8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Goddess Pare" - 27 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Abeona"
Roman A goddess who protected children the first time they left their parents' home, safeguarding their first steps alone. She is related to Adeona, a goddess who guided children back to their parents' home. Roman
Goddess name
"Anat"
Hebrew / Israel The goddess ‘Anat is never mentioned in Hebrew scriptures as a goddess, though her name is apparently preserved in the city names Beth Anath and Anathoth. Anathoth seems to be a plural form of the name, perhaps a shortening of bêt ‘anatôt 'House of the ‘Anats', either a reference to many shrines of the goddess or a plural of intensification. The ancient hero Shamgar son of ‘Anat is mentioned in Judges 3.31;5:6 which raises the idea that this hero may have been imagined as a demi-god, a mortal son of the goddess.
Goddess name
"Antu aka Antum"
Babylon / Akkadia A goddess, the first consort of Anu. They were the parents of the Anunnaki and the Utukki. Antu was replaced as consort by Ishtar or Inanna, who may also be a daughter of Anu and Antu. She is similar to Anat. Babylon / Akkadia
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Aveta"
Roman / Celtic / Gallic Goddess of birth and midwifery. Known mainly from clay figurines found at Toulon-sur-Allier, France. The models show the goddess with infants at the breast and apparently she is concerned especially with nursing mothers. The figure is often accompanied by a small lapdog....
Goddess name
"Belisama"
Gaul Goddess connected with lakes and rivers, fire, crafts and light. Identified with Minerva / Athena and has been compared with Brigid. Gaul
Goddess name
"Ceridwen"
Celtic / Welsh Goddess of inspiration. Depicted as the hag-aspect of the mother goddess, she is the consort of TEGID FOEL. Her children are Creirwy (daughter) and Afagddu (son). She allegedly prepares the caldron of knowledge....
Goddess name
"Dhrti"
Jain Minor goddess who apparently just hangs around Jain
Goddess name
"Eabani"
Armenian The companion of Gilgamesh, the first primaeval man who was turning his rugged face towards civilization through the love of a woman. He takes part in the wanderings of Gilgamesh, and fights with him against Ishtar and the heavenly bull sent by Anu to avenge the insulted goddess. Apparently wounded in this struggle Eabani dies. Armenian Mythology
Goddess name
"Eurynome"
Greek Sea goddess. The daughter of Nisos and mother of the Graces. Also the mother of Bellepheron, fathered by POSEIDON, though she is accounted as the consort of GLAUKOS. Little else is known, but her cult center was apparently at Phigaleia (Arcadia)....
Goddess name
"Gul-ses/ Gul-ases"
Hittite These goddesses apparently are the scribes of the gods that dispense good, evil, life & death
Goddess name
"Hadad"
Western Semitic / Syrian / Phoenician weather god. Derived from the Akkadian deity ADAD. In texts found at the site of the ancient Canaanite capital of Ugarit [Ras Samra] , the name of Hadad apparently becomes a substitute for that of BAAL. His voice is described as roaring from the clouds and his weapon is the thunderbolt. His mother is the goddess ASERAH. During Hellenic times he was predominantly worshiped at Ptolemais and Hierapolis. His Syrian consort is ATARGATIS, who overshadowed him in local popularity at Hierapolis. Statues of the two deities were carried in procession to the sea twice yearly. According to the Jewish writer Josephus, Hadad also enjoyed a major cult following at Damascus in the eighth and ninth centuries BC. By the third century BC the Hadad-Atargatis cult had extended to Egypt, when he becomes identified as the god SUTEKH. In the Greek tradition his consort becomes HERA.See also ADAD....
Goddess name
"Hariti"
Buddhist Goddess for the protection of children, easy delivery, happy child rearing and parenting, harmony between husband and wife, love, and the well-being and safety of the family. Women without children also pray to Kishimojin to help them become pregnant. Originally, Hariti was a cannibalistic demon. She had hundreds of children whom she loved and doted upon, but to feed them, she abducted and killed the children of others. Buddhist
Goddess name
"Heret-Kau"
Egypt / Lower underworld goddess. Very little is known of Heret-Kau. She was recognized chiefly in the Old kingdom (27th to 22nd centuries BC), apparently concerned with guardianship of the deceased in the afterlife and sometimes appearing as a figurine in attendance on ISIS in building foundations....
Goddess name
"Horae"
Greek Horai, originally the personifications or goddesses of the order of nature and of the seasons, but in later times they were regarded as the goddesses of order in general and of justice. In Homer, who neither mentions their parents nor their number, they are the Olympian divinities of the weather and the ministers of Zeus; and in this capacity they guard the doors of Olympus, and promote the fertility of the earth, by the various kinds of weather they send down. Greek
Goddess name
"Isi"
India Goddess moderating the whole world, giving laws to heaven, earth, and Ocean, as the common parent both of gods and men, and as the productive cause both of corn and trees. India
Goddess name
"Keawe"
Hawaiian Creator god. An androgynous though apparently male principle or monad, he lived once in the dark empty abyss of Po. There, Keawe transformed primordial chaos into an orderly cosmos. He fashioned the sky from the lid of his calabash (a water-carrying gourd) and the Sun from an orange disc formerly kept inside the calabash. Keawe's first son was KANE, the god of light, and his daughter was Na Wahine, both created through his own powers of conception. He subsequently entered into an incestuous relationship with Na Wahine to father the chief pantheon of Hawaiian gods and goddesses, including most notably KU, LONO and Kanaloa, who became known, collectively, as the tripartite god....
Goddess name
"NA CHA (here is a loud cry)"
Taoist / Chinese Guardian god. A somewhat ambiguous god who is generally regarded as benevolent, but whose traditions hint at a more destructive aspect. He was born a god of human parents, the reincarnation of an older deity, Ling Chu-Tzu, the “intelligent pearl.” According to tradition, his father was Li Ching, who threatened to kill his mother because she claimed she was made pregnant by the mystical actions of a Taoist priest who told her she was to bear the child of a unicorn. Na Cha is said to have fought in the Shang-Chou war on the side of the Chou dynasty circa 1027 BC. His chief adversary was the sea dragon king. Ultimately he became involved with the goddess Shih-Chi Niang Niang, accidentally killed her attendant and, in remorse, committed suicide....
Goddess name
"NINURTA (lord plough)"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian / Iraq God of thunderstorms and the plough. Ninurta is the Sumerian god of farmers and is identified with the plough. He is also the god of thunder and the hero of the Sumerian pantheon, closely linked with the confrontation battles between forces of good and evil that characterize much of Mesopotamian literature. He is one of several challengers of the malignant dragon or serpent Kur said to inhabit the empty space between the earth's crust and the primeval sea beneath. Ninurta is the son of Enlil and Ninhursaga a, alternatively Ninlil, and is the consort of Gula, goddess of healing. He is attributed with the creation of the mountains which he is said to have built from giant stones with which he had fought against the demon Asag. He wears the horned helmet and tiered skirt and carries a weapon Sarur which becomes personified in the texts, having its own intelligence and being the chief adversary, in the hands of Ninurta, of Kur. He carries the double-edged scimitar-mace embellished with lions' heads and, according to some authors, is depicted in nonhuman form as the thunderbird lmdugud (sling stone), which bears the head of a lion and may represent the hailstones of the god. His sanctuary is the E-padun-tila. Ninurta is perceived as a youthful warrior and probably equates with the Babylonian heroic god Marduk. His cult involved a journey to Eridu from both Nippur and Girsu. He may be compared with Is”kur, who was worshiped primarily by herdsmen as a storm god....
Goddess name
"Ninigi (Prince)"
Shinto / Japan Ancestral god. The deity who, according to tradition, is the heir apparent of the Sun goddess Amaterasu. He was sent to earth from heaven to rule at the behest of the gods. His parents are Taka-Mi-Musubi and Ame-No-OshiHo-Mimi and he takes the title of “divine grandchild.” He is the ancestral deity of the imperial dynasties....
Goddess name
"Ogmius ( Ogma, Ogmios )"
Celtic / Irish God of poetry and speech. Very little is known of him, but the Roman writer Lucian mentions a Romano-Celtic god of wisdom, Ogmios, apparently åśśimilated with HERCULES and described as an old man with lion's skin holding a crowd of people chained to his tongue by their ears. NOTE: a goddess Ogma is also mentioned; she may have been a mother goddess in the original Irish pantheon....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.