8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Goddess Arstat" - 45 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Agwe"
Haiti Goddess manifestation of Yemanja Haiti / Vodun
Goddess name
"Agwe"
Haiti / Vodun A goddess manifestation of Yemanja
Goddess name
"Ala"
Ibo / eastern Nigeria, West Africa Chthonic fertility goddess. A popular deity who is also goddess of the underworld linked with a cult of the dead (which rest in her womb). Her temple is the Mbari which contains a cult statue depicting the goddess seated with a child in her arms and adorned with the crescent moon. She is flanked by attendant deities. She enjoys a profusion of local shrines which are well supplied with votive offerings. Serious crimes including murder are considered to be offenses against her. An annual yam festival is celebrated in her honor. Also Ale, Ana, ANI....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Ama-arhus"
Mesopotamian / BabylonianAkkadian Fertility goddess. Mentioned in texts as being among the pantheon at Uruk in Hellenistic times but also found as an earlier manifestation of the god GULA. Also Arad-Ama-arhus, Amat-Ama-arhus....
Goddess name
"Amaunet (the hidden one)"
Egypt / Upper Fertility goddess. Amaunet seems to have a taken a role as an early consort of AMUN, one of the eight deities of the OGDOAD and representing hidden power. In that context she is depicted anthropomorphically but with the head of a snake. She is shown in reliefs and as the subject of a notable statue from the Record Hall of Tuthmosis III at the Karnak complex of Thebes, where she was recognized as a benign protective deity especially called on at times of royal accession. As a fertility goddess she was largely eclipsed by the goddess MUT. She is sometimes equated with NEITH, the creator goddess of Sais, and her attributes may include the red crown of the Delta....
Goddess name
"Angerona"
Roman Goddess of anguish, secrecy, silence and the Winter solstice. According to one clåśś of påśśages she is the goddess of anguish and fear, that is, the goddess who not only produces this state of mind, but also relieves men from it. Roman
Goddess name
"Aphrodite"
Greek One of the great Olympian divinities, according to the popular and poetical notions of the Greeks, the goddess of love and beauty. Some traditions stated that she had sprung from the foam of the sea, which had gathered around the mutilated parts of Uråñuś, that had been thrown into the sea by Cronus after he had unmanned his father. (Theogony of Hesiod)
Goddess name
"Arinna (sun goddess)"
Hittite / Hurrian Solar deity. May have taken androgynous form, but also identified as the consort of the weather god TESUB. Probably the head of the Hittite state pantheon. There is little detail because the religious center of Arinna is knownonly from texts. The Sun goddess was also perceived to be a paramount chthonic or earth goddess. She becomes largely syncretized with the Hurrian goddess HEBAT....
Goddess name
"Ar·stat"
Persian Persian goddess of justice and Order.
Goddess name
"Atum"
Egypt The first god, having arisen by his own force himself, sitting on a mound (benben), from the primordial waters (Nu). Early myths state that Atum created the god Shu and goddess Tefnut from his √åǧïñå by masturbation in the city of Annu. Egypt
Goddess name
"Benten-San"
Shinto / Japan Goddess of luck. One of seven deities clåśśed as gods of fortune and the only goddess in the group. A popular deity with many sanctuaries dedicated to her, she is a patron of music and holds a biwa instrument in her hand. Snakes, believed to stand for jealousy, are often coiled around her statues. Because of this, married couples are reluctant to visit her shrines together. Her priesthood is both Shinto and Buddhist and she is closely linked with the goddess SARASVATI....
Goddess name
"Elara"
Greek A daughter of Orchomenus or Minyas, who became by Zeus the mother of the giant Tityus and Zeus, from fear of Hera, concealed her under the earth. (Apollodorus i. Argonautica) This was where she gave birth to Tityas, who some traditions state to be the son of Elara and Gaia, the earth goddess. Greek
Goddess name
"Gad"
Western Semitic / Punic / Carthaginian God of uncertain status. Probably concerned with chance or fortune and known from Palmyrene inscriptions, and from the Vetus Testamentum in place names such as Baal-Gad and Midal-Gad. Popular across a wide area of Syrio-Palestine and Anatolia in preBiblical times. Thought to have been syncretized ultimately with the Greek goddess TYCHE....
Goddess name
"Gunura"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian deity of uncertain status. Described variously as the husband of the goddess NIN'INSINA and the father of Damu (DUMUZI), but also as the sister of Damu....
Goddess name
"Hadad"
Western Semitic / Syrian / Phoenician weather god. Derived from the Akkadian deity ADAD. In texts found at the site of the ancient Canaanite capital of Ugarit [Ras Samra] , the name of Hadad apparently becomes a substitute for that of BAAL. His voice is described as roaring from the clouds and his weapon is the thunderbolt. His mother is the goddess ASERAH. During Hellenic times he was predominantly worshiped at Ptolemais and Hierapolis. His Syrian consort is ATARGATIS, who overshadowed him in local popularity at Hierapolis. Statues of the two deities were carried in procession to the sea twice yearly. According to the Jewish writer Josephus, Hadad also enjoyed a major cult following at Damascus in the eighth and ninth centuries BC. By the third century BC the Hadad-Atargatis cult had extended to Egypt, when he becomes identified as the god SUTEKH. In the Greek tradition his consort becomes HERA.See also ADAD....
Goddess name
"Hermaphroditos"
Greek God (Goddess) of uncertain status. The offspring of HERMES and APHRODITE and the lover of the water nymph Salmakis. Tradition has it that their påśśion for one another was so great that they merged into a single androgynous being....
Goddess name
"Hermraphroditos"
Greek A god that it became one with a goddess & is now of uncertain status
Goddess name
"Hertha"
Scandinavian Mother earth. Worshipped by all the Scandinavian tribes with orgies and mysterious rites, celebrated in the dark. Her veiled statue was transported from district to district by cows which no hand but the priest's was allowed to touch. Tacitus calls this goddess Cybele.
Goddess name
"Hetepes-Sekhus"
Egypt Chthonic underworld goddess. A minor deity accompanied by a retinue of crocodiles. As one of the manifestations of the vengeful “eye of RE,” she destroys the souls of the adversaries of the underworld ruler OSIRIS. Depicted as a cobra or anthropomorphically with a cobra's head....
Goddess name
"Ini Heret"
Egypt She is the goddess of mediators, diplomats, statesman's & other professional liars
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.