8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Greek" - 1801 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Apollo"
Greek God of hunting and healing. One of the great divinities of the Greeks, was, according to Homer, the son of Zeus and Leto. Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod 918) states the same, and adds, that Apollo's sister was Artemis. Neither of the two poets suggests anything in regard to the birth-place of the god, unless we take "born in Lycia," which, however, according to others, would only mean "born of or in light." Apollo is one of the few Greek gods who did not sleep with Aphrodite
King name
"Apollyon"
Greek king of the bottomless pit. Greek
Ghost name
"Apparition"
Greek A ghost.
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Apulu Later Aplu"
Etruscan Sun god, often depicted in art with a staff and laurel branches. He was clearly derived from the Greek god Apollo. Etruscan
Goddess name
"Arachne"
Greek A Lydian maiden who challenged Athena to a weaving contest. Arachne produced a piece of cloth as and Athena could find no fault with it, she tore the work to pieces, and Arachne in despair hung herself. The goddess loosened the rope and saved her life, but the rope was changed into a cobweb and Arachne herself into a spider, the animal most odious to Athena. Greek

"Araethyrea"
Greek A daughter of Aras, an autochthon who was believed to have built Arantea, the most ancient town in Phliasia. She had a brother called Aoris, and is said to have been fond of the chase and warlike pursuits. When she died, her brother called the country of Phliasia after her Araethyrea.
God name
"Aray"
Pre - Christian Armenian war god. Probably derived locally from the Greek ARES. Some traditions suggests that he was also a dying-andrising god....

"Arcas"
Greek A son of Zeus by Callisto, a companion of Artemis.
God name
"Archangels"
Greek Carry Divine Decrees from God to humanity and are constantly in battle with the Son of darkness.

"Ardalus"
Greek A son of Hephaestus who was said to have invented the flute, and to have built a sanctuary of the Muses at Troeze who derived from him the surname Ardalides Ardaliotides
God name
"Areimanios"
Greek Chthonic underworld god. Probably derived from the Persian deity AHRIMAN. Plutarch identifies him as the embodiment of HADES....
King name
"Areithous"
Greek king of Arne in Ioeotia, and husband of Philomedusa, is called in the Iliad vii the club, because he fought with no other weapon but a club. He fell by the hand of the Arcadian Lycurgus, who drove him into a narrow defile, where he could not make use of his club.
Goddess name
"Ares"
Greek God of storms and war. Ares is a lesser known member of the Olympic pantheon of great gods, the son of ZEUS and HERA, who allegedly lived in Thrace. As a warrior god he is contrasted with the more prominent and successful goddess ATHENA who fought and vanquished him in a war between the gods. Although Athena stands for victory in battle through glory and honor, Ares epitomizes the evil and more brutal aspects of warfare. In the eyes of Zeus he is “the most hateful of gods.”
God name
"Ares"
Greek The god of war and one of the great Olympian gods of the Greeks. He is represented as the son of Zeus and Hera. A later tradition, according to which Hera conceived Ares by touching a certain flower, appears to be an imitation of the legend about the birth of Hephaestus, and is related by Ovid.

"Arestor"
Greek The father of Argus Panoptes, the guardian of Io, who is therefore called Arestorides. Greek
King name
"Arete"
Greek The wife of Alcinous, king of the Phaeacians. In the Odyssey she appears as a noble and active superintendent of the household of her husband, and when Odysseus arrived in the island, he first applied to queen Arete to obtain hospitable reception and protection. Respecting her connexion with the story of Jason and Medeia.
King name
"Arete"
Greek The wife of Alcinous, king of the Phaeacians. In the Odyssey she appears as a noble and active superintendent of the household of her husband, and when Odysseus arrived in the island, he first applied to queen Arete to obtain hospitable reception and protection. Respecting her connexion with the story of Jason and Medeia, see Alcinous. Greek
Nymph name
"Arethusa"
Greek One of the Nereid, and the nymph of the famous well, thus in the island of Ortygia near Syracuse. Alpheius reckons her among the Sicilian nymphs, and as the divinity who inspired pastoral poetry.
Book name
"Aretus"
Greek Two mythical personages of this name are mentioned in Homer's Iliad, Book XVII and The Odyssey, Book iii. 413.) and Apollodorus Library Book 3
King name
"Argades"
Greek A son of Ion, a king of Athens between the reigns of Erechtheus and Cecrops
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.