8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Origin" - 261 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Boreas"
Greek / also Roman God of the north wind. He controlled the storm which destroyed the Persian fleet sailing against Athens. Identified with Winter frosts. According to the Theogony (Hesiod), he is the son of EOS and Astraeos and is of Thracian origin: “ . . . when Thracian Boreas huddles the thick clouds.”...

"Britomartis"
Greek Appears to have originally been a Cretan divinity of hunters and fishermen. Her name is usually derived from sweet or blessing, and a maiden, so that the name would mean, the sweet or blessing maiden. Greek

"Butsugen aka Butsubo"
Japan A manifestation of the eyes of Nyorai. eyes originally has infinite virtue to produce wisdom. Japan
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"COVENTINA"
Roman / Celtic / British Tutelary and water goddess of uncertain affinities. Little is known of Coventina other than that she was a purely local British goddess of some importance. She is best observed from the period of the Roman occupation, at which time she shows a clåśśical influence but is clearly Celtic in origin....

"Calpe"
Roman Calpe and Abyla. The two pillars of Hercules. According to one account, these two were originally only one mountain, which Hercules tore asunder; but some say he piled up each mountain separately, and poured the sea between them. Roman
Goddess name
"Caolainn"
Origin Goddess who was the guardian of a magical well in County Roscommon in western Ireland Her myth is the origin of the 'wishing well'
Goddess name
"Carravogue"
British / Ireland Local Crone Goddess from County Meath who was transformed into a huge snake for eating forbidden berries. Her original purpose is basically lost in modern times because her stories became so absorbed by Christian legends which attempt to make her a Celtic Eve. British / Ireland
God name
"Chac"
Mayan / Yucatec, Mesoamerican / Mexico Rain god(s). Not part of the hierarchy of Mayan gods, but worshiped with great devotion at local level. Originally there was a god, Chaac, who was of huge size and who taught mankind Agriculture. He was regarded as the god of thunder, lightning, Rain and bread, and of milpas (smallholdings) and their produce. Also God B....
Monster name
"Chimaera"
Greek A fire-breathing monster, which, according to the Homeric poems, was of Divine origin. Greek

"Chloris"
Greek A daughter of the Theban Amphion and Niobe. According to an Argive tradition, her original name was Meliboea, and she and her brother Amyclas were the only children of Niobe that were not killed by Apollo and Artemis. But the terror of Chloris at the death of her brothers and sisters was so great, that she turned perfectly white, and was therefore called Chloris. Greek
Demon name
"Chung K'uei"
Taoist / Chinese God of the afterlife. He belongs to the heavenly “ministry of exorcism” and, though not the most senior (he is subservient to CHANG TAO LING), is probably the most popular within the category. He was originally a mortal working as a physician in the eighth century AD. He is depicted with a fearsome face, said to be so terrible that it can drive away any demonic spirit who dares to oppose him. He is engaged in combat using a sword and a fan on which is written a magical formula to ward off evil. Symbolic peaches are suspended from his hat and a bat circles his head representing happiness....
Goddess name
"Coventina"
Celtic One of the most potent of the Celtic river Goddesses. Most likely Roman in origin. She was also the Goddess of featherless flying creatures.
King name
"Creiddylad"
Welsh Originally betrothed to Gwythr ap Greidawl, she is abducted by Gwyn ap Nudd, causing the two rivals to go to war over her. In the early Arthurian tale Culhwch and Olwen, king Arthur settles the feud by arranging for the two to battle every May Day until Doomsday. Welsh
God name
"DARARIA"
Hindu / India Jjustice. The god of law who originates as a creator god and one of the sons of Brahma, but almost certainly derives from the dharmas or archetypal patterns of society identified in the Rg Veda. According to tradition he is the consort of thirteen daughters of DAKSA and the father of Yudhisthra. Also regarded as a minor avatara of VISNU, appearing as a bull standing for the redemption of souls....
God name
"Daikokr"
Shinto / Japan God of luck. One of seven gods of fortune in Shintoism and often linked with the god EBISU. Originally a god of kitchens, he became a deity concerned with happiness. He is depicted as a fat, well-to-do figure seated on two rice bales and carrying a sack on his back. He also holds a hammer in his right hand. In depictions there is often a mouse nibbling at one of the rice bales. Small gold icons of the god may be carried as talismans of wealth. According to tradition, when Daikoku's hammer is shaken, money falls out in great profusion. In western Japan he is also syncretized with the god of rice paddies, TA-NO-KAMI, and thus becomes the god of Agriculture and farmers. He may have developed from the Buddhist god MAHAKALA....
God name
"Daramulum"
Australian aboriginal Creator god. Otherwise known as Gayandi he is the son of BAIAME and BIRRAHGNOOLOO and is worshiped principally by the Wiradyuri and Kamilaroi groups of aborigines in the southeast of Australia, who regard him as an intermediary between his father, the supreme being, and the human race. To an extent this role may have developed through Christian missionary influence....
Demon name
"Darawigal"
Australian aboriginal Personification of evil. This demonic deity stands opposed to BAIAME, the creator spirit who represents good in the world. He is generally recognized as an offspring of Baiame who once lived in the sky but fell from grace during the Dreamtime and was sent to the underworld as its ruler. From there he now dispenses death and sickness....

"Delias"
Greek The sacred vessel made by Theseus and sent annually from Athens to Delos. This annual festival lasted 30 days, during which no Athenian could be put to death, and as Socrates was condemned during this period his death was deferred till the return of the sacred vessel. The ship had been so often repaired that not a stick of the original vessel remained at the time, yet was it the identical ship. So the body changes from infancy to old age, and though no single particle remains constant, yet the man 6 feet high is identical with his infant body a span long. Greek

"Deo"
Hindu Originally the term for the thirty-three great divinities. Hindu
Deities name
"Deva (the god)"
Hindu / Vedic / Puranic Generic name of a god. Originally, in the Rg Veda, thirty or thirty-three devas are indicated, divided into three groups of eleven. In later Hinduism, the term deva is generally applied to deities not included in the chief triad of BRAHMA, VISNU and SIVA....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.