8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Indian" - 151 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Kama/ Kama[Deva]"
Hindu / Puranic / Indian A god of love & carnal desire
God name
"Kitanitowit (good creator)"
Algonquin Indian / eastern Canada Creator god. The first being who is present everywhere in the universe. He is invisible and is represented diagrammatically by a point surrounded by a circle on which are marked the four quarters....
Spirit name
"Koyote"
North American Indian Tutelary god. Recognized by several tribes, including the Navaho and Apache. He acts as a cult hero who intercedes with more remote creator spirits and teaches the Indian....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Deities name
"Krishna"
Indian The modern deity Krishna is the most celebrated hero of Indian mythology, and the most popular of all the deities. He is said to be the eighth Avatara or incarnation of Vishnu, or rather a direct manifestation of Vishnu himself. This hero, around whom a vast måśś of legend and fable has been gathered, probably lived in the Epic age, when the Hindus had not advanced far beyond their early settlements in the north-west.
God name
"Ku'nkunxuliga"
Ma'malelegale Indian / British Columbia, Canada Tribal god. The personification of the thunderbird, known to many Indian tribes, who lives in a palace in the upper world. The noise of the thunder is the beating of its wings....
Supreme god name
"Kuçúɱatz"
Mayan / Quiche Indian, Mesoamerican / Mexico Supreme god. An androgynous being who created all things out of itself. Comparable with KUKULCAN....
God name
"Kumokums"
Modoc Indian / Oregon, USA Creator god. He sat beside Tule lake, which was all that existed, and created the world by scooping out mud to form the earth. He added animals and plants, but finally became tired and went to sleep in a hole at the bottom of the lake, which he dug using a hill as a shovel....
Goddess name
"Lakshimi"
Indian She is the goddess of beauty & wealth, but very fickle & claims no god can sustain her for very long
God name
"Lalaia'il"
Bella Coola Indian / British Columbia, Canada God of shamans. The deity who initiates into the shamanistic circle. He lives in the Forest and carries a wooden wand bound with cedar bark which he waves, creating a singing noise. He also frequents woodland lakes and ponds. When a woman meets him she is said to menstruate, while a man develops a nose bleed. Also Kle-klati-e'il....
God name
"Lendix-Tcux"
Chilcotin Indian / British Columbia, Canada Tutelary god. The so-called transformer known by different names among many Indian tribes. He is a wanderer who can change shape from human to animal and who educates the human race. He often appears in the guise of a raven, or as a dog, and has three sons....
Monster name
"Lu' dja lako"
Indians Lu Dja Lako, a monster bull turtle. Southeastern Indians
Spirit name
"Maheo"
Cheyenne The void dwelling omnipotent Great spirit and creator who created the water, light and air. With the help of Coot he made land by placing mud on the back of Grandmother Turtle, who then became the earth. Cheyenne Indians

"Mahpiyato"
Lakota After the time of creation, the world was divided into three regions; the sky, the earth and waters and the underworld. When Mahpiyato created humans, they were placed in the subterranean region.. The Lakota, Plains Indians
God name
"Makowasendo"
Mexico The sky god is the husband of Nangkwijo, the earth. The Tewa, Pueblo Indians, New Mexico and Arizona
Goddess name
"Mama Qoca (mother sea)"
Inca / pre - Columbian South America / Peru, etc Goddess of the ocean. Originally a pre-Inca goddess of coastal regions who retained her influence under Inca rule. Invoked by all Indians who gain their livelihood from the sea. Today probably syncretized largely with the Christian Virgin Mary. Also Mama Cocha....
Goddess name
"Mama-Kilya (mother moon)"
Inca / pre - Columbian South America / Peru, etc moon goddess. The consort of the Sun god INTI, she is important in the calculation of time and regulating the Inca festival calendar. The Indians consider that an eclipse of the moon is a time of great danger, caused by a mountain lion or snake eating the moon, and perform a ritual making as much noise as possible to frighten the predator off....
Goddess name
"Manasi"
Indian The Goddess of Snakes. Indian
Goddess name
"Manasvi"
Indian The goddess "That which controls mind". Indian
Goddess name
"Manisha"
Indian Goddess of mind; intelligence, desires and wishes. Indian
Spirit name
"Manitu"
Algonquin Indian / USA Creator god. A vaguely defined being who controls all things and imparts knowledge to the tribe. He may be identified as the great spirit in the sky. Probably similar to MANITO....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.