8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Phrygia" - 46 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼

"Bagaios"
Asia Minor The Phrygian equivalent of Zeus. Asia Minor
God name
"Bagos Papaios"
Asia Minor A Phrygian sky god. Asia Minor
Deities name
"Alcis"
Germanic / possibly Icelandic / Nordic Unknown status. The Alcis are twin deities (brothers) known only as sons of the sky gods. From Germanic times we have a La Tene urn with pictures of paired men on horseback and linked by a wooden beam. Tacitus describes the worship of twin gods by the Naharvali tribe, their priests dressed in effeminate costume (see also the Phrygian deity ATTIS). They may have been worshiped in Forest sanctuaries along the northern coast of Europe....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

"Adamas"
Gnostic Christian / Nassene Primordial creator being. Recognized locally in Phrygia [northwestern Turkey] as an androgynous force in the cosmos....
God name
"Priapos"
Greco - Roman / Phrygian Fertility god. The son of DIONYSOS and APHRODITE, he was also a guardian of mariners. Priapos was not regarded as a significant deity in Greece until very late times—during the Macedonian period, circa fourth to second century BC—and was only locally popular during the Roman Empire period. He is particularly known from Phrygia and is depicted as a satyr-like creature with pronounced genitals....
Goddess name
"Semele (earth)"
Greco - Roman but probably of Thracian or Phrygian origin Mother goddess. According to legend she was the mortal daughter of Cadmos and became the mother of the god DIONYSOS (BACCHUS) after a brief liaison with ZEUS (JUPITER), also in mortal guise. Semele was burned to death on Olympus, unable to withstand the presence of Zeus in godly form, but was subsequently deified by him....
King name
"Dactyls"
Greek The Dactyls of mount Ida in Phrygia, fabulous beings to whom the discovery of iron and the art of working it by means of fire was ascribed. Their name Dactyls, that is, Fingers, is accounted for in various ways; by their number being five or ten, or by the fact of their serving Rhea just as the fingers serve the hand, or by the story of their having lived at the foot of mount Ida. Greek
Nymph name
"Daphnis"
Greek A Sicilian hero, to whom the invention of bucolic poetry is ascribed. He is called a son of Hermes by a nymph, or merely the beloved of Hermes. Ovid calls him an Idaean shepherd; but it does not follow from this that Ovid connected him with either the Phrygian or the Cretan Ida, since Ida signifies any woody mountain. Greek
God name
"Hecabe"
Greek Or in Latin Hecuba, a daughter of Dymas in Phrygia, and second wife of Priam, king of Troy. Some described her as a daughter of Cisseus, or the Phrygian river-god Sangarius and Metope. Greek

"Iacchus"
Greek The solemn name of the mystic Bacchus at Athens and Eleusis. The Phrygian Bacchus was looked upon in the Eleusinian mysteries as a child, and as such he is described as the son of Demeter and Zeus, and as the brother of Cora, that is, the male Cora or Corus.

"Idaeus"
Greek A son of Dardåñuś and Chryse, and brother of Deimas, went with his father from Peloponnesus, by way of Samothrace, to Phrygia, and settled on the mountains of Phrygia, which derived from him the name of Ida, or the Idaean mountains.Greek
Deities name
"Kabiri"
Greek deities and very mysterious gods with the ancient nations, including the Israelites, and were held in the highest veneration at Thebes, Lemnos, Phrygia, Macedonia, and at Samothrace.

"Linden Tree"
Greek Baucis was converted into a linden tree. Philemon and Baucis were poor cottagers of Phrygia, who entertained Jupiter so hospitably that he promised to grant them whatever request they made. They asked that both might die together, and it was so. At death Philemon became an oak and Baucis a linden tree. Their branches intertwined at the top. Greek

"Lityerses"
Greek Lived in Phrygia, engaged in rural pursuits, and hospitably received all strangers that påśśed his house, but he then compelled them to åśśist him in the harvest, and whenever they allowed themselves to be surpåśśed by him in their work, he cut off their heads in the evening, and concealed their bodies in the sheaves, accompanying his deed with songs. Heracles, however, slew him, and threw his body into the Maeander. Greek
King name
"Midas"
Greek A son of Gordius by Cybele, a wealthy but effeminate king of Phrygia, a pupil of Orpheus, and a promoter of the worship of Dionysus. His wealth is alluded to in a story connected with his childhood, for it is said that while yet a child, ants carried grains of wheat into his mouth to indicate that one day he should be the richest of all mortals. Greek
King name
"Midas-eared"
Greek Without discrimination or judgment. Midas, king of Phrygia, was appointed to judge a musical contest between Apollo and Pan, and gave judgment in favour of the satyr; whereupon Apollo in contempt gave the king a pair of åśś's ears. Midas hid them under his Phrygian cap; out his servant, who used to cut his hair, discovered them, and was so tickled at the "joke," which he durst not mention, that he dug a hole in the earth, and relieved his mind by whispering in it "Midas has åśś's ears." Greek
Nymph name
"Nana"
Greek A nymph of Sangarius, a river located in present-day Turkey. She became pregnant when an almond from an almond tree fell on her lap. The almond tree had sprung where Agdistis, a mythical being connected with the Phrygian worship of Attes, was slain. Agdistis was a son of Cybele, the Mother of all things. Nana abandoned the baby, who was adopted by his grandmother, Cybele. The baby, Attis, grew up to become Cybele's servant and lover. Greek
King name
"Otreus"
Greek A king of Phrygia, whom Priam åśśisted against the Amazons. Greek
God name
"Sangarius"
Greek A river-god, is described as the son of Oceåñuś and Tethys, and as the husband of Metope, by whom he became the father of Hecabe. The river Sangarius (in Phrygia) itself is said to have derived its name from one Sangas, who had offended Rhea, and was punished lay her by being changed into water. Greek
King name
"Tros"
Greek 1. A son of Erichthonius and Astyoclie, and a grandson of Dardåñuś. He was married to Calirrhoe, by whom he became the father of Ilus, Assaracus and Ganymedes, and was king of Phrygia. The country and people of Troy derived their name from him. He gave up his son Ganymedes to Zeus for a present of horses.
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.