A : B : C : D : E : F : G : H : I : J : K : L : M : N : O : P : Q : R : S : T : U : V : W : X : Y : Z :
The correspondence of the Roman and Greek gods   Egyptian gods   God of the sea   Indian goddess   God of water   God of war  

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List of Gods : "N"
NameOriginDescription
Aahmes Nefertari Egypt Protector/punisher of humans elevated to goddesshood Egypt
Aam Egyptian A name for the god Tem, a form of the sun god in the city of Annu. The Book of the Dead associates Aam with the sun god Ra. Egyptian
Aarvak Norse Aka. Arvaka, [Early awake]. The name of one of the horses of the sun. Norse.
Aatxe Basque A Basque ghost. He is a cave-dwelling divinity who adopts the form of a young red bull, but sometimes in the shape of a man. At night, more so in stormy weather, he arises from the hollow which is his lair, also known as Euskal Herria. He attacks criminals and other mean people. He also protects people by making them stay home when danger is near.
Abaangui Guarani Had a huge nose, which he cut off. When he threw it into the sky, it became the moon. Guarani
Abaasy Yakut Netherworld beings. Yakut
Abaddon Babylonian It is the second of the seven names of the underworld in the Babylonian Talmud. Chief of the demons of the 7th hierarchy Hebrew/Christian
Abassi Efik The creator god of the Nigerian Efik people. On the suggestion of his wife Atai Abassi created the first humans; to prevent them from exceed his wisdom, he ordered the first humans to neither procreate nor labor. This prohibition lasted some time, but eventually the first couple did have children and work, for which crime Abassi slew them and set their children against each other.
Abdiel Arabic An Arabic demon said to be the lord of slaves and slavery. His name is derived from the Arabic word 'Abd', meaning 'slave'.
Abel and Cain Islam Cain was born with a twin sister who was named Aclima, and Abel with a twin sister named Jumella. Adam wished Cain to marry Abel's twin sister, and Abel to marry Cain's. Cain would not consent to this arrangement, and Adam proposed to refer the question to God by means of a sacrifice. God rejected Cain's sacrifice to signify his disapproval of his marriage with Aclima, his twin sister, and Cain slew his brother in a fit of jealousy. Islam
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Abhaswaras Hindu A class of deities, sixty-four in number, of whose nature little is known. Hindu
Abhijit Hindu Name means triumphator. A benevolent astral deity and goddess of fortune Hindu/Puranic
Abida Kalmuck A god of the Kalmucks, who receives the souls of the dead at the moment of decease, and gives them permission to enter a new body, either human or not, and have another spell of life on earth. If the spirit is spotless it may, if it likes, rise and live in the air.
Abnona Gaul Goddess who did not give her name to the river Avon. Gaul
Abonde French The French Santa Claus, the good fairy who comes at night to bring toys to children while they sleep, especially on New Year's Day.
Abracadabra Assyrians A charm. It is said that Abracadabra was the supreme deity of the Assyrians. Q. Severus Sammonicus recommended the use of the word as a powerful antidote against ague, flux, and toothache. The word was to be written on parchment, and suspended round the neck by a linen thread.
Abracax Greek Also written Abraxas or Abrasax, in Persian mythology denotes the Supreme Being. In Greek notation it stands for 365. In Persian mythology Abracax presides over 365 impersonated virtues, one of which is supposed to prevail on each day of the year. In the second century the word was employed by the Basilidians for the deity; it was also the principle of the Gnostic hierarchy, and that from which sprang their numerous Жons.
Abraham aka Avraham Arabic Ashkenazi, Avrohom, Avruhom, regarded as the founding patriarch of the Israelites and of the Arabic people in Jewish, Christian and Islamic tradition. In that tradition, Abraham is brought by God from his home in the ancient city of Ur into a new land, Canaan, where he enters into a covenant: in exchange for sole recognition of Yahweh as supreme universal authority.
Abraxas Greek Aka Abraxis, Abrsax, viewed as the supreme deity and the source of divine emanations, the ruler of all the 365 heavens, or circles of creation--one for each day of the year. The number 365 corresponds to the numerical value of the seven Greek letters that form the word abraxas. The name Abraxas was taken from abra-cadabra.
Acala aka Achala Buddhist/India Acala, is the best known of the Five Wisdom Kings of the Womb Realm. Acala means "The Immovable One" in Sanskrit. Acala is also the name of the eighth of the ten stages of the path to buddhahood. Acala is the destroyer of delusion and the protector of Buddhism. Buddhist/India
Acar Enochian A minor angel ruled by Rzionr Nrzfm. Enochian
Acephali Libya A fabulous race of people, reported by ancient writers to have had no heads. Libya
Acestes Roman A son of the Sicilian river-god Crimisus and of a Trojan woman of the name of Egesta or Segesta
Achaiah Christian The angel into serenity, patience, tranquility and the secrets of nature. Christian
Acheri Indian They are the ghosts of little girls, who live on the tops of mountains but descend at night to hold their revels in more convenient places. Indian
Acheron Greek Acheron a son of Helios and Gaea or Demeter, and was changed into the river bearing his name in the lower world, because he had refreshed the Titans with drink during their contest with Zeus.
Achilles Greek The son of Peleus, king of the Myrmidones in Phthiotis, in Thessaly, and of the Nereid Thetis.
Achiroe Greek According to Apollodorus ii Anchinoe, which is perhaps a mistake for Anchiroe, was a daughter of Nilus, and the wife of Belus, by whom she became the mother of Aegyptus and Danaus.
Achlys Greek According to some ancient cosmogonies, the eternal night, and the first created being which existed even before Chaos. According to Hesiod, she was the personification of misery and sadness, and as such she was represented on the shield of Heracles: pale, emaciated, and weeping, with chattering teeth, swollen knees, long nails on her fingers, bloody cheeks, and her shoulders thickly covered with dust.
Achor Cyrenea God of flies, worshipped by the Cyreneans, that they might not be annoyed with these tiny tormentors.
Achtland Celtic Goddess queen who no mortal man could sexually satisfy, so she took a giant from the faery realm as her mate. Celtic
Aclahayr Greek Of the fourth hour of the Nuctemeron, the genius spirit.
Acraea Greek A daughter of the river-god Asterion near Mycenae, who together with her sisters Euboea and Prosymna acted as nurses to Hera.
Acrasia Britain Self-indulgence. An enchantress who lived in the "Bower of Bliss," situate in "Wandering Island" She transformed her lovers into monstrous shapes, and kept them captives. Sir Guyon having crept up softly, threw a net over her, and bound her in chains of adamant; then broke down her bower and burnt it to ashes. Britain.
Actaea Greek A daughter of Nereus and Doris. Greek
Actaeon Greek Son of Aristaeus and Autonoe, a daughter of Cadmus. He was trained in the art of hunting by the centaur Cheiron, and was afterwards torn to pieces by his own 50 hounds on mount Cithaeron. The names of these hounds are given by Ovid (Metamorphoses III) and Hyginus.
Actor Greek Son of Aristaeus and Autonoe, a daughter of Cadmus. He was trained in the art of hunting by the centaur Cheiron, and was afterwards torn to pieces by his own 50 hounds on mount Cithaeron. The names of these hounds are given by Ovid (Metamorphoses III) and Hyginus.
Adam[m]as Nassenes The parental godhead of the gnostic movement
Adamanthea Greek A nymph who nursed Zeus Greek
Adammas Nassenes Along with Sophea, the male half of the first couple on the earth. Nassenes
Addanc aka adanc Welsh Addane, afanc, avanc, abhac, abac, a lake monster that also appears in Celtic and British folklore. It is described alternately as resembling a crocodile, beaver or dwarf, and is sometimes said to be a demon. The lake in which it dwells also varies; it is variously said to live in Llyn Llion, Llyn Barfog, near Brynberian Bridge or in Llyn yr Afanc, a lake in Betws-y-Coed that was named after the creature. Welsh
Adnachiel Christian The angel of the sun sign Sagittarius. Ask him nicely and he'll grant you independence, honesty and chat-up lines. Christian
Adrastea British An alternative name for Nemesis. British
Adrasteia Greek A Cretan nymph, daughter of Melisseus, to whom Rhea entrusted the infant Zeus to be reared in the Dictaean grotto.
Aea Greek Was the Nymph of a spring, well or fountain of the Black Sea town of Aia who was loved by the local river-god Phasis. Greek
Aebhel Afekan Melanesia/ New Guinea The creator goddess
Aedos Roman The goddess or spirit of modesty, reverence and respect. She was a close companion of the goddess Nemesis. Roman
Aega Greek A daughter of Olenus, who was a descendant of Hephaestus. Aega and her sister Helice nursed the infant Zeus in Crete, and the former was afterwards changed by the god into the constellation called Capella. Greek
Aegeirus Greek A Hamadryad nymph of the Oak tree. Greek
Aegir Norse The Norse god who presides over the stormy sea. He entertains the gods every harvest, and brews ale for them.
Aegle Greek 1. The most beautiful of the Naiads, daughter of Zeus and Neaera by whom Helios begot the Charites.
Aeneas Greek The son of Anchises and Aphrodite, and born on mount Ida. On his father's side he was a greatgrandson of Tros, and thus nearly related to the royal house of Troy, as Priam himself was a grandson of Tros. He was educated from his infancy at Dardanus, in the house of Alcathous, the husband of his sister.
Aeolus Greece In the mythical history of Greece there are three personages of this name, who are spoken of by ancient writers as connected with one another, but this connexion is so confused, that it is impossible to gain a clear view of them.
Aesir Germanic Pantheon of the gods norse/germanic
Aesma Persian An outrageous and assaulting demon, whose name has been thought to be reflected as Asmodaeus in the Book of Tobit. Persian
Aestas Roman Goddess of summer usually portrayed nude and adorned with garlands of grain. Roman
Aesun Ireland Irish early god whose name means "to be." Most likely part of a lost creation myth. Aesun was also known by the Persians and Umbria and Scandinavia. Ireland
Aethra Greek A daughter of king Pittheus of Troezen. Bellerophon sued for her hand, but was banished from Corinth before the nuptials took place.
Aetna Roman A Sicilian nymph, and according to Alcimus, a daughter of Uranus and Gaea, or of Briareus. Simonides said that she had acted as arbitrator between Hephaestus and Demeter respecting the possession of Sicily.
Afi Abkhaz God of rain and thunderstorms who does not tolerate women using his name. Abkhaz
Afriel Christian Angel who safeguards children, though not that well. Christian
Agaman Nibo Haiti Goddess of the dead. Haiti
Aglaia Greek One of the Charites. 2. The wife of Charopus and mother of Nireus, who led a small band from the island of Syme against Troy. Another Agiaia is mentioned in Apollodorus. (Apollodorus. ii)
Aglibol Roman/Syria/Greek/Palmaryia A lunar deity in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. His name means "Calf of Bel" ("Calf of the Lord"). He is depicted with a Lunar disk decorating his head, and sometimes his shoulders. Roman/Syria/Greek/Palmaryia
Agnar Norse A son of King Hraudung and foster-son of Frigg. Norse
Agrona Welsh A goddess of strife and war worshipped in Britain. The river Aeron in Wales comes from her name. Welsh
Ah Bolom Tzacab Mayan Meaning "the lead-nosed god," he was a god of agriculture, thunder and rain. He was depicted with a leaf in his nose. Mayan
Ah Wink ir Masa Guatemala Nature goddess Guatemala
Ahasverus Europe Better known by the name of the Wandering Jew.
Ahau Kin Mayan Meaning "lord of the sun face," he was a sun god and moon god; he had two manifestations. At night, he became a jaguar god and lord of the underworld. Mayan
Aheramenmthoou Egypt God of thunder, night, storms, wind, landslides and tidal waves. Egypt
Ahlmakoh Islands A demoniac wood-spirit. His nasal mucus plays an important part in rituals and is valued as an amulet for invulnerability. Vancouver Islands
Ahnt kai Mexico Goddess of women and children. Daughter of Koo-mah'mm hahs-ay' tahm (First Woman). She flies at night and lives above the peak of Tiburon. Mexico
Ahsonnutli America The sky father and chief god for the Navajo. He created heaven, Earth, and the sky.
Aibell Ireland Goddess of Munster whose legends were almost lost until she was 'demoted' to a faery queen. She had in her possession a magickal harp which did her bidding, but which human ears could not hear or else the eavesdropper would soon die. She was associated with stones and leaves. Ireland
Aibheaeg Ireland Fire goddess who had a magic well that contained mighty healing powers, especially effective against toothache so long as the petitioner left a small white stone at the well to represent the decayed tooth. She is associated with wells and the number 5. Ireland
Aides Greek Another name for Hades. Greek
Aife aka Aoife Ireland/Scotland Goddess and queen of the Isle of Shadow. She ran a school for warriors, but her school was less successful than her sister, Scathach's, school. Aife was not vulnerable to magic, and commanded a legion of fierce horsewomen. She stole an alphabet of knowledge from the deities to give to humankind. For that infraction, she was transformed into a crane by the elder deities. Ireland/Scotland
Aino Japan The name Fuji is believed to be derived from "Huchi" or "Fuchi", the words for the Aino Goddess of Fire. Japan
Airyaman Persia God of social bonds, contracts, and marriage who at the end of time will fish souls of the the temporarily damned called a Hell by using a net Persia
Aisha Qandisha Morocco "loving to be watered" a jinniya (female spirit), recognized by her beautiful face, pendulous breasts and goat legs. She was wanton and free, seducing young men, despite having a jinn-consort named Hammu Qaiyu. Her name strongly suggests a connection to the Qadesha, the sexually free temple women of Canaan who served Astarte. Morocco
Aius Locutius Gallic Loquens, was a Roman numen associated with the Gallic invasions of the early 4th century. In 390 BC, the Gauls moved in the direction of Rome. According to Roman folklore, a Roman named Caedicius kept hearing a disembodied nocturnal voice at the base of the Palatine hill in the Forum Romanum. The voice warned Caedicius of the oncoming attack and recommended that the walls of Rome be fortified.
Aix Greek A nymph and the wife of Pan. She was seduced by Zeus and bore him Aigipan. Aix is also mentioned as the nurse of the infant Zeus and may also identified with the Gorgon Aix.
Aja Surya Is the son of king Raghu, and thus a scion of the Ikshavaku dynasty, who claimed descent from the sun-God Surya. His paternal grandfather was the pious king Dileepa. King Aja's consort was the heavenly nymph Indumati; they were the parents of King Dasaratha of Ayodhya, who was the father of Rama.
Ajalamo Africa God of unborn children. Nigeria, West Africa
Ajysyt Siberia / Yakut Goddess of healing and birth. she writes every new birth into a golden book. Siberia
Akandoji Shinto This monster had stolen a great deal of gold and silver from the villagers. It was said that he was so terrible that no one dared go against him, to try to recover the riches. Shinto
Akasagarbha Buddhist/India Bodhisattva one of the eight great bodhisattvas. His name can be translated as "boundless space treasury" or "void store" as his wisdom is said to be boundless as space itself. He is sometimes known as the twin brother of the "earth store" bodhisattva Ksitigarbha. In Japan he is known as Kokuzo. Buddhist/India
Akbatekda Crow A variant name of Akbatekdia, the supreme being. The Crow, Montana
Akongo Ngombe Supreme and creator god. Ngombe
Aksobhya Buddhist 'immovable' or 'imperturbable' - is the name given to a Buddha who is said to reside in the eastern paradise of Abhirati. Buddhist
Al Raqim Quran The dog of the Seven Sleepers, now in Paradise and in charge of letters and other correspondence. Quran
Ala Nigeria Goddess of fertility, morality and of justice. Nigeria
Ala Ibo Nigeria Goddess of the earth in its dual aspect of fertility and death. Nigeria
Ala aka Ale Africa Ana, Ani, Chthonic fertility goddess who is also goddess of the underworld linked with a cult of the dead, which rest in her womb . Ibo Eastern Nigeria, West Africa
Alacomenia Greek One of the daughters of Ogyges, who as well as her two sisters, Thelxionoea and Aulis, were regarded as supernatural beings, who watched over oaths and saw that they were not taken rashly or thoughtlessly. Greek
Alaghom Naom Mayan Alaghom Naom goddess of wisdom, consciousness, education and the intellect. Also known as Alaghom Naom Tzentel and the Mother of Mind. Mayan
Alaghom Naom Tzentel Maya The goddess of thought & intellect
Alagonia Greek A daughter of Zeus and Europa, from whom Alagonia, a town in Laconia, derived its name. Greek
Alako Norway/Gypsy Sent to the earth as a human to reveal the secret laws and a band of lore of the the gypsies, he stayed over in a the moon. Norway/Gypsy
Alako/ Dundra Norway/ Gypsy Sent to the earth as a human to reveal the secret laws & a band of lore of the the gypsies, he stayed over in a the moon
Alasnam's Mirror Arabian The "touch-stone of virtue," given to Alasnam by one of the Genii. If he looked in this mirror it informed him whether a damsel would remain to him faithful or not. If the mirror remained unsullied so would the maiden; if it clouded, the maiden would prove faithless. Arabian
Alaunus Celtic a local name from the Mannheim area for Mecurius
Albadara Arab A bone which the Arabs say defies destruction, and which; at the resurrection, will be the germ of the new body. The Jews called it Luz and the "Os sacrum" refers probably to the same superstition.
Albion Britain Son of a forgotten Sea God who may have been part of a lost creation myth. Was once said to rule the Celtic world. His name became the poetic name for Britain.
Albion the Giant Britain Fourth son of Neptune, sixth son of Osiris, and brother of Hercules, his mother being Amphitrita. Albion the Giant was put by his father in possession of the isle of Britain, where he speedily subdued the Samotheans, the first inhabitants. His brother Bergion ruled over Ireland and the Orkneys. Another of his brothers was Lestrigo, who subjected Italy.
Albunea Greek A prophetic nymph or Sibyl, to whom in the neighbourhood of Tibur a grove was consecrated, with a well and a temple. Near it was the oracle of Faunus Fatidicus. (The Aeneid by Virgil vii)
Alcinous Greek A son of Nausithous, and grandson of Poseidon. His name is celebrated in the story of the Argonauts, and still more in that of the wanderings of Odysseus.
Alcmaeon Greek A son of Amphiaraus and Eriphyle, and brother of Amphilochus, Eurydice, and Demonassa. (Apollodorus iii) His mother was induced by the necklace of Harmonia, which she received from Polyneices, to persuade her husband Amphiaraus to take part in the expedition against Thebes.
Alcyoneus or Alcion Argonautica Jupiter sent Hercules against him for stealing some of the Sun's oxen. But Hercules could not do anything, for immediately the giant touched the earth he received fresh strength. At length Pallas carried him beyond the moon. His seven daughters were metamorphosed into halcyons. Argonautica
Alfhild Norse Goddess of wrestling norse
Alfodr or Alfadir Norse Alfodr or Alfadir [Father of all]. The name of Odin as the supreme god. Norse
Alfr Norse An elf, fairy; a class of beings like the dwarfs, between gods and men. They were of two kinds: elves of light (Ljosalfar) and elves of darkness (Dokkalfar). The abode of the elves is Alfheimr, fairy-land, and their king is the god Frey. Norse
Alfs Norse Male ancestral spirits. Norse
Alkonost Greek The bird of paradise in Slavic mythology. It has the body of a bird with the face of a woman. The name Alkonost came from the name of Greek demi-goddess Alcyone transformed by gods into a kingfisher.
Almha Ireland Goddess of the Tuatha De Danann and a hill in southern Ireland was named for her. Ireland
Alpanu aka Alpan Etruscan Goddess of love and one of the Lasas, and a ruler of the underworld. Possibly equated with the Greek goddess Persephone. In art, she was usually depicted as a nude or semi-nude winged maiden. Etruscan
Aluelp Greek An Indian nymph, who was passionately loved by Dionysus, but could not be induced to yield to his wishes, until the god changed himself into a tiger, and thus compelled her by fear to allow him to carry her across the river Sollax, which from this circumstance received the name of Tigris. Greek
Ama No Uzume Japan The goddess of dawn and revelry in the Shinto. She famously relates to the tale of the missing sun deity, Amaterasu. Japan
Ama-no-Koyane-no-mikoto Japan/Shinto Is a kami, a male deity of the Japanese religion of Shinto. He is one of the deities of Kasuga Shrine, Nara, Japan and is considered to be an ancestor of the Fujiwara family. Japan/Shinto
Amaimon Hebrew One of the chief devils whose dominion is on the north side of the infernal gulf. He might be bound or restrained from doing hurt from the third hour till noon, and from the ninth hour till evening. Hebrew
Amalivaca Native America A Native American spirit, who had seven daughters. He broke their legs to prevent their running away, and left them to people the forests.
Amalthea Greek? A nymph of springs
Amaltheia Crete The nurse of the infant Zeus after his birth in Crete. The ancients themselves appear to have been as uncertain about the etymology of the name as about the real nature of Amaltheia. Hesychius derives it from the verb to nourish or to enrich, others from firm or hard; and others again from to signify the divine goat, or the tender goddess. The common derivation is from to milk or suck.
Amathes Greek A son of Heracles, from whom the town of Amathus in Cyprus was believed to have derived its name.
Amatongo Zulu A generic name for ghosts. Zulu
Amayicoyondi Peru Goddess of the sky and the wife of Niparaja, the omnipotent supreme god and creator of heaven and earth. Peru
Ame No Uzume Japanese A goddess of fertility & happiness
Ame no Uzume no Mikoto Japan/Shinto Ame no Uzume no Mikoto, heavenly deity of divine movement, meditation, marriage and joy. Japan/Shinto
Ame-No-Minaka-Nushi-No-Kami Shinto (Exalted Musubi Deity), who is later related to the gods of the heaven; Kami-musubi no Kami (Sacred Musubi Deity), related to the gods of the earth; and Ame no Minaka-nushi no Kami (Heavenly Centre-Ruling Deity). Some Shinto scholars hold that all Shinto deities are manifestations of Ame no Minaka-nushi no Kami.
Ame-Waka-Hiko Japan/Shinto "Heaven prince young", the disloyal son of Ame no Kuni-dama who shot a pheasant with a heavenly deer-bow and heavenly feathered arrows. Taka-mi-musubi no Mikoto took up the arrow and flung it back down to earth. This arrow hit Ame-waka-hiko on the top of his breast and killed him. Japan/Shinto
Ament Egypt/Libya Aka Amenti, "The Westerner," "hidden goddess." Goddess of the Underworld and consort of Amen. She greeted all dead people to the land of the dead with bread and water. If they ate and drank, they could not return to the land of the living. Egypt/Libya
Ami Neter Egypt A singing god who rules over winds and song. Egypt
Amihan Philippines God of the North Wind. Philippines
Amitabha Buddhist/India A celestial buddha described in the scriptures of the Mahayana school of Buddhism. According to these scriptures, Amitabha possesses infinite merits resulting from good deeds over countless past lives as a bodhisattva named Dharmakara. Buddhist/India
Amma Dogon/ Mali The creator god with a novel story
Ammon Africa Originally an Aethiopian or Libyan divinity, whose worship subsequently spread all over Egypt, parts of Africa, and many parts of Greece. The real Egyptian name was Amun or Ammun.
Amnisiades Crete The nymphs of the river Amnistis in Crete, who are mentioned in connexion with the worship of Artemis there. (Argonautica.)
Among the Yoruba Africa / Nigeria Aja also refer to a "wild wind". It's believed that if someone is carried away by aja, and then returns,he becomes a powerful "jujuman". The journey supposedly will have a duration of between seven days to three months, and the person so carried is thought to have gone to the land of the dead or heaven (0run).
Amphion Greek A son of Zeus and Antiope, the daughter of Nycteus of Thebes, and twin-brother of Zethus.
Amphitrite Greek According to Hesiod (Theogony) and Apollodorus a Nereid, though in other places Apollodorus calls her an Oceanid. She is represented as the wife of Poseidon and the goddess of the sea (the Mediterranean), and she is therefore a kind of female Poseidon.
Ampulus Greek A Hamadryad nymph of the Vine tree.
Amunet/ Nuit Egypt A goddess of mystery
Amurru Akkadian Or Martu are also names given in Akkadian and Sumerian texts to the god of the Amorite/Amurru people, often forming part of personal names. He is sometimes called Ilu Amurru. Sometimes described as a 'shepherd', and as a son of the sky-god Anu.
Amycus Greek A son of Poseidon by Bithynis, or by the Bithyaiian nymph Melia. He was ruler of the country of the Bebryces, and when the Argonauts landed on the coast of his dominions, he challenged the bravest of them to a boxing match.
Anahita Persia "Queen of Heaven", name means "unstained" or "immaculate", was an ancient Persian deity.
Anakadundubhi Hindu "Drums", the father of Lord Krishna, a name of Vasudeva called thus because the drums of heaven resounded at his birth. Hindu
Anala Hindu/Puranic Is one of the Vasus, gods of the material world. He is equated with Agni, and the name usually used for Agni when listed among the Vasus. Hindu/Puranic
Ananga Hindu "The bodyless"; it is a name of Kama, god of love. Hindu
Ananke Roman The Protogenos of inevitability, compulsion and necessity and the personification of destiny, unalterable necessity and fate. She was also the mother of Adrasteia and of the Moirae. She was rarely worshipped until the creation of the Orphic mystery religion. In Roman mythology, she was called Necessitas ("necessity"). From Herodotus, The History Book Eight
Ananse Ashanti Creator of the sun, stars, day, moon and night who often intercedes between gods and mortals Ashanti
Ananse Ashanti Africa The creator of the sun, stars, day, moon & night who often intercedes between gods & mortals
Ananta Hindu/Puranic The world serpent in Hindu mythology. During the night of Brahma, Vishnu sleeps on coils of prodigious snake, Sesha, also known as Ananta, 'the endless' whose thousand heads rise above the deity like a canopy. This scene and everything in it, the deities’ serpentine couch, the water on which the snake lies, are all manifestations of the primeval essence. Hindu/Puranic
Anasuya Hindu That is, the charity, was wife of an ancient Indian rishi (sage) named Atri. In the Ramayana, she appears living with her husband in a small hermitage in the southern periphery of the forest of Chitrakuta. She was very pious, and always practiced austerities and devotion. Hindu
Anat Hebrew / Israel The goddess ‘Anat is never mentioned in Hebrew scriptures as a goddess, though her name is apparently preserved in the city names Beth Anath and Anathoth. Anathoth seems to be a plural form of the name, perhaps a shortening of bкt ‘anatфt 'House of the ‘Anats', either a reference to many shrines of the goddess or a plural of intensification. The ancient hero Shamgar son of ‘Anat is mentioned in Judges 3.31;5:6 which raises the idea that this hero may have been imagined as a demi-god, a mortal son of the goddess.
Anat / Athene Greek Anat and Athene In a Cyprian inscription the Greek goddess Athкna Sфteira Nikк is equated with ‘Anat. Anat is also presumably the goddess whom Sanchuniathon calls Athene, a daughter of El, mother unnamed, who with Hermes (that is Anubis) councelled El on the making of a sickle and a spear of iron, presumably to use against his father Uranus. However, in the Baal cycle, that rфle is assigned to Asherah / Elat and Anat is there called the "Virgin."
Anat in Egypt Egypt Anat first appears in Egypt in the 16th dynasty (the Hyksos period) along with other northwest Semitic deities. She was especially worshipped in her aspect of a war goddess, often paired with the goddess ‘Ashtart. In the Contest Between Horus and Set, these two goddesses appear as daughters of Re and are given in marriage to the god Set, who had been identified with the Semitic god Hadad.
Anat in Mesopotamia Akkadian In Akkadian the form one would expect ‘Anat to take would be Antu earlier Antum. This would also be the normal femanine form that would be taken by Anu, the Akkadian form of An 'Sky', the Sumerian god of heaven. Antu appears in Akkadian texts mostly as a rather colorless consort of Anu, the mother of Ishtar in the Gilgamesh story, but is also identified with the northwest Semitic goddess ‘Anat of essentially the same name. It is unknown whether this is an equation of two originally separate goddesses whose names happened to fall together or whether ‘Anat's cult spread to Mesopotamia where she came to be worshippped as Anu's spouse because the Mesopotamia form of her name suggested she was a counterpart to Anu.
Anaxibia Greek 1. A daughter of Bias and wife of Pelias, by whom she became the mother of Acastus, Peisidice, Pelopia, Hippothoe, and Alcestis. (Apollodorus) 2. A daughter of Cratieus, and second wife of Nestor. (Apollodorus) 3. A daughter of Pleisthenes, and sister of Agamemnon, married Strophius and became the mother of Pylades.
Ancasta Britain / British A Goddess who survives only in her name through an inscription on a stone in Hampshire. It is a possibility she is related to Andraste. Britain
Andhrimner Norse The cook in Valhalla. Norse
Andjety Egypt An underworld god of the ninth nome[district]
Andromache Greek A daughter of Eetion, king of the Cilician Thebae, and one of the noblest and most amiable female characters in the Iliad. Her father and her seven brothers were slain by Achilles at the taking of Thebae, and her mother, who had purchased her freedom by a large ransom, was killed by Artemis. Greek
Andromeda Greek The daughter of Cepheus and Cassiopeia. Mother thought she and daughter were more beautiful than any of Poseidon's many nymphs, and she taunted the God of the Seas until he just couldn't take it any longer. Poseidon punished the vain mother by chaining her daughter naked to a rock, to be sacrificed to a dreadful sea monster. Greek
Andvare-Force Norse The force or waterfall in which the dwarf Andvare kept himself in the form of a pike fish. Norse
Andvarenaut Norse The fatal ring given Andvare (the wary spirit). Norse
Andvari Norse Andvare, The name of a pike-shaped dwarf; the owner of the fatal ring called Andvaranautr. Norse
Anextiomarus Roman/British A Celtic epithet of the sun-god Apollo recorded in a Romano-British inscription from South Shields, England. The form is a variant of Anextlomarus 'Great protector', a divine style or name attested in a fragmentary Gallo-Roman dedication from Le Mans, France. Anextlomarus is also attested as a Gaulish man's father's name at Langres, and a feminine divine form, Anextlomara, appears in two other Gallo-Roman dedications from Avenches, Switzerland. Roman/British
Angels Christian/Jewish/Islam Messengers between the heaven and earth, with nine orders at present. Christian/Jewish/Islam
Angels Greek Geniel, Enediel, Anixiel, Azariel, Gabriel, Dirachiel, Scheliel, Amnediel, Barbiel, Ardefiel, Neciel, Abdizuel, Jazeriel, Ergediel, Atliel, Azeruel, Adriel, Egibiel, Amutiel, Kyriel, Bethnael, Geliel, Requiel, Abrinael, Agiel, Tagriel, Atheniel, Amnixiel - Angels of the Mansions of the Moon. There are twenty-eight angels, who rule in the twenty-eight mansions of the moon.
Angels of Vengeance Greek Twelve angels among the first formed at Creation, although according to official Catholic doctrine, all angels were formed simultaneously. Only five are mentioned by name: Saten'el, Michael, Uriel, Rappheal and Nathan'el.
Angelus Greek A surname of Artemis, according to some accounts the original name of Hecate.
Angerboda Norse [Anguish-creating]. A giantess; mother of the Fenris-wolf by Loke. Norse.
Angerona Roman Goddess of anguish, secrecy, silence and the winter solstice. According to one class of passages she is the goddess of anguish and fear, that is, the goddess who not only produces this state of mind, but also relieves men from it. Roman
Angeyja Norse One of Heimdal's nine mothers. The Elder Edda says in the Lay of Hyndla : Nine giant maids gave birth to the gracious god, at the world's margin. These are: Gjalp, Greip, Eistla, Angeyja, Ulfrun, Eyrgjafa, Imd, Atla, and Jarnsaxa. Norse.
Angitia Greek Taught the people remedies against the poison of serpents, and had derived her name from being able to kill serpents by her incantations. Greek
Angoulaffre French Angoulaffre of the Broken Teeth. His face measured 3 feet across; his nose was 9 inches long; his arms and legs were each 6 feet; his fingers 6 inches and 2 lines; his enormous mouth was armed with sharp pointed yellow tusks. He was descended from Goliath. French
Angpoi Unnax Enochian The Divine name ruling life, the universe and everything else. Enochian
Angru Mainya . Angra Mainya Persia Angru Mainya aka Angra Mainya, another name for Ahriman the chief antagonist of Ahura Mazdah. Persia
Angurvadel Norse Frithiof's sword, inscribed with Runic letters, which blazed in time of war, but gleamed with a dim light in time of peace. Norse
Angwusnasomtaka Hopi A kachina, a spirit represented by a masked doll (also called a kachina). She is a wuya, one of the chief kachinas and is considered the mother of all the hъ and all the kachinas. She led the initiation rites for new children, whipping them with yucca whips. Hopi
Anhur Egypt Aka Anher, Anhert. Official God of the nome Abt and its capital. Rules over War, Sun and the sky. Egypt.
Anigrides Greek The nymphs of the river Anigrus in Elis.
Anila Hindu/Puranic One of the Vasus, gods of the elements of the cosmos. He is equated with the wind god Vayu, Anila being understood as the name normally used for Vayu when numbered among the Vasus. Hindu/Puranic
Animisha Indian "One who does not wink", a general epithet of all Indian gods.
Anitor Eastern By the virtue of these most holy Angelic Names do I clothe myself, O Lord, in my Sabbath garments, that so I may fulfil, even unto their term, all things which I desire to effect through Thee, Most Holy ADONAY, Whose kingdom and rule endure for ever and ever. Amen. From the Key of Solomon
Anna Kuari India/Oraon Local vegetation goddess who can give good crops and make a man rich, but to induce her to do so it is necessary to offer human sacrifices. India/Oraon
Annar or Onarr Norse Husband of night and father of Jord (the earth). Norse
Annis . Black Anna, Black Anny, Black Agnes, Cat Anna Britain/Celtic Annis aka Black Anna, Black Anny, Black Agnes, Cat Anna, Leicester witch with very sharp nails who wore a skirt made from the skins of her human prey. Britain/Celtic
Anqet Egypt/Libya Aka Anuket, Anukis, "The Clasper." Water Goddess of the Nile Cataracts. Her symbal was the cowrie shell. Pictured as a woman donning a tall plumed crown. Also has been depicted as having four arms. Rules Over: Producer and giver of life, water. Egypt/Libya
Anshur aka Ashur Akkadian Or Asshur, a sky god and the husband of his sister Kishar ("earth axle"); they are the children of the serpents Lahmu and Lahamu, and the parents of Anu and Ea. He is sometimes depicted as having Ninlil as a consort. As Anshar, he is progenitor of the Akkadian pantheon; as Ashur, he is the head of the Assyrian pantheon
Anshur/ Ashur/ Asshur Assyria Not only be goddess of the sun, but it was the that killed the dragon of chaos during creation
Antimachus Greek A Trojan, who, when Menelaus and Odysseus came to Troy to ask for the surrender of Helen, advised his countrymen to put the ambassadors to death. It was Antimachus who principally insisted upon Helen not being restored to the Greeks. He had three sons, and when two of them, Peisander and Hippolochus, fell into the hands of Menelaus, they were both put to death.
Antiope Greece A daughter of Nycteus and Polyxo or of the river god Asopus in Boeotia. She became by Zeus the mother of Amphion and Zethus, Dionysus threw her into a state of madness on account of the vengeance which her sons had taken on Dirce. In this condition she wandered about through Greece, until Phocus, the grandson of Sisyphus, cured and married her. She was buried with Phocus in one common tomb.
Anukis Egypt Birth goddess and of the cataracts of the lower Nile. Egypt
Anumati Sanskrit A lunar deity and goddess of wealth, intellect, children, spirituality and prosperity. Also Anumati is a type of full moon day in which the moon remains slightly cut and not fully full moon called as Chaturdashi bhiddha purnima Sanskrit
Anunit aka Anunitu Chaldea The Assyrian and Babylonian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess Astarte. Anunit, Astarte and Atarsamain are alternative names for Ishtar. Chaldea
Aon Greek A son of Poseidon, and an ancient Boeotian hero, from whom the Boeotian Aonians and the country of Boeotia (for Boeotia was anciently called Aonia) were believed to have derived their names.
Aondo Africa Creator god who lives in the sky and sends the sun each morning. Central Nigeria, West Africa
Aondo Tiv Nigeria The creator god that lives in the sky