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The correspondence of the Roman and Greek gods   Egyptian gods   God of the sea   Indian goddess   God of water   God of war  

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List of Gods : "Latin"
NameOriginDescription
Aiolos/ Aelus Latin/ Greek The ruler of the winds
Amata Greek The wife of king Latinus and mother of Lavinia.
Bel Babylonian Signifying "lord" or "master", is a title rather than a genuine name, applied to various gods in Babylonian religion. The feminine form is Belit 'Lady, Mistress'. Bel is represented in Greek and Latin by Belos and Belus respectively. Linguistically Bel is an East Semitic form cognate with Northwest Semitic Ba‘al with the same meaning.
Ceres Greek The Latin name for Demeter; also the name of one of the asteroids, the first discovered, by Piazzi, in 1801. Greek
Dei Judicium Latin The judgment of God; so the judgment by ordeals was called, because it was supposed that God would deal rightly with the appellants. Latin
Deus Munificentissimus Roman Latin for "The most bountiful God"
Doris Greek A daughter of Oceanus and Thetys, and the wife of her brother Nereus, by whom she became the mother of the Nereides. (Theogony 240, Metamorphoses by Ovid ii. 269.) The Latin poets sometimes use the name of this marine divinity for the sea itself. Greek
Elysion Greek A section of the Underworld (the spelling Elysium is a Latinization of the Greek word Elysion). Elysium is an obscure and mysterious name that evolved from a designation of a place or person struck by lightning, enelysion, enelysios. Greek
Eos Greek In Latin Aurora, the goddess of the morning red, who brings up the light of day from the east. She was a daughter of Hyperion and Theia or Euryphassa, and a sister of Helios and Selene. Greek
Eros Greek In Latin, Amor or Cupido, the god of love. In the sense in which he is usually conceived, Eros is the creature of the later Greek poets; and in order to understand the ancients properly we must distinguish three Erotes: viz. the Eros of the ancient cosmogonies, the Eros of the philosophers and mysteries, who bears great resemblance to the first, and the Eros whom we meet with in the epigrammatic and erotic poets, whose witty and playful descriptions of the god, however, can scarcely be considered as a part of the ancient religious belief of the Greeks. Greek
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Fascinus Roman An early Latin divinity, and identical with Mutinus or Tutinus. He was worshipped as the protector from sorcery, witchcraft, and evil daemons and represented in the form of a phallus, the genuine Latin for which iafascimtm, this symbol being believed to be most efficient in averting all evil influences. He was especially invoked to protect women in childbed and their offspring.
Faula Greek Was, according to some, a concubine of Heracles in Italy while, according to others, she was the wife or sister of Faunus. Latinus, who is called a son of Heracles by a concubine, was probably considered to be the son of Faula whereas the common tradition describes him as a son of Faunus. Faula was identified by some of the ancients with the Greek Aphrodite. Greek
Faunus Roman The son of Picus and father of Latinus, was the third in the series of the kings of the Laurentes. In his reign Faunus, like his two predecessors, Picus and Saturn, had promoted agriculture and the breeding of cattle among his subjects, and also distinguished himself as a hunter. Roman
Flatulus Discworld The Ephebian God of the Winds. His name comes from "flatus", Latin for breaking wind. Discworld
Genius Loci Latin The tutelary deity of a place. Latin
Hecabe Greek Or in Latin Hecuba, a daughter of Dymas in Phrygia, and second wife of Priam, king of Troy. Some described her as a daughter of Cisseus, or the Phrygian river-god Sangarius and Metope. Greek
Hundred-eyed Greek Argus, in Greek and Latin fable. Juno appointed him guardian of Io [the cow], but Jupiter caused him to be put to death, whereupon Juno transplanted his eyes into the tail of her peacock.
Jove Greek "He who thunders from on high", archaic latin for the father god, and is another name for Jupiter
Kaleda Selavonic The god of peace, somewhat similar to the Latin Janus. His feast was celebrated on the 24th of December. Selavonic
Latinus Greek A king of Latium, is described in the common tradition as a son of Faunus and the nymph Marica, as a brother of Lavinius, and the husband of Amata, by whom he became the father of Lavinia, whom he gave in marriage to Aeneas. Greek
Leto Greek In Latin Latona, according to Hesiod (Theogony of Hesiod), a daughter of the Titan Coeus and Phoebe, a sister of Asteria, and the mother of Apollo and Artemis by Zeus, to whom, she was married before Hera. Greek
Limits Greek The Latin Fames, or personification of hunger. Hesiod describes hunger as the offspring of Eris or Discord. A poetical description of Fames occurs in Ovid and Virgil places it along with other monsters, at the entrance of Orcus. Greek
Lycisca Greek Half-wolf, half-dog. One of the dogs of Act?on. In Latin it is a common term for a sheperd's dog, and is so used by Virgil. Greek
Moon-drop Roman In Latin, virus lunare, a vaporous drop supposed to be shed by the moon on certain herbs and other objects, when influenced by incantations. Roman
Ossa Greek The personification of rumour or report, the Latin Fama. As it is often impossible to trace a report to its source, it is said to come from Zeus, and hence Ossa is called the messenger of Zeus. Greek
Proserpine Greek In Latin Proserpina, the daughter of Zeus and Demeter.
Selene Greek Also called Mene, a female divinity presiding over the months, or Latin Luna, was the goddess of the moon, or the moon personified into a divine being. She is called a daughter of Hyperion and Theia, and accordingly a sister of Helios and Eos (Theogony 371 ; Apollodorus; Argonautica) ; but others speak of her as a daughter of Hyperion by Euryphaessa, or of Pallas, or of Zeus and Latona, or lastly of Helios. Greek
Silvanus Roman A Latin divinity of the fields and forests, to whom in the very earliest times the Tyrrhenian Pelasgians are said to have dedicated a grove and a festival. He is described as a god watching over the fields and husbandmen, and is also called the protector of the boundaries of fields.
Specter Latin Spectre. Any apparition, although most commonly associated with the dead. Latin
Thanatos Greek Latin Mors, a personification of Death. In the Homeric poems Death does not appear as a distinct divinity, though he is described as the brother of Sleep, together with whom he carries the body of Sarpedon from the field of battle to the country of the Lycians. Greek
Tyrrheus Roman A shepherd of king Latinus. Ascanius once, while hunting, killed a tame stag belonging to Tyrrheus whereupon the country people took up arms, which was the first conflict in Italy between the natives and the Trojan settlers. Roman
Uranus Greek Also known as Ouranos, the Latin Caelus, a son of Gaea (Theogony of Hesiod 126), but is also called the husband of Gaea, and by her the father of Oceanus, Coeus, Crius, Hyperion, Lapetus, Theia, Rheia, Themis, Mnemosyne, Phoebe, Tethys, Cronos, of the Cyclopes, Brontes, Steropes, Arges, and of the Hecatoncheires Cottus, Briareus and Gyes. (Theogony 133) Greek