8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Goddess Acco" - 118 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Nintu"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian Mother goddess. According to legend she pinched off fourteen pieces of primordial clay which she formed into womb deities, seven on the left and seven on the right with a brick between them, who produced the first seven pairs of human embryos. She is closely identified with the goddess Ninhursaga a and may have become Belet Ili (mistress of the gods) when, at Enki's suggestion, the gods slew one among themselves and used his blood and flesh, mixed with clay, to create mankind....
Goddess name
"Nyavirezi"
Rwanda / central Africa Lion goddess. According to legend she was originally a mortal daughter of the tribal chief. While walking, she was trans formed into a lioness. Though returning to human form, she occasionally became leonine again and, in this guise, slew at least one husband who discovered her secret....
Supreme god name
"Oduduwa"
Yoruba / Nigeria, West Africa Creator goddess. The consort, or alternatively the daughter, of the supreme god OLODUMARE. She is perceived as the substance, or matrix, of the earth which Olodumare impregnated to generate life. She is also a goddess of war and her sons include the great heroic Yoruba god OGUN. According to some traditions Oduduwa is also perceived as a god....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Onuris [Greek]"
Egypt God of hunting and war. Onuris is first known from This, near Abydos in Upper Egypt. In later times his main cult center was at Samannud in the Nile delta. His consort is the lion goddess Mekhit. Onuris is generally depicted in human form as a bearded figure wearing a crown with four plumes and wielding a spear or occasionally holding a rope. He is sometimes accompanied by Mekhit in iconography. Seen as a hunter who caught and slew the enemies of RE, the Egyptian Sun god, some legends place him close to the battle between HORUS and SETH. In clåśśical times, Onuris became largely syncretized with the Greek war god ARES. Also Anhuret (Egyptian)....
Goddess name
"Papatuanuku"
Polynesian / including Maori Chthonic mother goddess. According to tradition she evolved spontaneously in the cosmic night personified by TE PO and became the apotheosis of papa, the earth. In other traditions she was engendered, with the sky god RANGINUI, by a primordial androgynous being, ATEA. Paptuanuku and Ranginui are regarded as the primal parents of the pantheon who, through a prolonged period of intercourse, produced at least ten major deities as their children. In Maori culture Papatuanuku, like all deities, is represented only by inconspicuous, slightly worked stones or pieces of wood and not by the large totems, which are depictions of ancestors....
Goddess name
"Pattinidevi (queen of goddesses)"
Hindu / Singhalese / Sri Lanka Mother goddess. A deification of Kannaki, the consort of Kovolan who, according to ancient Tamil tradition, journeyed to the town of Madurai to sell a gold anklet. Through trickery she was convicted of theft and executed, but was canonized. According to another tradition, she was born from a mango pierced by a sacred arrow. In southern India and Sri Lanka a goddess of chastity and fidelity in marriage. Also a guardian against diseases, including measles and smallpox. She is åśśociated with fire-walking rituals. Attributes: cobra-hood behind the head, and a lotus....
Goddess name
"Pele"
Polynesian / Hawaii Volcano goddess. According to tradition she arrived in Hawaii in a canoe, having sailed from Tahiti. She may derive locally from the more familiar Polynesian moon goddess, HINA, since one of her alternative names is Hina-Ai-Malama (Hina who devours the moon)....
Goddess name
"Qamai'ts"
Bella Coola Indian / British Columbia, Canada Creator goddess. Said to live in the upper heaven, Atsa'axl, from where she controls the earth. According to tradition the mountains were once malevolent beings who made the world uninhabitable, until she conquered them and reduced them in size. She is never invoked or prayed to. Also Tsi Sisnaaxil (our woman); Ek Yakimtolsil (afraid of nothing)....
Goddess name
"Rhea"
Greek Pefa, Pea, Pefy, or Pe. The name as well as the nature of this divinity is one of the most difficult points in ancient mythology. Some consider 'Pea' to be merely another form of pa, the earth, while others connect it with pew, I flow; but thus much seems undeniable, that Rhea, like Demeter, was a goddess of the earth. According to the Hesiodic Theogony, Rhea was a daughter of Uråñuś and Ge, and accordingly a sister of Oceåñuś, Coeus, Hyperion, Crius, lapetus, Theia, Themis, and Mnemosyne. Greek
Goddess name
"Ruamoko"
Polynesian / Maori God of volcanoes and earthquakes. According to tradition, Ruamoko is the youngest son of RANGINUI and PAPATUANUXU and is possessed by a formidable temper. When his older siblings set about separating the prime parents from their eternal lovemaking in order to allow light into the space between sky and earth, he was enraged and his boisterous tantrum became revealed in the violence of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Ruamoko is of less importance than PELE, the chief volcano goddess of Polynesia, who is revered mainly in Hawaii....
Goddess name
"Salus"
Greek The personification of health, prosperity, and the public welfare, among the Romans. In the first of these three senses she answers very closely to the Greek Hygieia, and was accordingly represented in works of art with the same attributes as the Greek goddess. In the second sense she represents prosperity in general and was invoked by the husbandmen at seed-time. In the third sense Salus is the goddess of the public welfare.
Goddess name
"Sarama (the nimble one)"
Hindu / Vedic, Epic / Puranic Attendant goddess. She acts as a messenger to the god INDRA and guards his herds. In later Hindu texts Sarama is reputedly the mother of all dogs and is given the epithet the “bitch of heaven.” The Rg Veda accounts her as having punished the minor deity Panis for stealing cows....
Goddess name
"Saranyu (the fleet one)"
Hindu / Vedic Primordial goddess of uncertain affinities. Saranyu is the daughter of the god TVASTAR, and the sister of VISVARUPA. Her consort is Vivasvat, by whom she is said to be the mother of YAMA and YAMI, the twin progenitors of the human race. Little else is known of her, but she is accounted as having an impetuous nature.See also VIVASVAN....
Goddess name
"Saus”ka"
Hittite / Hurrian Fertility goddess. Of Hurrian origin, Saus”ka was adopted by the Hittite state religion. She is also identified with war and is particularly renowned as a goddess of healing. She is depicted in human form with wings, standing with a lion and accompanied by two attendants. Saus”ka is known in detail only because she became the patron goddess of the Hittite king Hattusilis II (1420-1400 BC)....
Goddess name
"Selene"
Greek Also called Mene, a female divinity presiding over the months, or Latin Luna, was the goddess of the moon, or the moon personified into a Divine being. She is called a daughter of Hyperion and Theia, and accordingly a sister of Helios and Eos (Theogony 371 ; Apollodorus; Argonautica) ; but others speak of her as a daughter of Hyperion by Euryphaessa, or of Pallas, or of Zeus and Latona, or lastly of Helios. Greek
Goddess name
"Selene (radiant)"
Greek moon goddess. The daughter of HYPERION (a TITAN) and sister of the Sun god HELIOS. The tutelary deity of magicians, she rides in a chariot drawn by two horses. According to legend she fell in love with the sleeping Endymion. She becomes largely syncretized with HEKATE and in Roman culture equates with the goddess LUNA....
Goddess name
"Semele (earth)"
Greco - Roman but probably of Thracian or Phrygian origin Mother goddess. According to legend she was the mortal daughter of Cadmos and became the mother of the god DIONYSOS (BACCHUS) after a brief liaison with ZEUS (JUPITER), also in mortal guise. Semele was burned to death on Olympus, unable to withstand the presence of Zeus in godly form, but was subsequently deified by him....
Goddess name
"Si n"
Nordic / Icelandic Goddess. The consort of LOKI and listed among the AESIR goddesses. Her son is Nari or Narfi. According to tradition, SKADI, the consort of NJORD, set a poisonous snake to drip poison on to a captive Loki but Sigyn collected most of the venom in a bowl and threw it away....
Goddess name
"Siddhi (accomplishment, success)"
Hindu / Epic / Puranic Minor goddess of good fortune. A deity who grants favors. Sometimes åśśociated with the elephant god GANESA or MAHA-GANAPATI, on whose knee she may sit. In earlier times she was described as a consort of BHAGA....
Goddess name
"Sif"
Nordic / Icelandic / / Germanic corn goddess. The consort of THOR. She is mentioned in the Eddaic Lay of Lokasenna and in the Lay of Har barth. According to Snorri Sturluson she was originally a prophetess called Sibyl. She possesses great beauty and has long golden hair. Her sons are ULL and Loridi. According to tradition, LOKI cut off Sif's hair in mischief, but when confronted and threatened by Thor, he had the dwarfs make her a magical hairpiece of pure gold which, when it touched her head, became a living part of her and grew....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.