8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Pre Greek" - 126 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Fates"
Greek Properly signifies "a share," and as a personification "the deity who åśśigns to every man his fate or his share," or the Fates. Homer usually speaks of only one Moira, and only once mentions the Motpai in the plural. In his poems Moira is fate personified, which, at the birth of man, spins out the thread of his future life, follows his steps, and directs the consequences of his actions according to the counsel of the gods. Homer thus, when he personifies Fate, conceives her as spinning, an act by which also the power of other gods over the life of man is expressed. Greek
Goddess name
"Gad"
Western Semitic / Punic / Carthaginian God of uncertain status. Probably concerned with chance or fortune and known from Palmyrene inscriptions, and from the Vetus Testamentum in place names such as Baal-Gad and Midal-Gad. Popular across a wide area of Syrio-Palestine and Anatolia in preBiblical times. Thought to have been syncretized ultimately with the Greek goddess TYCHE....

"Gamelii"
Greek The divinities protecting and presiding over marriage. Plutarch says, that those who married required the protection of five divinities: Zeus, Hera, Aphrodite, Peitho, and Artemis. Greek
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Hadad"
Western Semitic / Syrian / Phoenician weather god. Derived from the Akkadian deity ADAD. In texts found at the site of the ancient Canaanite capital of Ugarit [Ras Samra] , the name of Hadad apparently becomes a substitute for that of BAAL. His voice is described as roaring from the clouds and his weapon is the thunderbolt. His mother is the goddess ASERAH. During Hellenic times he was predominantly worshiped at Ptolemais and Hierapolis. His Syrian consort is ATARGATIS, who overshadowed him in local popularity at Hierapolis. Statues of the two deities were carried in procession to the sea twice yearly. According to the Jewish writer Josephus, Hadad also enjoyed a major cult following at Damascus in the eighth and ninth centuries BC. By the third century BC the Hadad-Atargatis cult had extended to Egypt, when he becomes identified as the god SUTEKH. In the Greek tradition his consort becomes HERA.See also ADAD....
God name
"Hades"
Greek Or Pluton, Pluto, Plouton, Dis (Roman), and Aidoneus, the god of the lower world; Plato observes that people preferred calling him Pluton (the giver of wealth) to pronouncing the dreaded name of Hades or Aides. Hence we find that in ordinary life and in the mysteries the name Pluton became generally established, while the poets preferred the ancient name Aides or the form Pluteus. Greek
God name
"Harmonia"
Greek A daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, or, according to others, of Zeus and Electra, the daughter of Atlas, in Samothrace. When Athena åśśigned to Cadmus the government of Thebes, Zeus gave him Harmoia for his wife, and all the gods of Olympus were present at the marriage. Cadmus on that day made her a present of a peplus and a necklace, which he had received either from Hephaestus or from Europa. Greek

"Harmonia's Robe"
Greek On the marriage of Harmonia, Vulcan, to avenge the infidelity of her mother, made the bride a present of a robe dyed in all sorts of crimes, which infused wickedness and impiety into all her offspring. Both Harmonia and Cadmos, after having suffered many misfortunes, and seen their children a sorrow to them, were changed into serpents. Greek
God name
"Harpocrates"
Greek The Greek form of the Egyptian god Har-pi-kruti (Horus the Child), made by the Greeks and Romans the god of silence. This arose from a pure misapprehension. It is an Egyptian god, and was represented with its "finger on its mouth," to indicate youth, but the Greeks thought it was a symbol of silence. Greek
Goddess name
"Harpokrates [Greek]"
Egypt Form of the god HORUS as a child. Generally depicted sitting on the knee of his mother, the goddess ISIS, often suckling at the left breast and wearing the juvenile side-lock of hair. He may also be invoked to ward off dangerous creatures and is åśśociated with crocodiles, snakes and scorpions. He is generally representative of the notion of a god-child, completing the union of two deities. Also Har-pa-khered (Egyptian)....
Hero name
"Heracles"
Greek The most celebrated of all the heroes of antiquity. The traditions about him are not only the richest in substance, but also the most widely spread for we find them not only in all the countries round the Mediterranean, but his wondrous deeds were known in the most distant countries of the ancient world.
God name
"Hermanubis"
Egyptian A god who combined Hermes with Anubis. He was popular during the period of Roman domination. Depicted as having a human body and jackal head, with the sacred caduceus that belonged to the Greek god Hermes, he represented the Egyptian priesthood.

"Hermaphroditos"
Greek The name is compounded of Hermes and Aphrodite. He was originally a male Aphrodite (Aphroditus), and represented as a Hermes with the phallus, the symbol of fertility, but afterwards as a Divine being combining the two sexes, and usually with the head, breasts, and body of a female, but with the sexual parts of a man. Greek

"Himerus"
Greek The personification of longing love, is first mentioned by Hesiod, where he and Eros appear as the companions of Aphrodite. He is sometimes seen in works of art representing erotic circles and in the temple of Aphrodite at Megara, he was represented by Scopas, together with Eros and Pothus. Greek
Goddess name
"Hours"
Egypt underworld goddesses. The twelve daughters of the Sun god RE. They act in concert against the adversaries of Re and control the destiny of human beings in terms of each person's life span, reflecting the supremacy of order and time over chaos. The Hours are sometimes represented on the walls of royal tombs in anthropomorphic form with a five-pointed star above the head. Also Horae (Greek)....
God name
"Hyakinthos"
Greek God of vegetation. An ancient pre-Homeric deity known particularly from Amyklai (preDorian seat of kingship at Sparta). He is beloved by APOLLO who perversely kills him with a discus and changes him into a flower. At Amyklai the bronze of Apollo stands upon an altar-like pedestal said to be the grave of Hyakinthos and, prior to sacrifice being made to Apollo, offerings to Hyakinthos were påśśed through a bronze door in the pedestal....
God name
"Hyeeiioi"
Greek God of primordial light. A pre-Homeric deity, one of the race of TITANS whose consort is, according to some texts, THEA and who is the father of HELIOS and SELENE....
God name
"Hypnos"
Greek The personification and god of sleep, the Greek Hypnos, is described by the ancients as a brother of death and as a son of night. At Sicyon there was a statue of Sleep surnamed the giver. In works of art Sleep and death are represented alike as two youths sleeping or holding inverted torches in their hands. Greek
Supreme god name
"Hypsistos"
Hebrew / Greek The part of the Supreme Godhead that lets us understand the structure of nature from Infinity. Hebrew / Greek

"Iapis or Iapyx"
Greek Was a son of Iasus, and a favourite of Apollo, who wanted to confer upon him the gift of prophecy and the lyre, but Iapis, wishing to prolong the life of his father, preferred the more tranquil art of healing to all the others. He also cured Aeneas of the wound he had received in the war against La- tinus. Greek
God name
"Icarius"
Greek Also called Icarus and Icarion. An Athenian, who lived in the reign of Pandion, and hospitably received Dionysus on his arrival in Attica. The god showed him his gratitude by teaching him the cultivation of the vine, and giving him bags filled with wine. Icarius now rode about in a chariot, and distributed the precious gifts of the god; but some shepherds whom their friends intoxicated with wine, and who thought that they were poisoned by Icarius, slew him, and threw his body into the well Anygrus, or buried it under a tree. Greek
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.