8 ways to attend college for free
GodFinder
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z




List of Gods : "Goddess Oba" - 61 records

1 2 3 4
Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"AEGIR (water)"
Icelandic / Nordic God of the ocean. A lesser known AESIR god of Asgard concerned with the moods of the sea and their implications for mariners. The river Eider was known to the Vikings as “Aegir's Door.” Aegir is also depicted in some poetry as the “ale brewer,” perhaps an allusion to the caldrons of mead which were thought to come from under the sea (see also the Celtic deities DAGDA and GOBNIU). There are references in literature to Saxons sacrificing captives, probably to Aegir, before setting sail for home. Linked in uncertain manner to the goddess RAN he was believed to have sired nine children, the waves of the sea, who were possibly giantesses....
Goddess name
"Abnoba"
Celtic Goddess of the hunt, similar to the Roman Diana. Celtic
Goddess name
"Abnoba"
Roman / Celtic / European Forest and river goddess. Known locally from the Black Forest region of Germany. The name “Avon,” åśśociated with many rivers, derives from her name....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Adrastea"
Hellenized Phrygian / northwestern Turkey mountain goddess. Probably derived from a local...
Goddess name
"Akewa"
Toba Sun and war goddess Toba
Goddess name
"Andarta"
Celtic / Gallic Fertility goddess (probable). Patron goddess of the Vocontii tribe. Her name seems to have derived either from artos (bear) or ar (ploughed land).See also ANDRASTA....
Goddess name
"Arinna (sun goddess)"
Hittite / Hurrian Solar deity. May have taken androgynous form, but also identified as the consort of the weather god TESUB. Probably the head of the Hittite state pantheon. There is little detail because the religious center of Arinna is knownonly from texts. The Sun goddess was also perceived to be a paramount chthonic or earth goddess. She becomes largely syncretized with the Hurrian goddess HEBAT....
Goddess name
"Asnan"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian vegetation goddess. Minor deity probably known to the Sumerians from circa 3500BC or earlier. She is concerned with the abundance of grain in the fields, sent as its protectress by the gods ENLIL and ENKI. According to creation accounts, she and the cattle god LAHAR were first intended to serve the needs of the Annunaki, the celestial children of AN, but when the heavenly creatures were found unable to make use of their products, humankind was created to provide an outlet for their services. Attributes: ears of corn sprouting from her shoulders....
Goddess name
"As”palis"
Western Semitic Hunting goddess. There is scant mention of As”palis from Melite in Phthia and she is probably a local version of ARTEMIS. As in certain Artemis mythology, she hanged herself and her body disappeared....
Goddess name
"As”ratum"
Western Semitic / Canaanite Fertility goddess. Probably a corruption of the Semitic ATHIRAT or ASERAH. Also mentioned in Babylonian texts from the Hellenistic period. Also As”rat (Akkadian)....
Goddess name
"Atete"
Kafa / Ethiopia, northeastern Africa Fertility goddess. She was åśśimilated into the Christian cult of the Virgin Mary, but is probably the subject of an ancient fertility rite performed by women who collect various sacred plants and throw them into the river. The festival is known as Astar yo Mariam (Epiphany of Mary)....
Goddess name
"Bat"
Egypt / Upper cow goddess of fertility. She was probably well known in the Old kingdom (circa 2700 BC onward). Associated principally with Upper Egypt, for a while she may have rivaled Hathor in Lower Egypt but by the time of the New kingdom (sixteenth century BC) her influence had waned. She may be represented on the Narmer Palette (Cairo Museum) which com memorates the unification of the two kingdoms. Bat is only rarely found in large sculptures and paintings, but is often the subject of Egyptian period jewelry, including amulets and ritual sistrum rattles. Depicted as a cow or anthropo morphically with bovine ears and horns. Also Bata....
Goddess name
"Belet-Ili (lady of tbe gods)"
Mesopotamian / BabylonianAkkadian Mother goddess. Known in Babylon and probably modeled on NINHURSAG A....
Goddess name
"Bellona"
Greek The goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. Greek
Goddess name
"Bellona"
Roman Goddess of war and mother goddess Roman the goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. She is frequently mentioned by the Roman poets as the companion of Mars, or even as his sister or his wife. Virgil describes her as armed with a bloody scourge. (The Aeneid Book VIII)
Goddess name
"Cailleach Bheur"
Celtic / Scottish Goddess of Winter. Depicted as a blue-faced hag who is reborn on October 31 (Samhain). She brings the snow until the goddess BRIGIT deposes her and she eventually turns to stone on April 30 (Beltine). In later times the mythical, witch-like figure of “Black Annis” probably derived from her....
Goddess name
"Cathubodua"
Celtic / Continental / European war goddess. Known only from inscriptions and probably comparable with the Irish Celtic Badb Catha.See also MORRIGAN....
Goddess name
"Dzivaguru"
Korekore / Shona / northern Zimbabwe, southern Africa Chthonic mother goddess. Originally said to have ruled both heaven and earth and lived in a palace by a sacred lake near Dande. She is depicted wearing goatskins and bearing a cornucopia holding magical substances. Her sacred creatures are mythical golden Sunbirds, probably modeled on swallows, a pair of which were actually discovered in Zimbabwe....
Goddess name
"Eostre"
Anglo - Saxon Fertility goddess of spring. The derivation of “Easter.” Probably a number of the obscure folk customs surrounding Easter and still practiced in England trace back to her worship....
Goddess name
"Estsanatlehi (woman that changes)"
Navaho / USA Fertility goddess. Probably regarded as the most powerful deity in the Navaho pantheon, she has powers of endless self-rejuvenation. According to tradition, she was created from a small turquoise image into which life was infused through a ritual of the great gods and she is the sister of the goddess YOLKAI ESTAN. She is also the consort of the Sun god TSOHANOAI and the mother of the war god NAYENEZGANI. She is said to live in the west and is benevolent in nature, sending the gentle Rains of summer and the warm thawing winds of spring....
1 2 3 4

8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.