8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Greek" - 1801 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
God name
"Imhotep"
Egypt The first architect and physician known by name in written history. Two thousand years after his death, his status was raised to that of a god. He became the god of Medicine and healing. He was linked to Asclepius by the Greeks. Egypt
Spirit name
"Kneph"
Egypt Was originally the breath of life, his name meaning soul-breath. Indeed, according to Plutarch and Diodorus, kneph was identical with the Greek pneuma. Kneph in this context was a spirit that breathed life into things, giving them form. Egypt Kneph eventually became considered to be the creator god himself, in Elephantine, although his identity was finally åśśimilated into the more important god Amun.
God name
"Harendotes [Greek]"
Egypt Form of the god HORUS. Under this name, Horus specifically guards and protects his father OSIRIS in death. He thus becomes åśśociated with sarcophagi and appears frequently in coffin texts. Also Har-nedj-itef (Egyptian)....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Harmachis [Greek]"
Egypt Form of the god HORUS. Harmachis is Horus as the Sun god. Inscriptions from the New kingdom (circa 1550-1000 BC) identify the sphinx at Giza as Harmachis looking toward the eastern horizon. Also Har-em-akhet (Egyptian)....
God name
"Haroeris [Greek]"
Egypt Form of the god HORUS as a man. The name distinguishes the mature deity from HARPOKRATES, the child Horus. In this form he avenges his father, OSIRIS, and regains his kingdom from SETH, his uncle. He is depicted as the falcon god. Also Harueris; Har-wer (both Egyptian); HARENDOTES....
Goddess name
"Harpokrates [Greek]"
Egypt Form of the god HORUS as a child. Generally depicted sitting on the knee of his mother, the goddess ISIS, often suckling at the left breast and wearing the juvenile side-lock of hair. He may also be invoked to ward off dangerous creatures and is åśśociated with crocodiles, snakes and scorpions. He is generally representative of the notion of a god-child, completing the union of two deities. Also Har-pa-khered (Egyptian)....
God name
"Harsomtus [Greek]"
Egypt Form of the god HORUS. In this form Horus unites the northern and southern kingdoms of Egypt. He is depicted as a child comparable with HARPOKRATES. At the Edfu temple, he is identified thus as the offspring of Horus the elder and HATHOR. Also Har-mau (Egyptian)....
Goddess name
"Hours"
Egypt underworld goddesses. The twelve daughters of the Sun god RE. They act in concert against the adversaries of Re and control the destiny of human beings in terms of each person's life span, reflecting the supremacy of order and time over chaos. The Hours are sometimes represented on the walls of royal tombs in anthropomorphic form with a five-pointed star above the head. Also Horae (Greek)....
God name
"Mahes"
Egypt Sun god. An ancient deity worshiped chiefly in the region of the Nile delta and representing the destructive power of the Sun's heat. Depicted in the form of a lion. Also Miysis (Greek)....
Goddess name
"Mihos"
Egypt Lion god. The son of the goddess BASTET. Depicted in leonine form and originating from a cult center at Leontopolis [Tell el'Muqdam] in Lower Egypt. A sanctuary in his honor was built at Bubastis. Also Miysis (Greek)....
God name
"Montu"
Egypt Local god of war. Worshiped in and around the district of Thebes in Upper Egypt. He is known from circa 2000 BC and possibly earlier, but came to special prominence overseeing the aggressive posture of Theban kings from the XI to XVIII Dynasty (2133-1320 BC). Montu is depicted in human form but with a falcon's head surmounted by twin plumes, a Sun disc and the uraeus (cobra). At some stage, probably as Month (Greek), he became identified with a sacred bull, Buchis....
Goddess name
"Nephthys [Greek]"
Egypt Funerary goddess. Nephthys is the younger sister of ISIS, OSIRIS and SETH, who are the offspring of the chthonic god GEB and the sky goddess NUT in the Ennead genealogy of Egyptian deities defined by the priests of Heliopolis. Nephthys is depicted in human form wearing a crown in the style of the hieroglyphic for a mansion, the translation of her Egyptian name. She can also take the form of a hawk watching over the funeral bier of Osiris. According to legend Nephthys liaised briefly with Osiris and bore the mortuary god ANUBIS. She is said to guide the dead Egyptian ruler through the dark underworld and to weep for him. Also Neb-hut (Egyptian)....
God name
"Ogdoad"
Egypt Primordial forces. The elements of chaos, eight in number, which existed before the creation of the Sun god and which are known from Khemnu in Middle Egypt (Greek Heliopolis). The Ogdoad also had a sanctuary at Medinet Habu. They created, out of themselves rather than by sexual coupling, the mound which emerged from the primeval waters and upon which rested the egg from which the young Sun god emerged. They are usually depicted as baboons heralding the Sun as it rises. They are grouped in pairs and include NUN and NAUNET representing the primordial abyss, KEK and KAUKET representing darkness, HEH and HAUHET representing infinity, and AMUN and AMAUNET representing hidden power....
Goddess name
"Onuris [Greek]"
Egypt God of hunting and war. Onuris is first known from This, near Abydos in Upper Egypt. In later times his main cult center was at Samannud in the Nile delta. His consort is the lion goddess Mekhit. Onuris is generally depicted in human form as a bearded figure wearing a crown with four plumes and wielding a spear or occasionally holding a rope. He is sometimes accompanied by Mekhit in iconography. Seen as a hunter who caught and slew the enemies of RE, the Egyptian Sun god, some legends place him close to the battle between HORUS and SETH. In clåśśical times, Onuris became largely syncretized with the Greek war god ARES. Also Anhuret (Egyptian)....
Goddess name
"Renenutet"
Egypt Snake goddess. Also possessing fertility connotations, she guarded the pharaoh in the form of a cobra. There is some evidence that she enjoyed a cult in the Faiyum, the highly fertile region of the Nile valley. She is depicted either in human form or as a hooded cobra, in which case she bears close åśśociation with the goddess WADJET who is embodied in the uraeus. Her gaze has the power to conquer enemies. In her capacity as a fertility goddess she suckles infant rulers and provides good crops and harvests, linked in this capacity to OSIRIS and the more ancient grain god NEPER. She is also a magical power residing in the linen robe of the pharaoh and in the linen bandages with which he is swathed in death. At Edfu Renenutet takes the title “lady of the robes.” In the Greco-Roman period, she became adopted by the Greeks as the goddess Hermouthis and was syncretized with ISIS....
Goddess name
"Serket(-hetyt)"
Egypt Minor mortuary goddess. Known from the middle of the third millennium BC, she protects the throne of the king in the guise of a scorpion. She is depicted in human form wearing a headpiece in the form of a scorpion with its sting raised. In the Pyramid Texts she is the mother of the scorpion god NEHEBU-KAU. In her role as a mortuary goddess she is partly responsible for guarding the jars containing the viscera of the deceased. Although she is never identified as warding off the effect of scorpion stings, her influence has been regarded as effective against other venomous attacks. Also Selkis (Greek)....
Goddess name
"Sobek (rager)"
Egypt God epitomizing the might of the pharaohs. Said to be the son of NEITH, the creator goddess of Sais. He is depicted as a crocodile wearing a plumed headdress, or as a part-human hybrid. The crocodile imagery suggests an ability to attack and kill with sudden speed. Sobek's cult was extensive along the Nile valley, but was particularly prominent in the fertile Faiyum region. Near Aswan in Upper Egypt a sanctuary dedicated to Sobek identifies him as the consort of HATHOR and the father of KHONSU. Also Suchos (Greek)....
God name
"Sokar"
Egypt Chthonic underworld god. Guardian deity of the necropolis at Memphis with possible fertility connotations and with strong links to OSIRIS beside whom he is also perceived as a restored god of the dead. He is also syncretized with the Memphis creator god PTAH in the Old kingdom (circa 4500 BC), where he may have originated as a god of various crafts åśśociated with the manufacture of funerary trappings. He is depicted either as a hawk on a boat, or in human form with the head of a hawk and an elaborate atef crown (see Osiris). Sokar also enjoyed a major cult at Thebes where, in an annual festival celebrating the healthy continuation of the Divine kingship, he was conveyed in an elaborate barque. Also Sokaris (Greek)....
Goddess name
"Sothis [Greek]"
Egypt Astral goddess. She heralds the Nile inundation as the personification of the star Sirius which rises coincidentally in the dawn sky in July. She is depicted as a nude figure wearing the conical white crown of Lower Egypt surmounted by a star. Late in Egyptian history she becomes largely syncretized with ISIS. Also Sopdet (Egyptian)....

"A"
Egypt / Greek A, among the Egyptians is denoted by the hieroglyphic which represents the ibis. Among the Greeks it was the symbol of a bad augury in the sacrifices.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9   ...   91

8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.