8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Hera" - 135 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Elara"
Greek A daughter of Orchomenus or Minyas, who became by Zeus the mother of the giant Tityus and Zeus, from fear of Hera, concealed her under the earth. (Apollodorus i. Argonautica) This was where she gave birth to Tityas, who some traditions state to be the son of Elara and Gaia, the earth goddess. Greek
God name
"Eleuther"
Greek A son of Apollo and Aethusa, the daughter of Poseidon, was regarded as the founder of Eleutherae in Boeotia. He was the grandfather of Jasius and Poemander, the founder of Tanagra. He is said to have been the first that erected a statue of Dionysus, and spread the worship of the god. Greek
God name
"Endursaga"
Mesopotamia Herald god Mesopotamia / Sumeria
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Endursaga (lofty mace)"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian Herald god. He leads the Sumerian pantheon particularly in times of conflict. Also IS UM (Akkadian)....

"Epaphos aka Epaphus"
Greek A son of Zeus and Io, who was born on the river Nile, after the long wanderings of his mother. He was then concealed by the Curetes, by the request of Hera, but Io sought and afterwards found him in Syria. Greek
King name
"Epaphus"
Greek A son of Zeus and was concealed by the Curetes, by the request of Hera. He subsequently became king of Egypt and built the city of Memphis. Greek
God name
"Ephialtes"
Greek One of the giants, who in the war against the gods was deprived of his left eye by Apollo, and of the right by Heracles. Greek
Goddess name
"Eris"
Greek Born of Ate and Zeus, or, according to Homer, Hera and Zeus (Iliad IV), she is the goddess who calls forth war and discord. According to the Iliad, she wanders about, at first small and insignificant, but she soon raises her head up to heaven (IV). Greek
God name
"Euboea"
Greek A daughter of the river-god Asterion near Mycenae, who together with her sisters Acraea and Prosymna acted as nurses to Hera. Greek

"Euphorbus"
Greek A son of Panthous and brother of Hyperenor, was one of the bravest among the Trojans. He was the first who wounded Patroclus, but was afterwards slain by Menelaus, who subsequently dedicated the shield of Euphorbus in the temple of Hera, near Mycenae. Greek

"Eurybates"
Greek The herald of Odysseus, who followed his master to Troy. He is humorously described as hump-backed, of a brown complexion, and witn curly hair; but he was honoured by his master, since he was kind and obedient. Greek

"Eurynome"
Greek A daughter of Oceåñuś. When Hephaestus was expelled by Hera from Olympus, Eurynome and Thetis received him in the bosom of the sea. Greek

"Faula"
Greek Was, according to some, a concubine of Heracles in Italy while, according to others, she was the wife or sister of Faunus. Latinus, who is called a son of Heracles by a concubine, was probably considered to be the son of Faula whereas the common tradition describes him as a son of Faunus. Faula was identified by some of the ancients with the Greek Aphrodite. Greek

"Gamelii"
Greek The divinities protecting and presiding over marriage. Plutarch says, that those who married required the protection of five divinities: Zeus, Hera, Aphrodite, Peitho, and Artemis. Greek

"Garåñuś"
Italy A shepherd of gigantic bodily strength, who is said to have come from Greece into Italy in the reign of Evander, and slew Cacus. Aurelius Victor calls him Recaråñuś, but both writers agree in identifying him with the Greek Heracles. Italy
King name
"Geryones Geryon"
Greek A son of Chrysaor and Calirrhoe, a fabulous king of Hesperia, who is described as a being with three heads, and possessing magnificent oxen in the island of Erytheia. He acts a prominent part in the stories of Heracles. Greek
God name
"Gilgamesh"
Greek A demigod of superhuman strength who built a great wall to defend his people from external threats, a sort of Sumerian equivalent to the Greek Heracles.

"Griffin"
Greek Griffon or Gryphon, has the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. In heraldry the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature.
God name
"HERYSAF (he who is upon his lake)"
Egypt Primeval deity åśśociated both with Osiris and Re. Herysaf is a ram god said to have emerged from the primeval ocean, possibly recreated in the form of a sacred lake at Hnes, the capital of Lower Egypt for a time at the beginning of the third millennium (during the First Intermediate Period). The god is depicted with a human torso and the head of a ram wearing the atef crown of Lower Egypt. Herysaf began as a local deity but took on national importance as the soul (ba) of RE, and of OSIRIS. Herysaf's sanctuary was enlarged by Rameses II and the god is said to have protected the life of the last Egyptian pharaoh when the Persian and later Macedonian dominations began. He eventually became syncretized with HERAKLES in Greco-Roman culture and Hnes became known as Herakleopolis ...
Goddess name
"Hadad"
Western Semitic / Syrian / Phoenician weather god. Derived from the Akkadian deity ADAD. In texts found at the site of the ancient Canaanite capital of Ugarit [Ras Samra] , the name of Hadad apparently becomes a substitute for that of BAAL. His voice is described as roaring from the clouds and his weapon is the thunderbolt. His mother is the goddess ASERAH. During Hellenic times he was predominantly worshiped at Ptolemais and Hierapolis. His Syrian consort is ATARGATIS, who overshadowed him in local popularity at Hierapolis. Statues of the two deities were carried in procession to the sea twice yearly. According to the Jewish writer Josephus, Hadad also enjoyed a major cult following at Damascus in the eighth and ninth centuries BC. By the third century BC the Hadad-Atargatis cult had extended to Egypt, when he becomes identified as the god SUTEKH. In the Greek tradition his consort becomes HERA.See also ADAD....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.