8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Goddess Oba" - 61 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Fortuna"
Roman Goddess of good fortune. A deity who particularly appealed to women, partly in an oracular context. She is depicted carrying a globe, rudder and cornucopiae. She probably evolved from the model of the Greek goddess TYCHE. Her main symbol is the wheel of fate which she may stand upon and Renaissance artists tended to depict her thus. Among her more celebrated sanctuaries in Rome, the temple of Fortuna Redux was built by Domitian to celebrate his victories in Germany. She is depicted in a well-known stone carving in Gloucester Museum, England, holding her three main attributes....
Goddess name
"Gad"
Western Semitic / Punic / Carthaginian God of uncertain status. Probably concerned with chance or fortune and known from Palmyrene inscriptions, and from the Vetus Testamentum in place names such as Baal-Gad and Midal-Gad. Popular across a wide area of Syrio-Palestine and Anatolia in preBiblical times. Thought to have been syncretized ultimately with the Greek goddess TYCHE....
Goddess name
"Hala"
Kassite / Iraq Goddess of healing. Probably later syncretized with the Akkadian goddess GULA....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Hayasya"
Hindu (1) horse god. Probably identical with Hayagriva.(2) horse goddess. Buddhist. Attribute: the head of a horse....
Goddess name
"Hina"
Polynesian / Tahiti moon goddess. In local traditions the daughter of the god TANGAROA and creatrix of the moon, which she governs. She lives in one of its dark spots representing groves of trees which she brought from earth in a canoe and planted. She is also represented as the consort of Tangaroa. Hina probably evolved in Tahiti from the Polynesian underworld goddess HINE-NUITE-PO. Also SINA (Samoa); Ina (Hervey Islands)....
Goddess name
"Inana, Istar,Ishtar"
Akkadian / Sumerian The most important of all Mesopotamian goddesses, and a multi-faceted personality, occurring in cuneiform texts of all periods. The Sumerian name probably means "Lady of heaven";, and the Akkadian name Ishtar is related to the Syrian Astarte and the biblical Ashtaroth is usually considered as a daughter of Anzu, with her cult located in Uruk, but there are other traditions as to her ancestry, and it is probable that these reflect originally different goddesses that were identified with her. Ishtar is the subiect of a cycle of texts describing her love affair and ultimately fatal relationship with Tammuz.
Goddess name
"Khandsba"
Hindu / late Form of the god SI IVA. Khandoba is believed to have emerged as a deity with a distinct cultic following no earlier than the thirteenth or fourteenth century, mainly in western India and centered on Jejuri, near Poona. The god is generally regarded as one of several martial forms which SI iva took to combat demons. His consort is the goddess MHALSA, considered to be a form of PARVATI. He is depicted bearing four arms and is usually mounted on a horse, but may also be accompanied by a dog. Attributes: bowl, drum, sword and trident. Also Makhari; Mallari; Martland....
Goddess name
"Kuan Yin"
China Benign guardian goddess, probably of India origin China / Taoist
Goddess name
"Leiwani"
Hittite / Hurrian Chthonic underworld goddess. Associated with charnel houses and probably modeled on the Sumerian ERES KIGAL....
Goddess name
"Maat"
Egypt Minor goddess of cosmic order. Epitomizing the harmonious laws of the cosmic order. She is recognized from the middle of the third millennium, and probably earlier, closely åśśociated with the creator deities and particularly the Sun god. In later times she was described as the “daughter of Re.” Her only known sanctuary is in the complex of Karnak at Thebes. Maat is depicted either in human form wearing an ostrich plume on her head or by an ostrich feather alone. The rulers of Egypt believed that they governed under her aegis and frequently had themselves described as “beloved of Maat.” Maat was also integral to the success of a soul påśśing through the Hall of the Two Truths, where the heart was weighed, to reach Paradise....
Goddess name
"Mama Qoca (mother sea)"
Inca / pre - Columbian South America / Peru, etc Goddess of the ocean. Originally a pre-Inca goddess of coastal regions who retained her influence under Inca rule. Invoked by all Indians who gain their livelihood from the sea. Today probably syncretized largely with the Christian Virgin Mary. Also Mama Cocha....
Goddess name
"Mami"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian Mother goddess. Identified in the Atrahasis texts and other creation legends and probably synonymous with NINHURSAG A. She was involved in the creation of mankind from clay and blood. The name almost certainly came into use because it is the first word that a child formulates. Also Mama; Mammitum....
Goddess name
"Marcia Proba"
Britain A warrior queen goddess
Goddess name
"Marcia Proba"
British warrior queen goddess British
Goddess name
"Marcia Proba"
Celtic Goddess of justice Celtic
Goddess name
"Meter"
The essence of the great mother of all gods, equating most closely to GAIA Mother goddess, Greek. Known throughout the Greek Empire and generally the object of devotion by individuals rather than large cult followings. Also known as Meter oriae (mother of the mountain). Her popularity is thought to have spread from northern Ionia. Herodotus mentions a festival of Meter in Kyzikos. Probably derived originally from the western Asiatic great mother (see KYBELE)....
Goddess name
"Mhalsa"
Hindu / late Minor goddess. The consort of KHANDOBA and considered to be a form of the goddess PARVATI. Locally worshiped at Jejuri, near Poona in western India....
Goddess name
"N ssaba"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian Goddess of writing and wisdom. A daughter of AN and probably orig inally a vegetation deity. Her symbol is the inscribing stylus. She is a patron deity of Unug [Warka]....
Goddess name
"NINURTA (lord plough)"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian / Iraq God of thunderstorms and the plough. Ninurta is the Sumerian god of farmers and is identified with the plough. He is also the god of thunder and the hero of the Sumerian pantheon, closely linked with the confrontation battles between forces of good and evil that characterize much of Mesopotamian literature. He is one of several challengers of the malignant dragon or serpent Kur said to inhabit the empty space between the earth's crust and the primeval sea beneath. Ninurta is the son of Enlil and Ninhursaga a, alternatively Ninlil, and is the consort of Gula, goddess of healing. He is attributed with the creation of the mountains which he is said to have built from giant stones with which he had fought against the demon Asag. He wears the horned helmet and tiered skirt and carries a weapon Sarur which becomes personified in the texts, having its own intelligence and being the chief adversary, in the hands of Ninurta, of Kur. He carries the double-edged scimitar-mace embellished with lions' heads and, according to some authors, is depicted in nonhuman form as the thunderbird lmdugud (sling stone), which bears the head of a lion and may represent the hailstones of the god. His sanctuary is the E-padun-tila. Ninurta is perceived as a youthful warrior and probably equates with the Babylonian heroic god Marduk. His cult involved a journey to Eridu from both Nippur and Girsu. He may be compared with Is”kur, who was worshiped primarily by herdsmen as a storm god....
Goddess name
"Naenia"
Roman A dirge or lamentation such as was uttered at funerals, either by relatives of the deceased or by hired persons. At Rome Naenia was personified and worshipped as a goddess, who even had a chapel, which, however, as in the case of all other gods in connection with the dead, was outside the walls of the city, near the porta Viminalis. The object of this worship was probably to procure rest and peace for the departed in the lower world. Roman
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.