8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Polynesia" - 153 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
Deities name
"Anu-Mate"
Polynesian God of space. One of the sons of RANGINUI by Pokoharua, the sister of TANGAROA, the sea god. He belongs to a group of deities engendered at the time of creation that includes ANU-MATE, Anu-Matao, Anu-Whakarere and Anu-Whakatoro, all of whom rule over different aspects of space above the upper world. AnuMate is perceived as the god responsible for the “space of cold death” and in fact all of the group are envisaged as deities ruling over realms of great cold....
God name
"Savea Si'uleo"
Polynesia God of the dead Polynesia
God name
"Fe'e"
Polynesian God of the dead. Perceived as a giant cuttlefish who was once subdued by the god of deep underground rocks. Part of the principle of Polynesian religion that every deity has a superior and and inferior who have either bested, or been bested by, the other at some mythical time....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Savea Si'uleo"
Polynesian God of the dead. The brother of SALEVAO, god of rocks....
God name
"Tinirau"
Polynesia God of the ocean Polynesia
God name
"Raka"
Polynesia God of the winds. Polynesia
Goddess name
"Ruamoko"
Polynesian / Maori God of volcanoes and earthquakes. According to tradition, Ruamoko is the youngest son of RANGINUI and PAPATUANUXU and is possessed by a formidable temper. When his older siblings set about separating the prime parents from their eternal lovemaking in order to allow light into the space between sky and earth, he was enraged and his boisterous tantrum became revealed in the violence of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Ruamoko is of less importance than PELE, the chief volcano goddess of Polynesia, who is revered mainly in Hawaii....
God name
"Tumatauenga"
Polynesia God of war who was given charge over mankind. Polynesia
God name
"Tumatauenga"
Polynesian / including Maori God of war. One of the children of the prime parents RANGINUI and PAPATUANUKU, he proposed the slaughter of his parents when it was decided to separate them as sky and earth. He was subsequently given charge over mankind (tangata), which he imbued with his lust for the warfare and violence that was a characteristic part of Maori culture. Also Kumatauenga (Hawaiian)....
Demon name
"Maru"
Polynesian / Maori God of war. One of the important deities revered by Maori clans in New Zealand in times of war, he may be represented in totems as an aggressive face with a prominent tuft of hair, staring eyes and tongue protruding, though these totems generally represent ancestors rather than deities. Maru may be invoked in the familiar Maori war dances and chants demonstrated popularly by the All Blacks before rugby matches all over the world....
God name
"Oro"
Polynesian / Tahiti God of war. One of the sons of TANGAROA....
God name
"Kuklikimoku"
Polynesia God of war. Polynesia
Deities name
"Hanui-o-Rangi (fatber of winds)"
Polynesian God of winds and weather. He is the son of the sky god RANGINUI, who fathered him on one of his early consorts, Pokoharua, the sister of TANGAROA, the sea god. All the subsequent descendants of Hanui-o-Rangi are believed to rule over various aspects of the weather. Hanui thus fathered Tawhiri, the god of the northwest wind, whose son was Tiu. They control the fierce storms from the east. The children of Tiu include Hine-I-Tapapauta and Hine-Tu-Whenua, the deities overseeing the more gentle westerly winds. Hine-Tu-Whenua is the mother of Hakona-Tipu and Pua-I-Taha, controlling the southern and southwesterly gales....
Deities name
"Tawhirimatea"
Polynesian / including Maori God of winds. One of the children of the prime parents RANGINUI and PAPATUANUKU. He was uniquely opposed to the separation of his mother and father, sky and earth, at the time of the creation of the cosmos, and in consequence spends his time haråśśing and troubling mankind. In Maori culture Papatuanuku, like all deities, is represented only by inconspicuous, slightly worked stones or pieces of wood and not by the large totems, which are depictions of ancestors....
Goddess name
"Raka (trouble) (2)"
Polynesian / Hervey Islands God of winds. The fifth child of VARI-MA-TE-TAKERE, the primordial mother. His home is Moana-Irakau (deep ocean). He received as a gift from his mother a great basket containing the winds, which became his children, each allotted a hole in the edge of the horizon through which to blow. The mother goddess also gave him knowledge of many useful things which he påśśes on to mankind....
God name
"Tango"
Polynesian / Hervey Islamds / The third child of the primordial mother VARI - MA - TETAKERE, he was plucked from her right side / lived in Enua - Kura, the land of the red parrot feather immediately below the home of TINIRAU in the world coconut God. Ta'ngwanla'na (greatest one in the sea)...
God name
"Tu-Metua (stick-by-parent)"
Polynesian / Hervey Islands God. The sixth child of VARI-MA-TE-TAKERE, the primordial mother. Torn from her right side, he stays with her in the confined space at the bottom of the world coconut and lives in endless silence....
Goddess name
"Taka rita"
Polynesia Goddess of adultery Polynesia
Goddess name
"Laka"
Polynesian / Hawaii Goddess of dancing. A minor deity who is nonetheless greatly revered by islanders in a hedonistic cult of song, dance and sexual liberality....
Goddess name
"Mahuika"
Polynesia Goddess of earthquakes who rules the edges of the underworld Polynesia
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.