8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "God Rua" - 18 records

Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Muso Koroni (the pure woman with the primeval soul)"
Bambara / Mali, West Africa Chthonic fertility goddess. The mother of all living things, she introduced mankind to the principles of farming. She has a terrifying appearance, depicted either in human form, sometimes with many breasts (cf. ARTEMIS at Ephesus), or as a panther. In the latter guise she uses her claws to bring on menstruation in women and to cirçúɱcise both sexes. Prior to cirçúɱ cision a youth is said to possess wanzo, an untamed wildness. Muso Koroni is pursued by the Sun god, PEMBA, who impregnates her in the form of a tree (Acacia albida). Also Mousso Coronie....
God name
"Lalaia'il"
Bella Coola Indian / British Columbia, Canada God of shamans. The deity who initiates into the shamanistic circle. He lives in the Forest and carries a wooden wand bound with cedar bark which he waves, creating a singing noise. He also frequents woodland lakes and ponds. When a woman meets him she is said to menstruate, while a man develops a nose bleed. Also Kle-klati-e'il....
Goddess name
"Druantia"
Celtic A goddess
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"BRIGIT (exalted one)"
Celtic / Continental / European / Irish Fertility goddess. A major Celtic pastoral deity, described as a “wise woman, the daughter of the DAGDA,” Brigit became “Christianized” as St. Brigit of Kildare, who lived from AD 450-523 and founded the first female Christian community in Ireland. She was originally celebrated on February 1 in the festival of Imbolc....
Goddess name
"Rudrani"
Hindu Goddess. An epithet of DURGA, impersonated by a young pre-menstrual girl in the Durga festivals....
Goddess name
"Bo Ruadh"
Ireland Goddess who helped bring fertility to barren. Ireland
God name
"Cromm Cruaich"
Ireland Ancient deity, a harvest, death and sacrificial God. It is thought human sacrifices were once made to him at Samhain. Ireland
Goddess name
"Crone"
Ireland Third aspect of the Triple goddess. She signifies old age or death, Winter, the end of all things, the waning moon, post-mentrual phases of women's lives. Ireland
Goddess name
"Nirmali"
Kafir / Afghanistan Birth goddess. Goddess of the childbirth but usually separated from the rest of the village. She is invoked by women during labor or menstruation. Her sacred animal is the ram. There is an argument that she is, in fact, a manifestation of the goddess Disani rather than a distinct deity. Also Shuwe....
Goddess name
"Zarpanitu(m)"
Mesopotamian / Babylonian - Akkadian Birth goddess. The consort of MARDIJK whose marriage was celebrated annually at New Year in Babylon. Also Erua; SARPANITJM....
Goddess name
"Nze"
Ngbandi / Democratic Republic of Congo, Central Africa moon god. One of the seven children of KETUA, the god of fortune and LOMO, the goddess of peace. He is closely linked with women and fertility. At menstruation he is said to have “cut the girl” and, during pregnancy, “the moon is dark for her.”...
Deities name
"Anu-Mate"
Polynesian God of space. One of the sons of RANGINUI by Pokoharua, the sister of TANGAROA, the sea god. He belongs to a group of deities engendered at the time of creation that includes ANU-MATE, Anu-Matao, Anu-Whakarere and Anu-Whakatoro, all of whom rule over different aspects of space above the upper world. AnuMate is perceived as the god responsible for the “space of cold death” and in fact all of the group are envisaged as deities ruling over realms of great cold....
Deities name
"Hanui-o-Rangi (fatber of winds)"
Polynesian God of winds and weather. He is the son of the sky god RANGINUI, who fathered him on one of his early consorts, Pokoharua, the sister of TANGAROA, the sea god. All the subsequent descendants of Hanui-o-Rangi are believed to rule over various aspects of the weather. Hanui thus fathered Tawhiri, the god of the northwest wind, whose son was Tiu. They control the fierce storms from the east. The children of Tiu include Hine-I-Tapapauta and Hine-Tu-Whenua, the deities overseeing the more gentle westerly winds. Hine-Tu-Whenua is the mother of Hakona-Tipu and Pua-I-Taha, controlling the southern and southwesterly gales....
Goddess name
"Ruamoko"
Polynesian / Maori God of volcanoes and earthquakes. According to tradition, Ruamoko is the youngest son of RANGINUI and PAPATUANUXU and is possessed by a formidable temper. When his older siblings set about separating the prime parents from their eternal lovemaking in order to allow light into the space between sky and earth, he was enraged and his boisterous tantrum became revealed in the violence of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Ruamoko is of less importance than PELE, the chief volcano goddess of Polynesia, who is revered mainly in Hawaii....
God name
"Tonitrualis"
Roman A surname of the god Jupiter, to whom the Romans attributed power over all the changes in the heavens, as Rain, storms, thunder and lightning.
God name
"Lupercus"
Roman God of wolves. Celebrated in the festival of Lupercalia on February 15....
God name
"Terminus"
Roman God of påśśage. Embodied in boundary marker stones. He was celebrated in the Termi nalia festival on February 23....
God name
"Rua"
Tahiti God of craftsmen and big holes in the ground. Tahiti

8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.