8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Thracian" - 22 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Bendis"
Greece A Thracian divinity in whom the moon was worshipped. Hesychius says "that the poet Cratinus called this goddess Two Spears, either because she had to discharge two duties, one towards heaven and the other towards the earth, or because she bore two lances, or lastly, because she had two lights, the one her own and the other derived from the Sun. In Greece she was sometimes identified with Persephone, but more commonly with Artemis.
Goddess name
"Bendis"
Thracian Mother goddess. Hellenized and linked stylistically with ARTEMIS as a huntress. Appeared in Athens during the Peloponnesian war. Attributes: boots, torch and pointed cap....

"Biston"
Greek A son of Ares. Bistonians The Thracians; so called from Biston, son of Mars, who built Bistonia on the lake Bistonis. Greek
God name
"Boreas"
Greek / also Roman God of the north wind. He controlled the storm which destroyed the Persian fleet sailing against Athens. Identified with Winter frosts. According to the Theogony (Hesiod), he is the son of EOS and Astraeos and is of Thracian origin: “ . . . when Thracian Boreas huddles the thick clouds.”...

"Butes"
Greek Son of Boreas, a Thracian, was hostile towards his step-brother Lycurgus, and therefore compelled by his father to emigrate. He accordingly went with a band of colonists to the island of Strongyle, afterwards called Naxos. But as he and his companions had no women, they made predatory excursions, and also came to Thessaly, where they carried off the women who were just celebrating a festival of Dionysus. Butes himself took Coronis; but she invoked Dionysus, who struck Butes with madness, so that he threw himself into a well. Greek
Nymph name
"Cadmilus"
Greek According to Acusilaus a son of Hephaestus and Cabeiro, and father of the Samothracian Cabeiri and the Cabeirian nymphs. Others consider Cadmilus himself as the fourth of the Samothracian Cabeiri. Greek

"Cotys"
Phrygian A Thracian divinity, whose festival resembled that of the Phrygian Cybele, and was celebrated on hills with riotous proceedings.
Spirit name
"Derzelas"
Dacian God of health and human spirit's vitality, also known under the names of Great God Gebeleizis, Derzis or the Thracian Knight.

"Ephialtes"
Greek One of the Aloeidae. When Iphimedeia and her daughter, Pancratis, celebrated the orgies of Dionysus on Mount Drius, they were carried off by Thracian pirates to Naxos or Strongyle; but both were delivered by the Aloadae Otus and Ephialtes. Greek

"Eumolpus"
Greek That is, " the good singer," a Thracian who is described as having come to Attica either as a bard, a warrior, or a priest of Demeter and Dionysus. Greek
God name
"Heros"
Thracian Chthonic underworld god. Depicted as a horseman. His image regularly appears on funerary stelae....

"Kotys or Cotys"
Phrygian A Thracian divinity, whose festival, the Cotyttia resembled that of the Phrygian Cybele, and was celebrated on hills with riotous proceedings.
King name
"Lydia"
Greek Daughter of the king of Lydia, was sought in marriage by Alcestes, a Thracian knight; his suit was refused, and he repaired to the king of Armenia, who gave him an army, with which he laid siege to Lydia. He was persuaded by Lydia to raise the siege. The king of Armenia would not give up the project, and Alcestes slew him. Lydia now set him all sorts of dangerous tasks to "prove the ardour of his love," all of which he surmounted. Lastly, she induced him to kill all his allies, and when she had thus cut off the claws of this love-sick lion she mocked him. Alcestes pined and died, and Lydia was doomed to endless torment in hell, where Astolpho saw her, to whom she told her story. Greek

"Pancratis"
Greek A daughter of Aloeus and Iphimedeia, in the Phthiotian Achaia. Once when Thracian pirates, under Butes, invaded that district, they carried off from Mount Drius the women who were solemnizing a festival of Dionysus. Among them was Iphimedeia and her daughter Pancratis. Greek
Nymph name
"Rhodope"
Greek The nymph of a Thracian well, was the wife of Haemus and mother of Hebrus, and is mentioned among the playmates of Persephone. Greek
King name
"Rhoeteia"
Greek A daughter of the Thracian king Sithon and Achiroe, a daughter of Neilos. She was a sister of Pallene, and the Trojan promontory of Rhoeteium was believed to have derived its name from her. Greek
Goddess name
"Semele (earth)"
Greco - Roman but probably of Thracian or Phrygian origin Mother goddess. According to legend she was the mortal daughter of Cadmos and became the mother of the god DIONYSOS (BACCHUS) after a brief liaison with ZEUS (JUPITER), also in mortal guise. Semele was burned to death on Olympus, unable to withstand the presence of Zeus in godly form, but was subsequently deified by him....
King name
"Tereus"
Greek A son of Ares, a king of the Thracians, in Daulis, afterwards Phocis. Some traditions place Tereus at Pegae, in Megaris. Greek
Nymph name
"Thamyris"
Greek An ancient Thracian bard, was a son of Philammon and the nymph Argiope. He went so far in his conceit as to think that he could surpåśś the Muses in song; in consequence of which he was deprived of his sight and of the power of singing. He was represented with a broken lyre in his hand. Greek
God name
"Zalmoxis"
Greek A legendary social and religious reformer, regarded as the only true god by the Thracian Dacians. According to Herodotus (IV), the Getae, who believed in the immortality of the soul, looked upon death merely as going to Zalmoxis, as they knew the way to become immortals. Greek
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8 ways to attend college for free

With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.

However, the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.

If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.

We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.

Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.



7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.