8 ways to attend college for free
GodFinder
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z




List of Gods : "Goddess Pre" - 224 records

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9   ...   12
Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Anapel"
Siberia / Koryak Little Grandmother Goddess who presides over birth and reincarnation Koryak
Goddess name
"Anat"
Hebrew / Israel The goddess ‘Anat is never mentioned in Hebrew scriptures as a goddess, though her name is apparently preserved in the city names Beth Anath and Anathoth. Anathoth seems to be a plural form of the name, perhaps a shortening of bêt ‘anatôt 'House of the ‘Anats', either a reference to many shrines of the goddess or a plural of intensification. The ancient hero Shamgar son of ‘Anat is mentioned in Judges 3.31;5:6 which raises the idea that this hero may have been imagined as a demi-god, a mortal son of the goddess.
Goddess name
"Anat / Athene"
Greek Anat and Athene In a Cyprian inscription the Greek goddess Athêna Sôteira Nikê is equated with ‘Anat. Anat is also presumably the goddess whom Sanchuniathon calls Athene, a daughter of El, mother unnamed, who with Hermes (that is Anubis) councelled El on the making of a sickle and a spear of iron, presumably to use against his father Uråñuś. However, in the Baal cycle, that rôle is åśśigned to Asherah / Elat and Anat is there called the "Virgin."
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Anat in Mesopotamia"
Akkadian In Akkadian the form one would expect ‘Anat to take would be Antu earlier Antum. This would also be the normal femanine form that would be taken by Anu, the Akkadian form of An 'Sky', the Sumerian god of heaven. Antu appears in Akkadian texts mostly as a rather colorless consort of Anu, the mother of Ishtar in the Gilgamesh story, but is also identified with the northwest Semitic goddess ‘Anat of essentially the same name. It is unknown whether this is an equation of two originally separate goddesses whose names happened to fall together or whether ‘Anat's cult spread to Mesopotamia where she came to be worshippped as Anu's spouse because the Mesopotamia form of her name suggested she was a counterpart to Anu.
Goddess name
"Antevorta"
Roman Goddess of childbirth, invoked by pregnant women, to avert the dangers of child-birth. Roman
Goddess name
"Apet"
Egypt Goddess who protects pregnant women, children, nursing mothers and justice. Egypt
Goddess name
"Arduinna"
Roman / Celtic / European Goddess of Forests and hunting. Known only from inscriptions and figurines in the Ardennes region. Depicted riding on the back of a wild boar and presumed to be a guardian deity of boars. Identified by the Romans with the goddess DIANA....
Goddess name
"Asase Yaa"
Ashanti / Ghana, West Africa Chthonic fertility goddess. A major deity revered over a wide area of Akanand Fante-speaking Ghana. She has no temples or priests but days (Thursdays) are set aside in her honor and no ploughing is permitted. By tradition a farmer sacrifices a çõçkerel to her each year to ensure a good harvest, sprinkling the blood on the ground. As the womb of the earth, she represents the goddess of the dead and she is also goddess of truth. Also Asase Efua (Fante)....
Goddess name
"Asase Yaa / Asase Efua"
Africa Chthonic fertility goddess. As the womb of the earth, she represents and is also goddess of truth. Ghana, West Africa
Goddess name
"Astlik"
Pre - Christian Armenian Astral goddess. Derived from the Mesopotamian model of ISTAR. Survived in Christian times as the mother of fairies....
Goddess name
"Atars'amain (morning star of heaven)"
Pre - Islamic northern / central Arabian Astral deity of uncertain gender. Worshiped particularly by the Is”amme tribe, but revered widely among other Arabs. Known from circa 800 BC and identified in letters of the Assyrian kings Es”arhaddon and Assurbanipal. May be synonymous with the Arab goddess ALLAT whose cult was centered on Palmyra....
Goddess name
"Athirat"
Western Semitic / Canaanite Fertility goddess. In Old Babylonian texts of Hammurabi she is identified as the daughter-in-law of the king of heaven. She is also known from pre-Islamic southern Arabia as a consort of the moon god AMM.See also ASERAH....
Goddess name
"Atropos"
Pre - Homeric Greek Goddess of fate. According to Hesiod, one of the daughters of ZEUS and THEMIS. One of an ancient trio of MOIRAI with LACHESIS and KLOTHO. She is responsible for the final part of a mortal life, the unturning inevitability of death, and she is depicted holding a pair of scales. The name of the plant Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade) derives from her....
Goddess name
"Auge"
Greek Princess of Arkadia and a priestess of Athena, who birthed her illegitimate son within the sacred precincts of the goddess. As punishment for the sacriligeous act, Athena made the land barren until the king had the girl exiled and sold into slavery. Greek
Goddess name
"BAAL (lord)"
Western Semitic / Canaanite / northern Israel, Lebanon / later Egypt vegetation deity and national god. Baal may have originated in pre-agricultural times as god of storms and Rain. He is the son of DAGAN and in turn is the father of seven storm gods, the Baalim of the Vetus Testamentum, and seven midwife goddesses, the SASURATUM. He is considered to have been worshiped from at least the nineteenth century BC. Later he became a vegetation god concerned with fertility of the land. From the mid-sixteenth century BC in the Egyptian New kingdom, Baal enjoyed a significant cult following, but the legend of his demise and restoration was never equated with that of OSIRIS. In the Greco-Roman period, Baal became åśśimilated in the Palestine region with ZEUS and JUPITER, but as a Punic deity [Carthage] he was allied with SATURNUS, the god of seed-sowing....
Supreme god name
"Bagisht"
Kafir / Afghanistan God of flood waters and prosperity. The son of the supreme goddess DISANI, conceived when she was raped from behind by an obscure demonic entity in the shape of a ram who violated her while she was milking cows by a lakeside. Bagisht is said to have been born in the current of the Prasun river whereupon the turbulent waters became smooth-flowing and parted to allow the infant to reach the bank. There seem to have been no elaborate sanctuaries but rather an abundance of simple shrines always placed close to water. The god was celebrated at the main festivals of the Kafir agricultural year and received sacrificial portions of meat. Also Opkulu....
Goddess name
"Bala-Sakti"
Dravidian / Tamil / southern India Goddess. Youthful deity who presides over six CAKRAS or prayer wheels. Often accompanied by a geometric magical diagram or yantra. Attributes: Book, hook, noose and rosary....
Goddess name
"Balarama (strength of Rama)"
Hindu / Epic / Puranic Incarnation of the god VIS'NU. May have originated in Vedic times as an agricultural fertility deity. He is the son of VASUDEVA and DEVAKI, though born from the womb of ROHINI. Jointly with KRSNA (his brother), he is identified as the eighth avatara (incarnation) of Vis'nu, or, with RAMA, as the seventh. Legend describes how Vis'nu impregnated the belly of the goddess Devaki with two hairs, one black, one white. To ensure their safety against a demon king, they were transferred before birth to Rohini. Krsna grew to be dark-skinned, and Balarama light. The latter enjoys similar characteristics to Krsna but fails to attract the same popularity. He is usually depicted on the right side of Krsna, rarely standing alone. The consort of Balarama is REVATI and his sons are Nisatha and Ulmuka. Epithets included Ananda (joy). In Jainism he is known as Baladeva. Attributes: arrow, club, drinking cup, fan palm, honey pot, lotus, pestle, pitcher, plough, prayer wheel, shield and sword....
Goddess name
"Baltis"
Pre - Islamic / Arabian Local goddess. Known from Carrhae in western Mesopotamia and identified as the apotheosis of the planet Venus....
Goddess name
"Banbha Cavillaca"
Peru A virgin goddess that was preggers by a sneaky god
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9   ...   12

8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.