8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Deity Roma" - 71 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
God name
"Aesculapius"
Roman God of healing. Developed from the Greek deity ASKLEPIOS and introduced into Rome in 293 BC as a plague god. Attributes include the caduceus (winged scepter), the symbol of modern Medicine....
Deities name
"Aether"
Greco - Roman Primordial god of light. A remote cosmic deity, the son of EREBOS (darkness) and NYX (night) who overthrew these archetypal deities of chaos. In Hesiod's Epic Cycle he is also described as the father of OURANOS....
Spirit name
"Agathos Daimon (good demon)"
Greco - Roman God of fortune. Known locally from Alexandria and depicted in the form of a snake. May have originated as an androgynous fertility spirit, but later becomes identified as the consort of Agathe Tyche (see TYCHE). Libations were made regularly to this deity after meals and he was regarded as a friendly household guardian....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Deity name
"Aglibol"
Roman / Syria / Greek / Palmaryia A lunar deity in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. His name means "Calf of Bel" ("Calf of the Lord"). He is depicted with a Lunar disk decorating his head, and sometimes his shoulders. Roman / Syria / Greek / Palmaryia
Goddess name
"Ah Kin (he of the sun)"
Mayan / Mesoamerican / Mexico Sun god. A deity of ambivalent personality, the young suitor of the moon goddess Acna, also the aged Sun god in the sky. He is feared as the bringer of drought, but also protects mankind from the powers of evil åśśociated with darkness. Said to be carried through the underworld at night on the shoulders of the god Sucunyum. Ah Kin is prayed to at Sunrise and rituals include the burning of incense. He is invoked to cure illness and to bring wives to bachelors. Attributes include a square third eye subtended by a loop, a strong Roman nose, a squint and incisor teeth filed to a T-shape. Also Acan Chob (Lacandon); Chi Chac Chob; Kinich Ahau; God G....
God name
"Ambisagrus aka Bussumarus"
Britain Originally from Gaul, where his Celtic identity was lost during the Roman takeover where he took all the characteristics of the Roman God Jupiter. weather deity who controlled the Rain, wind, hail and fog. Britain
Goddess name
"Andrasta"
Roman / Celtic / British Goddess of war. The patron goddess of the Iceni tribe. The warrior queen Boudicca is reported to have prayed to her before battle and she was the recipient of human sacrifice. Andrasta does not appear in Celtic Gaul, though a deity called Andraste is mentioned by the...
God name
"Anextiomarus"
Roman / Celtic / British Local tribal deity. God of uncertain affinities but linked with APOLLO....
Goddess name
"Arduinna"
Roman / Celtic / European Goddess of Forests and hunting. Known only from inscriptions and figurines in the Ardennes region. Depicted riding on the back of a wild boar and presumed to be a guardian deity of boars. Identified by the Romans with the goddess DIANA....
Goddess name
"Arnemetia"
Roman / Celtic / British water goddess. A deity known only from inscriptions....
Goddess name
"BAAL (lord)"
Western Semitic / Canaanite / northern Israel, Lebanon / later Egypt vegetation deity and national god. Baal may have originated in pre-agricultural times as god of storms and Rain. He is the son of DAGAN and in turn is the father of seven storm gods, the Baalim of the Vetus Testamentum, and seven midwife goddesses, the SASURATUM. He is considered to have been worshiped from at least the nineteenth century BC. Later he became a vegetation god concerned with fertility of the land. From the mid-sixteenth century BC in the Egyptian New kingdom, Baal enjoyed a significant cult following, but the legend of his demise and restoration was never equated with that of OSIRIS. In the Greco-Roman period, Baal became åśśimilated in the Palestine region with ZEUS and JUPITER, but as a Punic deity [Carthage] he was allied with SATURNUS, the god of seed-sowing....
Deities name
"Baa! Samin (lord of heaven)"
Western Semitic / Phoenician Head of the pantheon. Probably originated in Canaanite culture as a god of Rain and vegetation, but became extensively revered in places as far apart as Cyprus and Carthage. Epithets include “bearer of thunder.” Baal Samin is first mentioned in a fourteenth century BC treaty between the Hittite king Suppiluliuma and Nigmadu II of Ugarit. He had a major sanctuary at Byblos, according to inscription, “built by Yehemilk.” Josephus confirms that his cult existed at the time of Solomon. At Karatepe his name appears at the head of a list of national deities and on Seleucid coinage he is depicted wearing a half-moon crown and carrying a radiate Sun disc. Other epithets include “lord of eternity” and he may also have been god of storms at sea, a patron deity of mariners. By Hellenic times he equated with ZEUS in the Greek pantheon and the Romans identified him as Caelus (sky). Also Baal-Samem....
God name
"Bacax"
Roman - North African Local god. A rare example of a named deity from this region, thought to have been worshiped as a cave god. Known from inscription at Cirta [Constantine]....
Deity name
"Chaos"
Greco Roman Primordial deity. The amorphous male power who, with the female presence, NYX, personifies the empty space which existed before the formation of the cosmos....
God name
"Contrebis"
Roman / Celtic / British Local god. Identified from an inscription at Lancaster in conjunction with another deity, IALONUS....
God name
"Corus"
Roman God of wind. Specifically the deity responsible for the northwest winds....
Deity name
"Disciplina"
Roman A minor deity and the personification of discipline. Roman
Goddess name
"Discordia"
Roman Minor goddess of dissent. Modeled on the Greek deity ERIS....
God name
"Eacus"
Romano - Iberian weather god. Known from the area of Castille and syncretized with the local Roman deity Jupiter Solutorius....
Goddess name
"Egeria"
Roman Fertility goddess. deity of oak trees whose priestess enacted an annual sacred marriage with the king of Rome, who took the part of JUPITER. The festival is a variation of that celebrating the marriage of ZEUS and HERA which took place in Athens. A number of springs and lakes were sacred to her....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.