8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Deity Roma" - 71 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
Deity name
"Roma"
Roman 1 A deity personifying the Roman state, or an personification in art of the city of Rome
God name
"Mogounos"
Britain A Celtic god worshipped in Roman Britain and in Gaul. The main evidence is from altars dedicated to the god by Roman soldiers, but the deity is not a native Italic one.
Deity name
"Pales"
Roman A deity of shepherds, flocks and livestock. Roman
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Deity name
"Aglibol"
Roman / Syria / Greek / Palmaryia A lunar deity in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. His name means "Calf of Bel" ("Calf of the Lord"). He is depicted with a Lunar disk decorating his head, and sometimes his shoulders. Roman / Syria / Greek / Palmaryia
Deity name
"Disciplina"
Roman A minor deity and the personification of discipline. Roman
Deity name
"Pilumnus"
Roman A nature deity, brother of Piçúɱnus. He ensured children grew properly and stayed healthy. Ancient Romans made an extra bed after the birth of a child in order to ensure the help of Pilumnus. He also taught humanity how to grind grain and sometimes identified as the husband of Danae, and therefore the father of Danaus and the ancestor of Turnus. Roman
Goddess name
"Numeria or Numerius"
Roman A praenomen given to those who were born quickly; and that women in childbirth were accustomed to pray to a goddess Numeria, who must have been a deity of some importance, as the pontifex mentioned her in the ancient prayers. Roman
Deity name
"Erebos"
Greek / Roman A primordial deity, different
Deity name
"Ma"
Comana A warlike deity identified by the Greeks with Enyo and by the Romans with Bellona. Comana
Spirit name
"Lar Familiaris"
Roman Ancestral spirit. A personal and vaguely defined deity brought into the house from the surrounding land....
Planet name
"Saturnus"
Roman Astral god. Identified with the planet Saturn, but thought to have originated as an agricultural deity concerned with sowing of seed. A sanctuary existed on the Roman forum from as early as 450 BC, also functioning as the imperial treasury. Saturnus was celebrated in the Saturnalia festival (December 17-19) during which masters and slaves exchanged roles and candles were given as gifts to symbolize the Winter darkness....
God name
"Midir"
Celtic / Irish Chthonic god. Appears in polymorphic form. According to legend the consort of Etain and ruler of the land of Mag Mor. He lost an eye when hit by a hazel wand; the eye was replaced by DIANCECHT, the physician god. In Roman times he became more of an underworld deity. Also Mider....
Goddess name
"Tellus"
Roman Chthonic primordial earth mother. A corn deity, generally regarded as benevolent, but also a goddess of the dead. Enemy armies were offered to her and cursed in her name. Both she and the corn goddess CERES were propitiated with human sacrifice. Also TERRA MATER....
Goddess name
"Sulis"
Roman / Celtic Chthonic underworld goddess. Also a deity concerned with knowledge and prophecy. The tutelary goddess of the thermal waters at Bath, England, she is closely linked with the Roman goddess MINERVA....
Goddess name
"Ma"
Cappadocian / Anatolia / Turkey Fertility and vegetation goddess. The tutelary goddess of Pontic Comana, she was served by votary priestesses acting as sacred prostitutes, and biennial festivals were celebrated in her honor. Gradually she took on an added role as a warrior goddess with solar connotations and ultimately became syncretized with the Roman goddess BELLONA. On coins of the Comana region she is depicted with the radiate head of a solar deity carrying weapons and a shield....
God name
"Priapos"
Greco - Roman / Phrygian Fertility god. The son of DIONYSOS and APHRODITE, he was also a guardian of mariners. Priapos was not regarded as a significant deity in Greece until very late times—during the Macedonian period, circa fourth to second century BC—and was only locally popular during the Roman Empire period. He is particularly known from Phrygia and is depicted as a satyr-like creature with pronounced genitals....
Goddess name
"Egeria"
Roman Fertility goddess. deity of oak trees whose priestess enacted an annual sacred marriage with the king of Rome, who took the part of JUPITER. The festival is a variation of that celebrating the marriage of ZEUS and HERA which took place in Athens. A number of springs and lakes were sacred to her....
Spirit name
"Agathos Daimon (good demon)"
Greco - Roman God of fortune. Known locally from Alexandria and depicted in the form of a snake. May have originated as an androgynous fertility spirit, but later becomes identified as the consort of Agathe Tyche (see TYCHE). Libations were made regularly to this deity after meals and he was regarded as a friendly household guardian....
God name
"Aesculapius"
Roman God of healing. Developed from the Greek deity ASKLEPIOS and introduced into Rome in 293 BC as a plague god. Attributes include the caduceus (winged scepter), the symbol of modern Medicine....
Planet name
"Neptunus"
Italic / Roman God of irrigation. Identified with the planet Neptune, but thought to have originated as an agricultural deity concerned with watering. He was celebrated in the festival of Neptunalia on July 23. Also the patron deity of horseracing. He became syncretized with the Greek god POSEIDON, but Neptune's modern åśśociation with the sea is a misrepresentation....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.