8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Deities Apa" - 59 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
Deities name
"Shichifukujin"
Japan A deity of happiness, prosperity, longevity, and wisdom. One of the seven principal deities of luck, identified as Ebisu, Daikokuten, Bishamonten, Benzaiten, Fukurokuju, Jurojin, and Hotei. Japan
Deities name
"Dhruva (immovable)"
Hindu / Epic / Puranic Astral god. The son of Uttanapada, a star in the constellation of Ursa Minor which was the pole star in the last millennium BC. An avatara of V IS NU. Also one of a group of Vasu deities answering to the god INDRA. In different context, the description of a kind of fixed icon. Attributes: prayer wheel, rosary, spear and water jar....
Deities name
"Apa"
Hindu / Puranic Attendant god. One of a group of eight VASU deities answering to the god INDRA. Attributes: hook and plough....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Demon name
"Zouchou Ten"
Japan Attended by demons, is one of the sixteen heavenly deities protecting Hannya. Japan
Goddess name
"AVALOKITESVARA (merciful lord)"
Buddhist / India Bodhisattva or buddhadesignate. One of the most important deities of the Mahayana sect of Buddhism. In Lamaism he is the tutelary god of Tibet. He equates with VIS NU in Hinduism and bears links with PADMAPANI. In cosmic mythology he is a creator deity. Color: white or red. Attributes: blue lotus, image of Amitabha (topmost pyramidal head), lotus, rosary, sword and water jar. NOTE: in Chinese Buddhism he is represented by the goddess Kuan-Tin, and in Japanese by KWANNON....
Goddess name
"Papatuanuku"
Polynesian / including Maori Chthonic mother goddess. According to tradition she evolved spontaneously in the cosmic night personified by TE PO and became the apotheosis of papa, the earth. In other traditions she was engendered, with the sky god RANGINUI, by a primordial androgynous being, ATEA. Paptuanuku and Ranginui are regarded as the primal parents of the pantheon who, through a prolonged period of intercourse, produced at least ten major deities as their children. In Maori culture Papatuanuku, like all deities, is represented only by inconspicuous, slightly worked stones or pieces of wood and not by the large totems, which are depictions of ancestors....
Deities name
"Dharmapala"
Buddhist / particularly Lamaist / Tibet Collective name for a group of eight tutelary deities. They wear royal apparel but are of terrible appearance and are considered to be the guardians of the law. General attributes: ax, cup, knife and snake....
Goddess name
"Suijin"
Shinto / Japan Collective name for water gods. These deities are worshiped at shrines at the sources of irrigation canals, lakes and ponds. They are depicted as snakes, eels and fish and invoked particularly by women. Chief among them is the goddess MIZU-HA-NO-ME....
Deities name
"Umashi-Ashi-Kabi-Hiko-Ji-No-Kami (pleasant reed shoot prince elder deity)"
Shinto / Japan Creator being. The fourth of the deities to be listed in the Kojiki sacred text. He was engendered from the reeds floating on the pri mordial waters and is perceived as a remote and vague figure who hides himself from mankind....
Deities name
"Kami-Musubi-No-Kami (divine producing wondrous deity)"
Shinto / Japan Creator being. The third in the list of primordial deities appearing in the Kojiki and Nibongi sacred texts. A remote and vaguely defined deity who was born alone in the cosmos and whose presence remains hidden from mankind. Probably influenced by Chinese religion....
Deities name
"Nzapa"
Ngbandi / Democratic Republic of Congo, central Africa Creator god. One of seven deities invoked at Sunrise each morning. The progenitor of all life on earth, he also gave mankind laws and controls destiny or fate. He has four children who specifically appear in the guise of palm trees....
Goddess name
"Izanagi-No-Kami (his augustness the one who invites)"
Shinto / Japan Creator god. One of seventeen beings involved in creation. His consort is IZANAMI-NO-KAMI. They are strictly of Japanese origin with no Chinese or Buddhist influence. Jointly they are responsible to the other fifteen primordial deities to “make, consolidate and give birth to this drifting land.” The reference, in the Kojiki sacred text, is to the reed beds which were considered to float on the primal waters. The pair were granted a heavenly jeweled spear and they stood upon the floating bridge of heaven, stirring the waters with the spear. When the spear was pulled up, the brine which dripped from it created the island of Onogoro, the first dry land, believed to be the island of Nu-Shima on the southern coast of Awagi. According to mythology, the pair created two beings, a son HIRUKO and an island Ahaji. They generated the remaining fourteen islands which make up Japan and then set about creating the rest of the KAMI pantheon. Izanagi's most significant offspring include AMATERASU, the Sun goddess, born from his nose and SUSANOWO, the storm god, born from his left eye, who are the joint rulers of the universe. Also IzanagiNo-Mikoto....
Deities name
"Tiki"
Polynesian / including Maori Creator god. One of the children of RANGINUI and PAPATUANUKU who created mankind. In some Polynesian traditions he is represented as the first man, akin to Adam. The word is also incorporated in tikiwananga or “god stick,” which describes the wooden or stone images of deities that are usually minimally worked and stand about 19.5 inches tall. Only thirty or so examples of these are known, most having been destroyed by Christian missions. The celebrated large Maori totems are depictions of ancestors who appear as human / bird or reptile hybrids. Also Ki'i (Hawaiian)....
Deities name
"Alatangana"
Kono / eastern Guinea, West Africa Creator god. One of two creator deities; the other is SA. ALATANGANA created land from swamp and placed vegetation on earth. VAJRAPANI and a large number of minor names.See also AMITABHA, AMOGHASIDDHI, RATNASAMBHAVA and VAIROCANA....
Deities name
"Nai-No-Kami"
Shinto / Japan earthquake god. One of the RAIJIN deities responsible for thunder, storms and Rain. His worship began in AD 599....
Goddess name
"Eriu"
Celtic / Irish Fertility goddess. An aspect of the MORRIGAN. One of the deities who were known as the “Sovereignty of Ireland” and wedded sym bolically to a mortal king. Also a warrior goddess, capable of changing shape from girl to hag, and into birds and animals. She is patroness of the royal seat of Uisnech in County Meath. Eire and Erin are corruptions of her name. See also BADB....
Goddess name
"Hiko-Sashiri-No-Kami"
Shinto / Japan God of carpenters. One of several minor deities involved in the building of a sacred hall of great beauty, used to entice the Sun goddess Amaterasu from her cave. Linked with the god TAOKI-HO-OI-NO-KAMI....
Deities name
"Whiro"
Polynesian / Maori God of death. Regarded as an errant son of the creator deities, RANGINUI and PAPATUANUKU, Whiro stands as the chief antagonist of TANEMAHUTA, the creator god of light. He is, therefore, the personification of darkness and evil. During the time of creation from chaos, Whiro is said to have fought an epic battle against Tanemahuta in the newly formed heavens. He was vanquished and forced to descend into the underworld where he became ruler over the dead and chief among the lesser underworld deities who are responsible for various forms of disease and sickness. In the temporal world the lizard, a symbol of death, embodies him, and various creatures of the night, including the owl and the bat, are earthly representatives from his kingdom, as are such malignant insect pests as the mosquito. This deity is not to be confused with the legendary human voyager and adventurer of the same name whose traditions have, in the past, often been muddled with those of the god....
Deities name
"Hastsezini"
Navaho / USA God of fire. A “black” god who is reclusive and generally apart from other deities. He is the inventor of fire and of the fire drill and board. His priest dresses in black and wears a black mask with white-bordered eye and mouth holes. The ceremonial fire drill is made from cedarwood....
Deities name
"O-Toshi-No-Kami"
Shinto / Japan God of harvests. The son of SUSANO-WO and Kamu-O-Ichi-Hime, he heads the pantheon of agricultural deities and is generally the guardian of rice fields....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.