8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "God Age" - 330 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
God name
"Gigantes"
Greek According to Homer, they were a gigantic and savage race of men, governed by Eurymedon, and dwelling in the distant west, in the island of Thrinacia; but they were extirpated by Eurymedon on account of their insolence towards the gods. Greek
God name
"Harmonia"
Greek A daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, or, according to others, of Zeus and Electra, the daughter of Atlas, in Samothrace. When Athena åśśigned to Cadmus the government of Thebes, Zeus gave him Harmoia for his wife, and all the gods of Olympus were present at the marriage. Cadmus on that day made her a present of a peplus and a necklace, which he had received either from Hephaestus or from Europa. Greek
Goddess name
"Hera/ Here"
Greek A goddess of childbirth, marriage, motherhood, of the sky, & storms
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Hesperides"
Greek These goddesses of evenings and the golden light of Sunset were the famous guardians of the golden apples which Ge had given to Hera at her marriage with Zeus. Their names are Aegle, Erytheia, Hestia, and Arethusa, but their descent is not the same in the different traditions; sometimes they are called the daughters of night or Erebus (Theogony of Hesiod 215), sometimes of Phorcys and Ceto, sometimes of Atlas and Hesperis, whence their names Atlantides or Hesperides, and sometimes of Hesperus, or of Zeus and Themis Greek
God name
"Hymen"
Greek The god of marriage, was conceived as a handsome youth, and invoked in the hymeneal or bridal song. The names originally designated the bridal song itself, which was subsequently personified. The first trace of this personification occurs in Euripides or perhaps in Sappho. Greek
Goddess name
"Hymenaeus"
Greek This poor god is the goddess of marriage
God name
"Intonsus"
Greek I. e. unshorn, a surname of Apollo and Bacchus, alluding to the eternal youth of these gods, as the Greek youths allowed their hair to grow until they attained the age of manhood, though in the case of Apollo it may also allude to his being the god of the Sun, whence the long floating hair would indicate the rays of the Sun. Greek
Goddess name
"Juga Or Jugalis"
Greek That is, the goddess of marriage, occurs as a surname of Juno, in the same sense as the Greek Zygia.
God name
"Laodameia"
Greek A daughter of Acastus, and wife of Protesilaus. As the latter, shortly after his marriage, joined the Greeks in their expedition against Troy, and was the first that was killed there, Laodameia sued for the favour of the gods to be allowed to converse with him only for three hours. The request was granted: Hermes led Protesilaus back to the upper world, and when Protesilaus died a second time, Laodameia died with him. Greek
God name
"Lysius"
Greek I. e. the Deliverer, a surname of Dionysus, under which he was worshipped at Corinth, where there was a carved image of the god, the whole figure of which was gilt, while the face was painted red. Greek
Goddess name
"Melpomene"
Greek The singing goddess, one of the nine Muses, became afterwards the Muse of Tragedy. Greek
God name
"Moros"
Greek The personification of impending doom, who drove every being, mortal, god, or whatever else to his fated doom. He was omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent, and not even Zeus can defeat him. He was a son of Erebus and Nyx, and brother of the Moirae, his agents and servants. Greek
God name
"Murcury"
Greek The name Mercury is connected with the root merx (merchandise) and mercari (to deal, trade). The early Romans, being above all countrymen, had no need for a god of commerce. The Roman Mercury appeared only about the fifth century BCE. and was exclusively the god of merchants. For long he was known only in this capacity so that Plautus, in his prologue to Amphitryon, reminds his audience that Mercury presided over messages and commerce. Like certain other minor divinities - Pecunia, Aesculåñuś, Argentinus - he watched over tradesmen's profits. Greek
God name
"Myrrah"
Greek A daughter of Cinyras and, mother of Adonis. Aphrodite inspired Myrrha with lust to commit incest with her father, Theias. Myrrha's nurse helped with the scheme. When Theias discovered this, he flew into a rage, chasing his daughter with a knife. The gods turned her into a myrrh tree and Adonis eventually sprung from this tree. Greek
God name
"Neleus"
Greek A son of Cretheus and Tyro, the daughter of Salmoneus. Tyro, previous to her marriage with Neleus, is said to have loved the river-god Enipeus and in the form of Enipeus Poseidon once appeared to her, and became by her the father of Pelias and Neleus. Tyro exposed the two boys, but they were found and reared by horse-herds, and when they had grown up they learned who their mother was, and Pelias killed their foster-mother, who had ill-used Tyro. Greek
Goddess name
"Senecta"
Greek Goddess of old age Greek
Goddess name
"Kore (tbe girl)"
Greek Youthful goddess of the corn. The more generic name for the goddess PERSEPHONE. Identified as the daughter of DEMETER. She is the spirit of the corn as distinct from her mother who is the giver of the corn. Depicted on coinage as a woman's head adorned with ears of corn. She is integral to the Eleusinian Mysteries in which she is abducted to Hades, resulting in the distress of her mother and the blighting of nature. At Samaria-Sebaste in Syrio-Palestine, Kore was the only deity worshiped, apart from the emperor....
God name
"Narkissos"
Greek Minor god. The son of the river god Kephissos, he wasted away after falling in love with his own image reflected in water. The gods took pity on him and changed him into the flower of the same name. In Roman religion he becomes Narcissus....
God name
"Proteus"
Greek Minor sea god. Depicted as an old man who attends Triton and whose principal concern is the creatures of the oceans. He also has oracular powers. The poet cowper wrote: “In ages past old Proteus, with his droves Of sea calves sought the mountains and the groves.” Also known as GLAUKOS, NEREUS and PHORKYS....
God name
"Hymenaios"
Greek / Roman A god of marriage
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.