8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "God Men" - 587 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Spirit name
"Epimetheus"
Greek / Roman Minor creator god. One of the four sons of IAPETOS and Klymene (Titan), and the brother of PROMETHEUS. Jointly responsible for the creation of mankind. Epimetheus' strongest claim to fame lies in his liaison with the first mortal woman, Pandora, whom the gods had cautioned him to avoid. Her curiosity caused her to open the box belonging to JUPITER in which he had placed all the vices, diseases and sufferings of humanity, but which also included the benevolent spirit of hope....
Goddess name
"Eriiys"
Greek Chthonic goddess of wrath. According to legend she was a consort of POSEIDON by whom she bore the fabulous horse Areon. By implication she may also have been a grim maternal figure who engendered all horses. She may be equated with a wrathful DEMETER who is sometimes given the epithet Erinys. Erinys appears in the collec tive form of three Erinyes, their heads covered with snake locks and bearing torches from the underworld. In the Iliad they are described as those “who beneath the earth punish dead men, whoever has sworn a false oath.” In Roman mythology they are the Furies....
Goddess name
"Eris"
Greek Goddess of dissent or strife. The consort of ARES, the god of war, and the mother of HORKOS (oath). She is depicted throwing the apple of discord among guests at a wedding, offering it “to the fairest” to provoke argument. In Roman mythology she becomes DISCORDIA....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Es"
Ket / Siberian Creator god. Described as an old man with a long black beard, he fashioned the first humans from clay. Those tossed from his right hand became men, and those from his left became women....
God name
"Eshu"
Yoruba / Nigeria, West Africa Itinerant god. An ancient deity regarded as the attendant and messenger of the creator god OLODUMARE. He påśśes among mortal people åśśessing character and meting out punishment. Devotees are identified by necklaces of black or brown beads....
God name
"Esus"
Celtic / Continental / European God of war. Mentioned by the Roman writer Lucan but otherwise virtually unknown. He may have originated as a tree god. One carving [Trier] identifies Esus felling a tree with birds in the branches (see also INANA). Elsewhere he is åśśociated with three cranes and a bull....
God name
"Esus aka Essus"
Gaul God of boatmen, fond of cutting branches from trees with his axe. Gaul
Goddess name
"Eumenides"
Grek Eumenides [the good-tempered goddesses ]. A name given by the Greeks to the Furies, as it would have been ominous and bad policy to call them by their right name, Erinnyes.
Goddess name
"Eumenides/ Erinyes"
Greek A goddesses of justice
God name
"Faro"
Bambara / Mali, West Africa River god. Regarded as the deity who brought order to the world at the time of creation. He impregnated himself and gave birth to twins who were the first human beings. He is also the progenitor of fish stocks in the river Niger. His chief adversary is the god of the desert wind, TELIKO. Faro is propitiated annually by a Komo society of men in a ritual of dancing. They use a special mask which is created anew each year. According to legend Faro came to earth after a long period of drought during which most of the living things died. He also gave mankind the gift of speech....
Goddess name
"Fata-Morgana"
Celtic Goddess of the sea, illusion, enchantment, fate and death and queen of the Fortunate Isles. Celtic
God name
"Fates"
Greek Properly signifies "a share," and as a personification "the deity who åśśigns to every man his fate or his share," or the Fates. Homer usually speaks of only one Moira, and only once mentions the Motpai in the plural. In his poems Moira is fate personified, which, at the birth of man, spins out the thread of his future life, follows his steps, and directs the consequences of his actions according to the counsel of the gods. Homer thus, when he personifies Fate, conceives her as spinning, an act by which also the power of other gods over the life of man is expressed. Greek
Goddess name
"Feng Po Po"
China Goddess of the wind and embodies the elements of air and water. China
Goddess name
"Feronia"
Roman Goddess of orchards and protects freed men. Roman Also regarded as a goddess of the earth or the lower world because she is said to have given to her son three souls, so that Evander had to kill him thrice before he was dead. Roman
God name
"Firie"
Zaire A supreme sky god who controls the elements. Zaire
God name
"Fjorgynn"
Norse God mentioned in Snorri's Edda. Norse
Goddess name
"Flora"
Roman Goddess of gardens, plants, flowers, love, prostitution,spring and youth. Her festival was celebrated from the 28th of April till the first of May, with extravagant merriment and lasciviousness. The resemblance between the names Flora and Chloris led the later Romans to identify the two divinities. Roman
God name
"Forseti"
Norse / Germanic A god of justice for men & gods
Goddess name
"Fortuna"
Roman Goddess of good fortune. A deity who particularly appealed to women, partly in an oracular context. She is depicted carrying a globe, rudder and cornucopiae. She probably evolved from the model of the Greek goddess TYCHE. Her main symbol is the wheel of fate which she may stand upon and Renaissance artists tended to depict her thus. Among her more celebrated sanctuaries in Rome, the temple of Fortuna Redux was built by Domitian to celebrate his victories in Germany. She is depicted in a well-known stone carving in Gloucester Museum, England, holding her three main attributes....
Goddess name
"Freya, Freyja"
Norse Freya or Freyja [Feminine of Freyr]. The daughter of Njord and sister of Frey. She dwells in Folkvang. Half the fallen in battle belong to her, the other half to Odin. She lends her feather disguise to Loke. She is the goddess of love. Her husband is Oder. Her necklace is Brisingamen. She has a boar with golden bristles. Norse
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.