8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Indian" - 151 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Manmatha"
Dravidian / Tamil Form of the god of carnal love. A local southern Indian form of Kama with similar attributes and genealogy, named in Sangam literature....
Supreme god name
"Meiechei (master of men)"
Araucania Indian / southern Andes Supreme god. Also known as Pillan (heaven) and, west of the Andes, Guenu-Pillan (spirit of heaven)....

"Meru"
Indian A fabulous mountain in the centre of the world, 80,000 leagues high, the abode of Vishnu, and a perfect Paradise. It may be termed the Indian Olympus.
Goddess name
"Metsaka"
Huichol Indian / Mesoamerican / Mexico moon goddess. Known as “grandmother moon,” she is the consort of the fire god TATEVALI. She guards the Huichol against the god of death, TOKAKAMI....
God name
"Mi-Lo Fo"
Chinese Buddhist God. The local name given to the BODHISATTVA MAITREYA. Like the Indian model he is represented as a rubicund figure. Attributes include roses and a purse....
God name
"Mithras"
Greco - Roman God of soldiers. Derived from the Indian-Persian model. He became particularly prominent among military people throughout the Roman Empire during the first and second centuries AD, as a god symbolizing loyalty and truth. The cult was performed in an underground temple, the mitbraeum, and involved the sacrifice of a bull. Mithraism, under Roman influence, was an exclusively male cult....
God name
"Moma"
Uitoto Indian / South America Creator god. Originally the creator of mankind. When he was slain he entered and ruled the underworld. Also the apotheosis of the moon....

"Mowis"
Indian The bridegroom of snow, who, according to American Indian tradition, wooed and won a beautiful bride; but when morning dawned, Mowis left the wigwam, and melted into the Sunshine. The bride hunted for him night and day in the Forests, but never saw him more.
God name
"Nainuema"
Uitoto Indian / South America Creator god. He created the earth from his own imagination and stamped upon it until it was flat. He then engendered the Forests and other living things from his saliva....
Demon name
"Nataraja (lord of the dance)"
Hindu / Puranic Form of the god SI IVA. Emerging from AD 1200 onward, this form depicts SI iva as “lord of the dance” ringed by fire and with one foot on a demon in the form of a black dwarf. Nataraja arguably epitomizes the moving power in the cosmos. Largely seen in southern Indian bronzes which display the dance-form anandatandava....
Deity name
"Natos"
Indians Sun deity of the Blackfoot Indians.
God name
"Ni"
Chimu Indian / pre - Columbian South America / coastal areas of Peru Sea god. A significant deity in the pantheon, revered by fishermen. Often linked with SI, the moon god....
Spirit name
"O'meai"
Na'kwaxdax Indian / British Columbia, Canada Tribal spirit. The chief of the ancients who lives in “Narrow Entrance at Open Plain” and whose siblings are the “myth people.”...
God name
"Oshats"
Mexico A sky god and the Sun. The Sia, Pueblo Indians. New Mexico
God name
"Owiot"
Luiseno Indian / California, USA moon god. The ancestral deity of the tribe....
Deities name
"Oxiahun Ti Ku"
Mayan / Mesoamerican / Mexico sky gods. The collective name for a group of thirteen celestial deities who are probably still invoked by Mesoamerican Indians today....
God name
"Pachacamac (earth creator)"
South American Indian / Lima region of Peru Creator god. Near the town of Pachacamac is the site of a huge pyramidal sanctuary dedicated to the god. In origin he is pre-Inca but the Inca rulers who took over the region allowed his worship to continue; eventually he became syncretized with the god VAIRACOCHA....
Spirit name
"Pah-ah"
Indians The Great spirit of the Paiute Indians.
Spirit name
"Pahtumawas"
Indians The Great spirit of the Lenape Indians
God name
"Pakrokitat"
California Creator god who made people with a face at the front and back of their heads. After a hissy fit, he decended to the middle of the earth. The Serrano Indians, California
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8 ways to attend college for free

With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.

However, the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.

If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.

We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.

Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.



7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.