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God Name and Meaning

List of Gods   : "Romans"

NameOriginDescription
Goddess name "Alruna-wife" German The Alrunes were the lares or penates of the ancient Romans. An Alruna-wife was the household goddess of a German family. An Alruna-maiden is a household maiden goddess.
Goddess name "Andraste" Roman war Goddess who was evoked on the eve of the battle to bring favor, and possibly ritual sacrifices were given to her. queen Boadicea of the Iceni offered sacrifieces to Andraste in a sacred grove before fighting the Romans on her many compaigns against them.
God name "Artaius" Celtic God of sheep and cattle herders from Celtic Gaul. Later, the Romans identified him with Mercury.
Goddess name "Atargatis" Asia Minor "Ocean Mermaid" a Goddess of Creation and Fertility. She was usually depicted with a fish tail; hence her modern identification as the Mermaid Goddess Known to the Romans as Dea Syria. She was worshipped by men performing auto-castration. Asia Minor
God name "Bacchus" Greek The youthful, beautiful, but effeminate god of wine. He is also called both by Greeks and Romans Dionysus.
"Barbata" Roman The bearded, a surname of Venus among the Romans.
Goddess name "Bellona" Greek The goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. Greek
Goddess name "Bellona" Roman Goddess of war and mother goddess Roman the goddess of war among the Romans. It is very probable that originally Bellona was a Sabine divinity whose worship was carried to Rome by the Sabine settlers. She is frequently mentioned by the Roman poets as the companion of Mars, or even as his sister or his wife. Virgil describes her as armed with a bloody scourge. (The Aeneid Book VIII)
"Cephalus" Greek A Molossian chief, who, together with another chief, Antinous, was driven by the calumnies of Charops to take the side of Perseus, in self-defence, against the Romans. Greek
"Dardanus" Greek A son of Zeus and Electra, the daughter of Atlas. He was the brother of Jasus, Jasius, Jason, or Jasion, Aetion and Harmonia, and his native place in the various traditions is Arcadia, Crete, Troas, or Italy. Dardanus is the mythical ancestor of the Trojans, and through them of the Romans. It is necessary to distinguish between the earlier Greek legends and the later ones which we meet with in the poetry of Italy. Greek
Goddess name "Despoena" Greek 1. A goddess of fruit. A daughter of Demeter and Poseidon. Known as Pomona to the Romans 2. The ruling goddess or the mistress, occurs as a surname of several divinities, such as Aphrodite, Demeter and Persephone. Greek
"Deverra" Roman One of the three symbolic beings, Pilumnus, Intercidona, and Deverra, whose influence was sought by the Romans at the birth of a child, as a protection for the mother against the vexations of Sylvanus. Roman
God name "Dionysus" Greek The youthful, beautiful, but effeminate god of wine. He is also called both by Greeks and Romans Bacchus, that is, the noisy or riotous god, which was originally a mere epithet or surname of Dionysus, but does not occur till after the time of Herodotus. Greek
"Erinnyes" Greek Erinnyes, Eumenides or Erinys (the Romans called them the Furies) were female personifications of vengeance. When a formulaic oath in the Iliad invokes "those who beneath the earth punish whoever has sworn a false oath" - "the Erinyes are simply an embodiment of the act of self-cursing contained in the oath" Greek
Goddess name "Faun" Roman Place-spirits (genii) of untamed woodland. Romans connected their fauns with the Greek satyrs, wild and orgiastic drunken followers of Dionysus. However, fauns and satyrs were originally quite different creatures. Both have horns and both resemble goats below the waist, humans above; but originally satyrs had human feet, fauns goatlike hooves. The Romans also had a god named Faunus and a goddess Fauna, who, like the fauns, were goat-people. Roman
Goddess name "Flora" Roman Goddess of gardens, plants, flowers, love, prostitution,spring and youth. Her festival was celebrated from the 28th of April till the first of May, with extravagant merriment and lasciviousness. The resemblance between the names Flora and Chloris led the later Romans to identify the two divinities. Roman
God name "Harpocrates" Greek The Greek form of the Egyptian god Har-pi-kruti (Horus the Child), made by the Greeks and Romans the god of silence. This arose from a pure misapprehension. It is an Egyptian god, and was represented with its "finger on its mouth," to indicate youth, but the Greeks thought it was a symbol of silence. Greek
God name "Hephaestus" Greek The god of fire, was, according to the Homeric account, the son of Zeus and Hera The Romans, when speaking of the Greek Hephaestus, call him Vulcan or Vulcanus, although Vulcanus was an original Italian divinity. Later traditions state that he had no father, and that Hera gave birth to him independent of Zeus, as she was jealous of Zeus having given birth to Athena independent of her. Greek
"Intercidona" Roman One of the Deverra, three symbolic beings whose influence was sought by the Romans, at the birth of a child, as a protection for the mother against the vexations of Sylvanus. Roman
Spirit name "Lemures" Greek Spectres or spirits of the dead, which were believed by the Romans to return to the upper world and injure the living. Some writers describe Lemures as the common name for all the spirits of the dead and divide all Lemures into two classes; viz. the souls of those who have been good men are said to become Lares, while those of the wicked become Larvae. Greek
Goddess name "Leucothea" Greek Leukothea. [White Goddess]. So Ino was called after she became a sea nymph. Her son Pal?mon, called by the Romans Portunus, or Portumnus, was the protecting genius of harbours. Greek
"Libitina" Italian An ancient Italian divinity, who was identified by the later Romans sometimes with Persephone on account of her connection with the dead and their burial, and sometimes with Aphrodite.
God name "Luna" Greek The moon. The Sun and the moon were worshipped both by Greeks and Romans, and among the latter the worship of Luna is said to have been introduced by the Sabine T. Tatius, in the time of Romulus. But, however this may be, it is certain, notwithstanding the assertion of Varro, that Sol and Luna were reckoned among the great gods, that their worship never occupied any prominent place in the religion of the Romans, for the two divinities had between them only a small chapel in the Via Sacra. Greek
Deity name "Ma" Comana A warlike deity identified by the Greeks with Enyo and by the Romans with Bellona. Comana
Spirit name "Manes" Greek I.e. "the good ones" [mana], is the general name by which the Romans designated the souls of the departed but as it is a natural tendency to consider the souls of departed friends as blessed spirits, the name of Lares is frequently used as synonymous with Manes, and hence also they are called dii Manes, and were worshipped with Divine honours. Greek
God name "Mars" Roman An ancient Roman god, who was at an early period identified by the Romans with the Greek Ares, or the god delighting in bloody war, although there are a variety of indications that the Italian Mars was originally a divinity of a very different nature. Roman
Spirit name "Mens" Roman I. e. mind, a personification of mind, worshipped by the Romans. She had a sanctuary on the Capitol. The object of her worship was that the citizens might always be guided by a right and just spirit. Roman
"Moneta" Roman A surname of Juno among the Romans, by which she was characterised as the protectress of money. Roman
God name "Murcury" Greek The name Mercury is connected with the root merx (merchandise) and mercari (to deal, trade). The early Romans, being above all countrymen, had no need for a god of commerce. The Roman Mercury appeared only about the fifth century BCE. and was exclusively the god of merchants. For long he was known only in this capacity so that Plautus, in his prologue to Amphitryon, reminds his audience that Mercury presided over messages and commerce. Like certain other minor divinities - Pecunia, Aesculanus, Argentinus - he watched over tradesmen's profits. Greek
"Neptunus - Neptune" Roman The chief marine divinity of the Romans. His name is probably connected with the verb valu or nato, and a contraction of namtunus. As the early Romans were not a maritime people, and had not much to do with the sea, the marine divinities are not often mentioned, and we scarcely know with any certainty what day in the year was set apart as the festival of Neptunus, though it seems to have been the 23rd of July. Roman
Goddess name "Nice" Roman The goddess of victory, or, as the Romans called her, Victoria
"Nixi Dii" Roman A general term, which seems to have been applied by the Romans to those divinities who were believed to assist women at the time when they were giving birth to a child. Before the cella of Minerva, on the Capitol, there were three statues, which were designated as Dii Nixi. Roman
Hero name "Peitho" Greek The personification of Persuasion (Suada or Suadela among the Romans), was worshipped as a divinity at Sicyon, where she was honoured with a temple in the agora. (The History of Herodotus, VIII) Peitho also occurs as a surname of other divinities, such as Aphrodite, whose worship was said to have been introduced at Athens by Theseus and of Artemis. Greek
God name "Penates" Romans The household gods of the Romans, both in regard to a private family and to the state, as the great family of citizens: hence we shall have to distinguish between private and public Penates.
"Pheme" Greek The personification of gossip, rumour or report. Homer calls her Ossa (fame) and the Romans Fama, after the Greek Pheme. Greek
"Philter" s A draught or charm to incite in another the passion of love. The Thessalian philters were the most renowned, but both the Greeks and Romans used these dangerous potions, which sometimes produced insanity. Lucretius is said to have been driven mad by a love-potion, and Caligula's death is attributed to some philters administered to him by his wife, C?sonia.
Deity name "Pilumnus" Roman A nature deity, brother of Picumnus. He ensured children grew properly and stayed healthy. Ancient Romans made an extra bed after the birth of a child in order to ensure the help of Pilumnus. He also taught humanity how to grind grain and sometimes identified as the husband of Danae, and therefore the father of Danaus and the ancestor of Turnus. Roman
"Pluvius" Roman The sender of Rain, a surname of Jupiter among the Romans.
"Queen of Heaven" Egyptian With the ancient Phoenicians was Astarte; Greeks, Hera; Romans, Juno; Trivia, Hecate, Diana, the Egyptian Isis, etc., were all so called; but with the Roman Catholics it is the Virgin Mary.
"Recaranus aka Garanus" Roman , a fabulous Italian shepherd of gigantic bodily strength and courage. The fact of his being a gigantic shepherd who recovered stolen oxen from him, led the Romans to consider him as identical with the Greek Heracles. Roman
God name "Rimer" Roman Chief god of Damascus; so called from the word rime, a "pomegranate," because he held a pomegranate in his right hand. The people bore a pomegranate in their coat armour. The Romans called this god Jupiter Cassius, from Mount Cassius, near Damascus.
"Salacia" Greek The female divinity of the sea among the Romans, and the wife of Neptune.
Goddess name "Salus" Greek The personification of health, prosperity, and the public welfare, among the Romans. In the first of these three senses she answers very closely to the Greek Hygieia, and was accordingly represented in works of art with the same attributes as the Greek goddess. In the second sense she represents prosperity in general and was invoked by the husbandmen at seed-time. In the third sense Salus is the goddess of the public welfare.
"Stator" Roman A Roman surname of Jupiter, describing him as staying the Romans in their flight from an enemy, and generally as preserving the existing order of things.
"Sterculius" Roman A surname of Saturnus, derived from Stercus, manure, because he had promoted Agriculture by teaching the people the use of manure. This seems to have been the original meaning, though some Romans state that Sterculius was a surname of Picumnus, the son of Faunus, to whom likewise improvements in Agriculture are ascribed. Roman
God name "Teraphim" Hebrew The household, family, or domestic gods of the Jews, similar to the lares and penates of the ancient Romans. Hebrew
God name "Terra" Greek Another form for terra, the name under which the earth was personified among the Romans, as Ge was among the Greeks. She is often mentioned in contrast with Jupiter, the god of heaven, and connected with Dis and the Manes. Greek
God name "Tonitrualis" Roman A surname of the god Jupiter, to whom the Romans attributed power over all the changes in the heavens, as Rain, storms, thunder and lightning.
"Tyche" Greek Personification of chance or luck, the Fortuna of the Romans, is called by Pindar a daughter of Zeus the Liberator. She was represented with different attributes. Greek
Goddess name "Venus" Greek The goddess of love among the Romans, and more especially of sensual love. Previously to her identification with the Greek Aphrodite, she was one of the least important divinities in the religion of the Romans, and it is observed by the ancients themselves, that her name was not mentioned in any of the documents relating to the kingly period of Roman history.
God name "Vertumnus" Roman Is said to have been an Etruscan divinity whose worship was introduced at Rome by an ancient Vulsinian colony. The name signifies "the god who changes or metamorphoses himself." For this reason the Romans connected Vertumnus with all occurrences to which the verb verto applies, such as the change of seasons, purchase and sale, the return of rivers to their proper beds,etc. But in reality the god was connected only with the transformation of plants, and their progress from being in blossom to that of bearing fruit. Roman
Goddess name "Virbius" Roman An ancient mythical king of Aricia and a favourite of Diana, who, when he had died, called him to life and intrusted him to the care of the nymph Aegeria. The fact of his being a favourite of Diana, the Taurian goddess, seems to have led the Romans to identify him with Hippolytus who, according to some traditions, had established the worship of Diana. Roman
"Volupia" Roman The personification of sensual pleasure among the Romans. She is also called Voluptas.