8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Goddess Imo" - 73 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"AMATERASU-O-MI-KAMI"
Shinto / Japan Sun goddess. The central figure of Shintoism and the ancestral deity of the imperial house. One of the daughters of the primordial god IZANAGI and said to be his favorite offspring, she was born from his left eye. She is the sibling of SUSANO-WO, the storm god. According to mythology she and Susano-Wo are obliged to join each other in order to survive....
Goddess name
"Adidharma (the primeval law)"
Buddhist - Lamaist / Tibet Primordial goddess. Particularly worshiped in Lamaism, she is the SAKTI of ADIBUDDHA. Attributes: cup and knife....
Goddess name
"Aditya (descendant of Aditi)"
Hindu / Vedic / Puranic Collective name for Sun gods. These numbered six in Vedic times but later increased to twelve. The sons of the primordial goddess ADITI. Also an epithet for SURYA. Attributes: two or more lotuses....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Ammavaru"
Hindu / India / Dravidian Primordial mother goddess who laid an egg that hatched into the Divine trinity of Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva. Hindu / India / Dravidian
Goddess name
"Ammavaru"
Hindu - Dravidian Primordial mother goddess. Known locally from east central India and worshiped by the Dravidian tribe of Telugu. She is said to have generated the cosmic egg in the sea of milk from which the major gods BRAHMA, VIS'NU and SIVA were born....
Goddess name
"Anu/ Anann/ Dana/ Dana Ana/ Catana"
Irish A mother goddess åśśociated with fertility & the primordial mother
Goddess name
"Arm (2)"
Celtic / Irish Chthonic mother goddess. Closely åśśociated with fertility and the primordial mother of the TUATHA DE DANANN. Twin hills near Killarney in Munster are called “The Paps of Anu.” Also Ana....
Goddess name
"Atum"
Egypt The first god, having arisen by his own force himself, sitting on a mound (benben), from the primordial waters (Nu). Early myths state that Atum created the god Shu and goddess Tefnut from his √åǧïñå by masturbation in the city of Annu. Egypt
Goddess name
"Birrahgnooloo"
Australian aboriginal Creator goddess. She is recognized by several aboriginal clans as the chief consort of BAIAME, the creator god. Revered as the all-mother of humankind and creator of living things on earth, her role largely parallels that of Baiame. Traditions suggest that during the Dreamtime she planted vegetation as she moved through the primordial world, fashioning creatures from clay and breathing spirit into human beings. Her eldest son is DARAMULUM or Gayandi, regarded as an intermediary between Baiame and humankind....
Goddess name
"CIPACTLI (great earth mother)"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Primordial goddess. Not strictly a goddess, but significant enough in Aztec cosmogony to be included here. According to tradition she was created in the form of a huge alligator-like monster by the underworld deities MICTLANTECUHLTI and MICTECACIHUATL. She may equate with TLALTECUHTLI, the toad-like earth monster torn apart to form heaven and earth. According to one tradition she emerged from the primordial waters and engaged in a fierce struggle with the Sun god TEZCATLIPOCA during which he tore off her lower jaw to prevent her sinking back into the depths and she bit off his right foot. The mountains are said to be the scaly ridges of her skin....
Goddess name
"Cipactli"
Aztec / Mexico A primordial goddess of water
Goddess name
"Danu"
Hindu Primordial goddess Hindu / Vedic
Goddess name
"Hani-Yasu-Hiko"
Shinto / Japan God of potters. The consort of HANI-YASU-HIME, he is one of the clay deities made from the faeces of the primordial goddess IZANAMI....
Goddess name
"Hani-Yasu-Hime"
Shinto / Japan Goddess of potters. The consort of HANI-YASU-HIKO, she is one of the clay deities made from the faeces of the primordial goddess IZANAMI....
Goddess name
"Hariti"
Buddhist Goddess for the protection of children, easy delivery, happy child rearing and parenting, harmony between husband and wife, love, and the well-being and safety of the family. Women without children also pray to Kishimojin to help them become pregnant. Originally, Hariti was a cannibalistic demon. She had hundreds of children whom she loved and doted upon, but to feed them, she abducted and killed the children of others. Buddhist
Goddess name
"Hauhet"
Egypt Primordial goddess, one of the Ogboad Egypt
Goddess name
"Hauhet"
Egypt Primordial goddess. One of the eight deities of the OGDOAD, representing chaos, she is coupled with the god HEH and appears in anthropomorphic form but with the head of a snake. The pair epitomize the concept of infinity. She is also depicted greeting the rising Sun in the guise of a baboon....
Goddess name
"Haumea"
Hawaiian Mother goddess. ] She is the daughter of PAPATUANUKU, the primordial earth mother, and is revered by many people of Polynesia and by the Maori of New Zealand. Her more notable children include PELE, the volcano goddess of Hawaii, and HI'AIKA, the goddess of the dance. As a deity responsible for birth, Haumea possesses a magical wand that she used at the time of creation to engender fruit trees and fish. From time to time she uses it to replenish stocks. Mythology also identifies her as a heroine who saved herself and her consort from enemies at the time of creation by hiding in a breadfruit tree and fending off the attackers with poisonous sap and wood splinters....
Goddess name
"Hehet"
Egypt Primordial goddess of the immeasurable Egypt
Goddess name
"Hi'aika"
Hawaiian Goddess. The daughter of HAUMEA and younger sister of PELE, the volcano goddess, Hi'aika is the mistress of the dance and especially of the hula. Separate traditions identify her with LAKA, the god of the hula and the son of KANE, the god of light; and with a goddess, Na Wahine, the daughter of the primordial creator principle KEAWE. The hula was designed to give a formalized structure to the enactment of myths and among the favorite topics is the romance between Pele and the hero Lohiau. According to mythology Hi'aika was entrusted with a mission to find Lohiau on Pele's behalf and to bring him back to her, a mission that subsequently enflamed the jealousy of Pele over her sister's developing relationship with Lohiau, and brought about his death in Pele's fiery lava....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.