tros and Calirrhoe, the daughter of Scamander. He was king of Troy, and husband of Hieromneme, by whom he became the father of Capys, the father of Anchises.
Baalzephon Canaanite Captain of guard and sentinels of Hell. Canaanite
Balisarda or Balisardo Spain Rogero's sword, made by a sorceress, and capable of cutting through enchanted substances.
Caligorant Egyptian An Egyptian giant and cannibal who used to entrap strangers with a hidden net. This net was made by Vulcan to catch Mars and Venus, Mercury stole it for the purpose of catching Chloris, and left it in the temple of Anubis; Caligorant stole it thence. At length Astolpho blew his magic horn, and the giant ran affrighted into his own net, which dragged him to the ground. Whereupon Astolpho made the giant his captive, and despoiled him of his net.
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Capakan Maya The god of earthquakes & mountains
Capricorn Roman "the centaur archer." Capricornus is the tenth, or, strictly speaking, the eleventh sign of the zodiac. (Dec. 21-Jan. 20.) According to classic mythology, Capricorn was Pan, who, from fear of the great Typhon, changed himself into a goat, and was made by Jupiter one of the signs of the zodiac. Roman
Dragons Guardin Ladies European The walls of feudal castles ran winding round the building, and the ladies were kept in the securest part. As adventurers had to scale the walls to gain access to the ladies, the authors of romance said they overcame the serpent-like defence, or the dragon that guarded them. Sometimes there were two walls, and then the bold invader overcame two dragons in his attempt to liberate the captive damsel. European
Erymanthean Greek A devastating boar which wandered about in Arcadia. Its capture was one of the labours of Hercules. Greek
Gad Babylonian The pan-Semitic deity of fortune worshipped during the babylonian captivity.
Galligantus Greek A giant who lived with Hocus-Pocus in an enchanted castle. By his magic he changed men and women into dumb animals, amongst which was a duke's daughter, changed into a roe. Jack the Giant Killer, arrayed in his cap, which rendered him invisible, went to the castle and read the inscription: "Whoever can this trumpet blow, will cause the giant's overthrow." He seized the trumpet, blew a loud blast, the castle fell down, Jack slew the giant, and was married soon after to the duke's daughter. Fairy tale
Glasya-Labolas Christian A mighty President of Hell who commands thirty-six legions of demons. He teaches all arts and sciences just in an instant. He is the author and captain of manslaughter and bloodshed, tells all things past and to come, gains the minds and love of friends and foes causing love among them if desired, incites homicides and can make a man invisible. Christian demonology
Heitsi-Eibib Namaqua A flood hero deity who "came from the east," landing in the west of Cape South Africa, a very long time ago, with fellow survivors from a sunken kingdom. Namaqua
Helenos Greek The prophet, the only son of Priam that survived the fall of Troy. He fell to the share of Pyrrhos when the captives were awarded; and because he saved the life of the young Grecian was allowed to marry Andromache, his brother Hector's widow. (Virgil: ?neid.)
Helios Greek In Greece the cult of Helios was very ancient and was practised throughout the land, at Elis, at Apollonia, on the Acropolis of Corinth, at Argos, at Troezen, on Cape Taenarum, at Athens, in Thrace and finally, and especially, in the island of Rhodes which was sacred to him. In Rhodes could be seen.the colossal statue of HeIios, the renowned work of the sculptor Chares. It was about thirty yards high, and ships in full sail could pass between the god's legs. Greek
Horae Greek Horai, originally the personifications or goddesses of the order of nature and of the seasons, but in later times they were regarded as the goddesses of order in general and of justice. In Homer, who neither mentions their parents nor their number, they are the Olympian divinities of the weather and the ministers of Zeus; and in this capacity they guard the doors of Olympus, and promote the fertility of the earth, by the various kinds of weather they send down. Greek
Huitzilopochtli Aztec The divine leader who rescued an ancestral people from his devastated island kingdom in the Atlantic Ocean, Aztlan. Arriving in the Valley of Mexico, they built a new capital to commemorate their lost city, when Tenochtitlan was constructed on a rocky island at the center of a man-made lake. Aztec
Inkanyamba Africa A legendary serpent living in a waterfall lake area in the northern forests near Cape Town, South Africa
Jarina Brazil Tree goddess, well known for her capacity for drink. Bakairi, Brazil
Jormungand Norse The serpent, Jormungand was the middle child of Loki and the giantess, Angrboda. He had 2 siblings, Hel, and the wolf, Fenrir. Alarmed that Loki had fathered these children, Odin sent a group of gods to kidnap them. Once captured, Odin threw Jormungand into the ocean surrounding Midgard, where he lived from then on. The serpent grew so much that he encircled the whole world and bit his own tail. Norse
Lacedaemon Sparta A son of Zeus by Taygete, was married to Sparta, the daughter of Eurotas, by whom he became the father of Amyclas, Eurydice, and Asine. He was king of the country which he called after his own name, Lacedaemon, while he gave to his capital the name of his wife, Sparta.
Liris Hebrew A proud but lovely daughter of the race of man, beloved by Rubi, first of the angel host. Her passion was the love of knowledge, and she was captivated by all her lover told her of heaven and the works of God. At last she requested Rubi to appear before her in all his glory, and as she fell into his embrace was burnt to ashes by the rays which issued from him. Hebrew
Loki Norse Loki. To end, finish; Loke is the end and consummation of divinity. The evil giant-god of the Norse mythology. He steers the ship Naglfar in Ragnarok. He borrows Freyja's feather-garb and accompanies Thor to the giant Thrym, who has stolen Thor's hammer. He is the father of Sleipner; also of the Midgard serpent, of the Fenris-wolf and of Hel. He causes Balder's death, abuses the gods in ?ger's feast, but is captured in Fraanangerforce and is bound by the gods. Norse
Ma Cappadocia/ Anatolia/ Turkey A fertility & vegetation goddess
Manco Capac Inca God of war and the sun Inca/Quechua
Mens Roman I. e. mind, a personification of mind, worshipped by the Romans. She had a sanctuary on the Capitol. The object of her worship was that the citizens might always be guided by a right and just spirit. Roman
Midas-eared Greek Without discrimination or judgment. Midas, King of Phrygia, was appointed to judge a musical contest between Apollo and Pan, and gave judgment in favour of the satyr; whereupon Apollo in contempt gave the king a pair of ass's ears. Midas hid them under his Phrygian cap; out his servant, who used to cut his hair, discovered them, and was so tickled at the "joke," which he durst not mention, that he dug a hole in the earth, and relieved his mind by whispering in it "Midas has ass's ears." Greek
Mithras Roman About the time of the Roman emperors his worship was introduced at Rome, and thence spread over all parts of the wearing the Phrygian cap and attire, and kneeling on a bull which is thrown on the ground, and whose throat he is cutting. The bull is at the same time attacked by a dog, a serpent, and a scorpion. This group appears frequently among ancient works of art. Roman
Murcury Greek The name Mercury is connected with the root merx (merchandise) and mercari (to deal, trade). The early Romans, being above all countrymen, had no need for a god of commerce. The Roman Mercury appeared only about the fifth century BCE. and was exclusively the god of merchants. For long he was known only in this capacity so that Plautus, in his prologue to Amphitryon, reminds his audience that Mercury presided over messages and commerce. Like certain other minor divinities - Pecunia, Aesculanus, Argentinus - he watched over tradesmen's profits. Greek
Nagini Harry Potter A snake and the pet of Lord Voldemort, a Parseltongue, who is capable of communicating with her.
Nix German Kind busy-body. Little creatures not unlike the Scotish brownie and German kobold. They wear a red cap, and are ever ready to lend a helping hand to the industrious and thrifty. "Another tribe of water-fairies are the Nixes, who frequently assume the appearance of beautiful maidens."- T. F. T. Dyer: Folk-lore of Plants
Nixi Dii Roman A general term, which seems to have been applied by the Romans to those divinities who were believed to assist women at the time when they were giving birth to a child. Before the cella of Minerva, on the Capitol, there were three statues, which were designated as Dii Nixi. Roman
Nosenga Zimbabwe The sun, the primal source of light, has to be captured so that people may have light to live by. The secret of the sun is that its light penetrates even in the darkest room, just as a swallow can fly through a house before anyone can catch it. Nosenga caught the sunbirds in his trap, and so day broke. Zimbabwe
Oebalus Greek 1. A son of Cynortes, and husband of Gorgophone, by whom he became the father of Tyndareus, Peirene, and Arene, was king of Sparta. According to others he was a son of Perieres and a grandson of Cynortas, and was married to the nymph Bateia, by whom he had several children (Apollodorus iii). The patronymic Oebalides is not only applied to his descendants, but to the Spartans generally, and hence it occurs as an epithet or surname of Hyacinthus, Castor, Pollux and Helena. 2. A son of Telon by a nymph of the stream Sebethus, near Naples. Telon, originally a king of the Teleboans, had come from the island of Taphos to Capreae, in Italy and Oebalus settled in Campania. (The Aeneid Book VII) Greek
Oto Hime Japan Hereupon the Heavenly Sovereign, to assure himself of what he had heard of the beauty of the two maidens Ye-hime and Oto-hime, daughters of King Kamu-ohone, ancestor of the Rulers of the Land of Minu, sent his august child, His Augustness Oho-usu, to summon them up to the Capital. So His Augustness Oho-usu who had been sent, instead of summoning them up, forthwith wedded both the maidens himself, and then sought other women, to whom he falsely gave the maidens' names, and sent them up. Hereupon the Heavenly Sovereign, knowing them to be other women, frequently subjected them to his long glances; but, never wedding them, caused them to sorrow. So the child that His Augustness Oho-usu begot on wedding Ye-hime, was King Oshi-kuro-no-ye-hiko (he was the ancestor of the Lords of Unesu in Minu.) Again, the child that he begot on wedding Oto-hime, was King Oshi-kuro-no-oto-hiko, the ancestor of the Dukes of Mugetsu. The Kojiki, Japan
Panic Greek On one occasion Bacchus, in his Indian expeditions, was encompassed with an army far superior to his own; one of his chief captains, named Pan, advised him to command all his men at the dead of night to raise a simultaneous shout. The shout was rolled from mountain to mountain by innumerable echoes, and the Indians, thinking they were surrounded on all sides, took to sudden flight. Greek
Procne Greek Procne or Prokne was a daughter of Pandion and Zeuxippe. She married Tereus and had one son: Itys. Tereus loved his wife's sister, Philomela. He raped her, cut her tongue out and held her captive so she could never tell anyone. Philomela wove a tapestry that told her story and gave it to Procne. In revenge, Procne killed her son by Tereus, Itys, and fed him to Tereus unknowingly. Greek
Thebes Greek An ancient city of Egypt of great renown, once capital of Upper Egypt; covered 10 sq. m. of the valley of the Nile on both sides of the river, 300 m. SE. of Cairo; now represented by imposing ruins of temples, palaces, tombs, and statues of colossal size, amid which the humble dwellings of four villages-Luxor, Karnack, Medinet Habu, and Kurna-have been raised. The period of its greatest flourishing extended from about 1600 to 1100 B.C., but some of its ruins have been dated as far back as 2500 B.C. Greek
Thessaly Greek Is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. The capital of the periphery is Larissa. The prefecture lies in central Greece and borders Macedonia on the north, Epirus on the west, Sterea Hellas or Central Greece on the south and the Aegean Sea on the east. Greek
Thrummy Cap Britain A sprite described in Northumberland fairy tales as a "queer-looking little auld man," whose exploits are generally laid in the cellans of old castles. Britain
Tiberinus Greek One of the mythical kings of Alba, son of Capetus, and father of Agrippa, is said to have been drowned in crossing the river Alba, which was hence called Tiberis after him, and of which he became the guardian god. Greek
Una Christian Truth, so called because truth is one. She starts with St. George on his adventure, and being driven by a storm into "Wandering Wood," retires for the night to Hypocrisy's cell. St. George quits the cell, leaving Una behind. In her search for him she is caressed by a lion, who afterwards attends her. She next sleeps in the hut of Superstition, and next morning meets Hypocrisy dressed as St. George. As they journey together Sansloy meets them, exposes Hypocrisy, kills the lion, and carries off Una on his steed to a wild forest. Una fills the air with her shrieks, and is rescued by the fauns and satyrs, who attempt to worship her, but, being restrained, pay adoration to her ass. She is delivered from the satyrs and fauns by Sir Satyrane, and is told by Archimago that St. George is dead, but subsequently hears that he is the captive of Orgoglio. She goes to King Arthur for aid, and the king both slays Orgoglio and rescues the knight. Una, now takes St. George to the house of Holiness, where he is carefully nursed, and then leads him to Eden, where their union is consummated. Spenser: Faerie Queene
Victoria Roman the goddess of victory that became an attack by the Christians with an angelic capacity
Zara-ma-yha-who Aboriginal A little red man, about 4 feet tall, with a large head and mouth. The tips of the fingers and toes were shaped like the suckers of an octopus. They lived in wild fig trees and capture their prey by dropping on passers-by. A Zara-ma-yha-who might jump on top of the person and drain their blood with their hands and feet. Their victims rarely died from the initial encounter, but because the person was left in a weak and helpless state, the yara-ma-yha-who would return later and swallow the victim. It then drank water and took a nap. When it awoke, it would regurgitate the undigested portion of its meal, which, if the meal was a person, that person would still be alive. Aboriginal