8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Deity Ans" - 78 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
Deity name
"Tu Er Shen"
Chinese A Chinese deity who manages the love and sex between men. His name literally means "rabbit deity".
Deity name
"Abracadabra"
Assyrians A charm. It is said that Abracadabra was the supreme deity of the Assyrians. Q. Severus Sammonicus recommended the use of the word as a powerful antidote against ague, flux, and toothache. The word was to be written on parchment, and suspended round the neck by a linen thread.
Deity name
"Jnanaparamita"
Buddhist A deity who has perfected transcendent, super-human or supernatural knowledge. Buddhist
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Supreme god name
"Jumala"
Finland A generic name for a major deity. Originally the name given by the Finns to the sky, the sky-god, and the supreme god. Later taivas and Ukko were used as the names for the sky and the sky-god. The word means god and was later used for the Christian God. The origin of the word is unknown – some possible explanations are derivation from Jomali, the supreme deity of the Permians and origination from the Estonian word jume.
Goddess name
"Anumati"
Sanskrit A lunar deity and goddess of wealth, intellect, children, spirituality and prosperity. Also Anumati is a type of full moon day in which the moon remains slightly cut and not fully full moon called as Chaturdashi bhiddha purnima Sanskrit
Deity name
"Aglibol"
Roman / Syria / Greek / Palmaryia A lunar deity in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. His name means "Calf of Bel" ("Calf of the Lord"). He is depicted with a Lunar disk decorating his head, and sometimes his shoulders. Roman / Syria / Greek / Palmaryia
Deity name
"Pilumnus"
Roman A nature deity, brother of Piçúɱnus. He ensured children grew properly and stayed healthy. Ancient Romans made an extra bed after the birth of a child in order to ensure the help of Pilumnus. He also taught humanity how to grind grain and sometimes identified as the husband of Danae, and therefore the father of Danaus and the ancestor of Turnus. Roman
Deity name
"Munisvara"
Hindu / Dravidian A regional Tamil deity who is popular amongst the least Sanskritized social groups of South India specifically Tamil Nadu. Hindu / Dravidian
Deity name
"Ansa"
Hindu / Puranic A solar deity and one of the Adityas.Hindu / Puranic
Deity name
"Ma"
Comana A warlike deity identified by the Greeks with Enyo and by the Romans with Bellona. Comana
Goddess name
"Waka-Sa-Na-Me-No-Kami"
Shinto / Japan Agricultural goddess. The deity specifically concerned with the transplanting of young rice. A daughter of Ha-Yama-To-No-Kami and O-Ge-Tsu-Hime. Generally served by Buddhist priests. See also WAKA-TOSHI-NO-KAMI and KUKU-TOSHI-NO-KAMI....
Deity name
"Khonsu"
Egypt Aka Chons, Khensu, Khons, Khonsu or Khonshu, is an ancient lunar deity, from before formal structure was given to a pantheon. His name reflects the fact that the moon travels across the night sky, for it means The Wanderer, and also had the titles Embracer, Pathfinder, and Defender, as he was thought to watch over night travelers. Egypt
Deity name
"Abracax"
Greek Also written Abraxas or Abrasax, in Persian mythology denotes the Supreme Being. In Greek notation it stands for 365. In Persian mythology Abracax presides over 365 impersonated virtues, one of which is supposed to prevail on each day of the year. In the second century the word was employed by the Basilidians for the deity; it was also the principle of the Gnostic hierarchy, and that from which sprang their numerous Æons.
God name
"Ningishzida"
Sumerian An underworld Mesopotamian deity, the patron of Medicine, and also a God of nature. His name in Sumerian means "lord of the good tree". Sumerian
God name
"Ki (the great one)"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian Archetypal chthonic principle. According to some traditions, Ki is the daughter of ANS'AR and KIS'AR and consort of AN. As the cosmos came into being, An took the role of god of heaven and Ki became the personification of the earth and underworld. She is the mother of the god of the air, ENLIL, with whom she descended from the heavens. Some authorities argue that she was never regarded as a deity. There is no evidence of a cult and the name appears in a limited number of Sumerian creation texts. The name URAS (tilth) may relate.See also ANTU(M)....
God name
"Baiame / Baayami / Baayama"
Australia Baiame aka Baayami or Baayama, the ancestor and patron god of the Kamilaroi. He is a sky god and a deity of death and life, and a god of Rain and the shamans. Australia
God name
"Shango"
Yoruba / Nigeria, West Africa Chthonic storm god. As an earth deity he was once a mortal man, the king of Oyo, who transformed himself into an immortal. According to tradition, during his life he breathed tongues of fire. He then ascended into the sky by climbing a golden chain and became the god of thunder and lightning. He is also god of justice, punishing thieves and liars. His consorts include OYA, Oshun and Oba. Cult followers of Shango are believed to be able to make lightning strike an adversary. In shrines to Shango, the image of the god is adorned with a ram's head. Also SANGO....
Spirit name
"Wakai Taaika"
Dakota Indian / USA Creator god. A remote and vaguely defined deity invoked by the shamans of the tribe. Also a generic term equating to the spirit which, in an animistic and shamanistic religion, all things existing in nature possess....
Spirit name
"Wakonea"
Omaha Indian / USA Creator god. A remote and vaguely defined deity invoked by the shamans of the tribe. Also a generic term equating to the spirit which, in an animistic and shamanistic religion, all things existing in nature possess....
Spirit name
"Tate"
Sioux / USA Creator god. He appears in the clouds, his voice is the wind and he controls the changing of the seasons. He is also the guide of the spirits of the dead. He is the deity with whom the Sioux shamans intercede....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.