8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Sun" - 645 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
Demon name
"Polunocnica"
Ukranian 'Lady Midnight'. A demoness said to frighten children at night. She seems to have originally been the third Zorya of midnight with sisters dawn and Sunset. Ukranian

"Krasnyi"
Russian 'Red' or 'Beautiful'. Russian epithet to a girl and the Sun.

"MacGreine"
Ireland 'Son of the Sun', he was the husband of Eriu. Ireland
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Wuruntemu"
Hatti land 'Sun Goddess and mistress of the Hatti lands, the queen of heaven and earth.
God name
"Nahuti Ollin Tonatiuh"
Aztec ("Movement of the Sun";) was the Sun god. The Aztec people considered him the leader of Tollan, their heaven. He was also known as the fifth Sun, because the Aztecs believed that he was the Sun that took over when the fourth Sun was expelled from the sky. Aztec
Goddess name
"Mawu"
Fon / Benin, West Africa (1) moon goddess. The sister of the Sun god LISA. She is also considered to bestow fertility and motherhood and is generally benevolent in nature.(2) sky god. Ewe [Togo, West Africa]. Among the tribe neighboring the Fon. Mawu is perceived as male and a creator deity. He favors the color white and is also benevolent and generous in nature....
God name
"Anextiomarus"
Roman / British A Celtic epithet of the Sun-god Apollo recorded in a Romano-British inscription from South Shields, England. The form is a variant of Anextlomarus 'Great protector', a Divine style or name attested in a fragmentary Gallo-Roman dedication from Le Mans, France. Anextlomarus is also attested as a Gaulish man's father's name at Langres, and a feminine Divine form, Anextlomara, appears in two other Gallo-Roman dedications from Avenches, Switzerland. Roman / British
God name
"Kin"
Mayan A Mayan Sun god.
God name
"Scniitic Bel"
Babylon A Sun-god who rules among the shades below. Babylon
God name
"Genneas"
Syrian A Syrian Sun god likes to ride horses.
God name
"Elagabalus"
Arab A Syro-Phanician Sun-god, represented under the form of a huge conical stone.
Goddess name
"Bendis"
Greece A Thracian divinity in whom the moon was worshipped. Hesychius says "that the poet Cratinus called this goddess Two Spears, either because she had to discharge two duties, one towards heaven and the other towards the earth, or because she bore two lances, or lastly, because she had two lights, the one her own and the other derived from the Sun. In Greece she was sometimes identified with Persephone, but more commonly with Artemis.

"Psyche"
Greek A beautiful maiden beloved by Cupid, who visited her every night, but left her at Sunrise. Cupid bade her never seek to know who he was, but one night curiosity overcame her prudence, and she went to look at him. A drop of hot oil fell on his shoulder, awoke him, and he fled. Psyche next became the slave of Venus, who treated her most cruelly; but ultimately she was married to Cupid, and became immortal. Greek
Angel name
"Moakkibat"
Arabic A clåśś of angels. Two angels of this clåśś attend every child of Adam from the cradle to the grave. At Sunset they fly up with the record of the deeds done since Sunrise. Every good deed is entered ten times by the recording angel on the credit or right side of his ledger, but when an evil deed is reported the angel waits seven hours, "if haply in that time the evil-doer may repent." The Koran.
Goddess name
"Ninsun[a]"
Mesopotamia / Sumeria / Babylon / Akkadian A cow goddess that was the tutelary goddess of Gudea

"Adaro"
Melanesia / Polynesia A creature which is half human, half fish, having the upper body of a human and the lower part of its body is like a fish. They live in the Sun, and travel to earth on Rainbows. Melanesia / Polynesia
Demon name
"Buer"
Unk A demon of the second order and has the form of a star, though sometimes depicted with the head of a lion and the feet of a goat. He appears when the Sun is in Sagittarius. Unk
Demon name
"Kesi"
India A demon with and was defeated by Indra. In the Puranas, a Daitya who took the form of a horse and attacked Krishna, but was killed that hero's thrusting his arm into his jaws and rending him asunder. India
God name
"Adonis"
Phoenicia / Syria A dying & resurrected god that embodies vegetation scorched by the heat of the summer Sunshine
King name
"Heitsi-Eibib"
Namaqua A flood hero deity who "came from the east," landing in the west of Cape South Africa, a very long time ago, with fellow survivors from a Sunken kingdom. Namaqua
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.