8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Tiv" - 434 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
Goddess name
"Nirrti (destruction)"
Hindu / Vedic / Puranic (1) Destructive goddess of darkness. Known chiefly from the Rg-veda, Nirrti has a generally malignant aspect and is åśśociated with pain, misfortune and death. She is believed to live in the south (the land of the dead). She is dark-skinned, wears dark dress and receives the “dark husks” of sacrifice. She is feared by many Hindus, whose offerings are frequent and repeated. In later Hinduism, Nirrti changes sex and becomes a dikpala god of terrifying appearance, guarding the southwestern quarter; he has various consorts including Davi, Kalika and Krsnangi. He stands upon a lion, a man or a corpse. Attributes: javelin, shield, staff, sword and teeth.(2) God. Buddhist. A dikpala or guardian. Color: blue. Stands upon a corpse. Attributes: shield and sword....
Spirit name
"Kubera (misshapen)"
Hindu / Vedic, Epic / Puranic (1) God of riches. He was originally the head of the YAKSAS spirits of the Forests, but by Puranic times was åśśociated with wealth and productivity. He is also a dikpala guardian of the northern quarter. The son of Pulastya and Idavida, his consorts include Yaksi, VASUDHARA and Vriddhi. Identified with the city of Alaka. He is depicted as a dwarfish figure riding upon a Brahman or a chariot. Color: white. Attributes: generally carrying a purse, but occasionally with various other items. Also Kuvera, Kauveri.(2) God of riches. Buddhist-Lamaist [Tibet]. One of a group of DHARMAPALA with terrible appearance and royal attire. Also a dikpala or guardian of the northern quarter. Color: yellow. Attributes: ax, banner, club, cup, hook, Ichneumon disgorging jewels, noose, reliquary and occasionally a trident....
Goddess name
"Dharani (earth)"
Hindu / Epic / Puranic (1) Goddess. Consort of PARASURAMA and an avatara of the goddess LAKSMI.(2) Collective name for a group of deities. Buddhist. Twelve personifications of a particular kind of short mystical religious text used as a charm. Also dharini....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Hariti (green or stealing)"
Hindu / Epic / Puranic (1) Mother goddess. One of the group of MATARAS (mothers) who are the patrons of children. Considered by some to be identical with the goddess Vriddhi. Her consort is Pancika, alternatively KUBERA. In her destructive aspect she steals and eats children. Particularly known from the north and northwest of India. Attribute: a child may be held at her hip, sometimes being eaten.(2) Plague goddess. Buddhist. Associated with smallpox. Also regarded in some texts as the goddess of fertility....

"Buddhakapala"
Buddhist / Mahayana (Buddha's skullcap) A significant emanation of AKSOBHYA. Alternatively a form of HERUKA. His SAKTI is CITRASENA. Color: blue-black. Attributes: club, cup, drum, image of Aksobhya and knife.

"Arne"
Metamorphoses 1. A daughter of Aeolus, from whom the Boeotian town Arne, afterwards called Chaeroneia, as well as the Thessalian Arne, were believed to have derived their name. 2. A woman who betrayed her native country for gold, and was therefore metamorphosed into a jackdaw. (Metamorphoses)

"Niobe"
Greek 1. A daughter of Phoroneus, and by Zeus the mother of Argus and Pelasgus. In other traditions she is called the mother of Phoroneus and wife of Inachus. 2. A daughter of Tantalus by the Pleiad Taygete or the Hyad Dione, or, according to others, a daughter of Pelops and the wife of Zethus or Alalcomeneus, while Parthenius relates quite a different story, for he makes her a daughter of Assaon and the wife of Philottus, and relates that she entered into a dispute with Leto about the beauty of their respective children. Greek

"Muati"
Mesopotamia / Sumeria Maat is merely the moral expression of Muat in the social world. An individual of this expression is known as a Muati i.e. "One who affirms Reality". The collective body of all Muati individuals have the anthropomorphic reference of Haru, the establisher of Maat. Mesopotamia / Sumeria
God name
"Mogounos"
Britain A Celtic god worshipped in Roman Britain and in Gaul. The main evidence is from altars dedicated to the god by Roman soldiers, but the deity is not a native Italic one.
God name
"Silvåñuś"
Roman A Latin divinity of the fields and Forests, to whom in the very earliest times the Tyrrhenian Pelasgians are said to have dedicated a grove and a festival. He is described as a god watching over the fields and husbandmen, and is also called the protector of the boundaries of fields.
Spirit name
"Amalivaca"
Native America A Native American spirit, who had seven daughters. He broke their legs to prevent their running away, and left them to people the Forests.

"Terminus"
Roman A Roman divinity presiding over boundaries and frontiers. His worship is said to have been instituted by Numa who ordered that every one should mark the boundaries of his landed property by stones to be consecrated to Jupiter, and at which every year sacrifices were to be offered at the festival of the Terminalia.
Goddess name
"Juno"
Roman A Roman goddess of marriage and the long-suffering wife of Jupiter. Like her Greek equivalent, Hera, she was the protector of women, in particular married women. A festival took place in her honour on the calends (first) of March. Roman

"Cotys"
Phrygian A Thracian divinity, whose festival resembled that of the Phrygian Cybele, and was celebrated on hills with riotous proceedings.

"Kotys or Cotys"
Phrygian A Thracian divinity, whose festival, the Cotyttia resembled that of the Phrygian Cybele, and was celebrated on hills with riotous proceedings.
Goddess name
"Aufaniae"
Celtic A collective name for a group of Celtic mother goddesses worshipped throughout Celtic Europe. They are known only from symbolical inscriptions and they appear to have been found mainly in the German Rhineland. Celtic
Deities name
"Mandah/ Mundih"
Arabic A collective name of gods, guardian deities that took care of irrigation
Supreme god name
"Paneu"
Kafir / Afghanistan A collective term for seven gods. The Divine brothers are cast as the hunters and henchmen of the supreme goddess DISANI. Each is equipped with a golden bow and quiver. They are generally portrayed as merciless and malignant forces. Also Paradik, Purron....

"Mana"
Oceanic A concept of an impersonal force or quality that resides in people, animals, and inanimate objects and that instills in the appreciative observer a sense of respect or wonder. Oceanic

"Pancratis"
Greek A daughter of Aloeus and Iphimedeia, in the Phthiotian Achaia. Once when Thracian pirates, under Butes, invaded that district, they carried off from Mount Drius the women who were solemnizing a festival of Dionysus. Among them was Iphimedeia and her daughter Pancratis. Greek
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.