8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Origin" - 261 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
Supreme god name
"AME-NO-MINAKA-NUSHI-NOKAMI"
Shinto / Japan Supreme god. he highest deity of the Shinto pantheon and the first to emerge in Takama-No-Hara (the plain of high heaven) when heaven and earth were fashioned. He was born alone, resides in the ninth heaven and has always hidden himself from mortal eyes. A remote and vague figure of whom no images are ever made and toward whom no cult is directed. His name only appears once in the Kojiki and never in the Nihongi. Originally his identity may have been strongly influenced by Chinese religion. His name is linked closely with those of two other lesser primordial beings, TAKA-MI-MISUBI-NO-KAMI and KAMI-MISUBI-NO-KAMI....
Goddess name
"ATTIS"
Phrygia / northwestern Turkey vegetation god. Attis is a “dying and rising” fertility god modeled on the Mesopotamian DUMUZI. He is considered to have originated as a shepherd. In alternative traditions, KYBELE, the “great mother,” is either his mother or purely his consort. Another legend suggests he was conceived immaculately by the demigoddess NANA when she placed a ripe almond in her bosom....
Deities name
"Adibuddha (the primeval buddha)"
Buddhist The original BUDDHA. The primordial force in the cosmos from whom the five DHYANIBUDDHAS arose. The embodiment of the concept of emptiness. He is considered by some authorities to be identical with Vaharaja and Vajrasattva. His image, sitting on a lotus leaf, is often carried by other Buddhist deities. Epithets include Svabhava (self-creating), Svayambhu (self-enlightened)....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

"Aegis"
Greek In Homer, is the shield or buckler of Zeus, fashioned for him by Hephaestus, furnished with tåśśels and bearing the Gorgon's head in the centre. Originally symbolic of the storm-cloud, it is probably derived from aisso, signifying rapid, violent motion.
King name
"Aepytus"
Greek One of the mythical kings of Arcadia. He was the son of Eilatus and originally ruled over Phaesana on the Alpheius in Arcadia. When Cleitor, the son of Azan, died without leaving any issue, Aepytus succeeded him and became king of the Arcadians, a part of whose country was called after him Aepytis.
Goddess name
"Aericura aka Erecura"
Roman / Celtic Herecura, Eracura, was a goddess worshipped in ancient times, often thought to be Celtic in origin, mostly represented with the attributes of Proserpina and åśśociated with the Roman underworld god Dis Pater. Roman / Celtic
Spirit name
"Agathos Daimon (good demon)"
Greco - Roman God of fortune. Known locally from Alexandria and depicted in the form of a snake. May have originated as an androgynous fertility spirit, but later becomes identified as the consort of Agathe Tyche (see TYCHE). Libations were made regularly to this deity after meals and he was regarded as a friendly household guardian....
God name
"Ahriman"
Zoroastrian / Farsi Per sian Chthonic god of darkness. The antagonist of AHURA MAZDA, god of light, and his attendant, MITHRA. The name is a modern derivation of the original Avestan title ANGRU MAINYU. Ahriman is said to have tried to persuade his attendant animals, including the scor pion, ant and snake, to drink the blood of the bull slain by Mithra in the primeval legend of dualistic conflict (see Mithra); if he had succeeded he would have prevented life from forming on earth. In another legend he tried to thwart Ahura Mazda by sending a flood to destroy the world. Also recog nized in Roman Mithraism. Rituals included ani mal sacrifice. Also ARIMANIUS (Roman)....
Supreme god name
"Ai Apaec"
Mochica Indian / pre - Columbian South America / northern coast of Peru Supreme god. Probably originated as a jaguar god but came to rule the destinies of the world. He was thought to live like ordinary people and could reveal himself as man or god at will. He is depicted in anthropomorphic form, but with huge fangs and a cat-like wrinkled face with whiskers coming from his nose. He received sacrificial victims hurled from the top of a high cliff....
God name
"Aizen-Myo-o"
Japan / Shinto The god of love and lust. Originally a Hindu deity, Ragaraja, Aizen Myo-o became part of Buddhism, and Kobo Daishi Kukai transmitted the teaching of him to Japan. Japan / Shinto
Goddess name
"Alphito"
Greek the White Goddess, originally the Danaan Barley-goddess of Argos. Greek
God name
"Ambisagrus aka Bussumarus"
Britain Originally from Gaul, where his Celtic identity was lost during the Roman takeover where he took all the characteristics of the Roman God Jupiter. weather deity who controlled the Rain, wind, hail and fog. Britain

"Ammon"
Africa Originally an Aethiopian or Libyan divinity, whose worship subsequently spread all over Egypt, parts of Africa, and many parts of Greece. The real Egyptian name was Amun or Ammun.
Goddess name
"Anat in Mesopotamia"
Akkadian In Akkadian the form one would expect ‘Anat to take would be Antu earlier Antum. This would also be the normal femanine form that would be taken by Anu, the Akkadian form of An 'Sky', the Sumerian god of heaven. Antu appears in Akkadian texts mostly as a rather colorless consort of Anu, the mother of Ishtar in the Gilgamesh story, but is also identified with the northwest Semitic goddess ‘Anat of essentially the same name. It is unknown whether this is an equation of two originally separate goddesses whose names happened to fall together or whether ‘Anat's cult spread to Mesopotamia where she came to be worshippped as Anu's spouse because the Mesopotamia form of her name suggested she was a counterpart to Anu.

"Angelus"
Greek A surname of Artemis, according to some accounts the original name of Hecate.
God name
"Angru Mainyu (evil spirit)"
Persian / Iran Chthonic underworld god of darkness. The original Zoroastrian name of the chief antagonist of AHURA MAZDA.See also AHRIMAN....
Goddess name
"Anunnaki"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian Children and courtiers of the god of heaven. Known from at least 2500 BC until circa 200BC (in Babylon). The Anunnaki originate as chthonic fertility deities but later feature as the seven fearsome judges of the underworld who answer to Kur and ERES KIGAL and who are responsible for påśśing sentences of death including that placed on the goddess INANA. They are often closely identified with the IGIGI....

"Aphaea"
Greek Aka Britomartis, appears to have originally been a Cretan divinity of hunters and fishermen. Her name is usually derived from sweet or blessing, and a maiden, so that the name would mean, the sweet or blessing maiden. Greek
Deities name
"Arapacana"
Buddhist God. A BODHISATTVA or spiritual meditation buddha. Originally a DHARANI of MANJUSRI who became deified. Accompanied by four minor deities. Also a collective name for the five buddhas. Color: yellow or red. Attributes: standing wearing a monkish garment and carrying Book and sword....
Goddess name
"Arduinna"
Roman / Celtic Goddess of the Ardennes Forest. Her cult thus originated in the Ardennes, which derived its name from her. She was åśśimilated to the Roman Diana. Roman / Celtic
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.