8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "Tiv" - 434 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
God name
"Nabu"
Mesopotamian / Babylonian - Akkadian God of writing and wisdom. The son of MARDUX and ZARPANITU(M), his consort is TASMETU(M). He is symbolized by the inscribing stylus. A major deity in neo-Babylonian times from the eighth century BC onward, with an important sanctuary at Borsippa, near Babylon, known as the Ezida. He is considered a god of mountain regions, described as the “firstborn son of Marduk” and his image is closely involved in the New Year akitu festival. Also NEBO (Vetus Testamentum)....
Goddess name
"Naenia"
Roman A dirge or lamentation such as was uttered at funerals, either by relatives of the deceased or by hired persons. At Rome Naenia was personified and worshipped as a goddess, who even had a chapel, which, however, as in the case of all other gods in connection with the dead, was outside the walls of the city, near the porta Viminalis. The object of this worship was probably to procure rest and peace for the departed in the lower world. Roman

"Nalima and Tellima"
Dara The female and male halves of the creative power. Dara
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Deities name
"Nanahuati (rumor)"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Creator god. In cosmogony, when on the fifth day of creation the gods sat in judgment to elect the new Sun god, Nanahuatl and TECCIZTECATL cremated themselves in the sacred fire. The heart of Nanahuatl ascended to become the new Sun and that of Tecciztecatl became the moon. Tradition suggests that Nanahuatl is diseased and impoverished but of great courage, while Tecciztecatl is wealthy and a coward. In an alternative tradition, in which Nanahuatl is the son of QUETZALCOATL and Tecciztecatl is the son of TLALOC, both deities are hurled into the fire by their fathers. NOTE: eventually all the gods sacrificed themselves so that mankind might be engendered from their remains. Also Nanahuatzin....
Deity name
"Narada (giver of advice)"
Hindu / Vedic, Epic / Puranic Minor but popular deity. Narada is depicted as a sage who is also a messenger and teacher. Born from the head, or throat, of BRAHMA, and alternatively a minor incarnation of V IS'NU. In various roles he is a guardian deity of women, a musician and a wanderer. Narada, often bearded, is generally depicted standing with the musical instrument which is his invention, the vina (lute). By contrast to his benign nature he is also described as a “maker of strife” and as “vile.” Also Kali-karaka; Pisuna....

"Nebethepet"
Egypt mistress of the offering. The feminine counterpart of the creative principle of Atum. Egypt
Goddess name
"Neharennia"
Roman / Celtic Goddess of seafarers. Worshiped extensively between the second and thirteenth centuries AD, particularly in the Netherlands with sanctuaries at Domberg at the mouth of the Rhine and Colijnsplaat on the Scheldt. Probably began as a tribal deity of the Morini tribe. She is generally depicted with the attributes of fertility—a basket of fruit or cornucopia. She may also often have a small lapdog. Alternatively, she stands with one foot on the prow of a boat and grasps an oar or the rope....
Planet name
"Neptunus"
Italic / Roman God of irrigation. Identified with the planet Neptune, but thought to have originated as an agricultural deity concerned with watering. He was celebrated in the festival of Neptunalia on July 23. Also the patron deity of horseracing. He became syncretized with the Greek god POSEIDON, but Neptune's modern åśśociation with the sea is a misrepresentation....

"Neptunus - Neptune"
Roman The chief marine divinity of the Romans. His name is probably connected with the verb valu or nato, and a contraction of namtunus. As the early Romans were not a maritime people, and had not much to do with the sea, the marine divinities are not often mentioned, and we scarcely know with any certainty what day in the year was set apart as the festival of Neptunus, though it seems to have been the 23rd of July. Roman
Goddess name
"Nin Ezen (La)"
Sumerian Goddess. An alternative name for the goddess of healing, GULA....
God name
"Ninazu"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian Chthonic god. Less frequently encountered in the texts than NERGAL. Son of ENLIL and NINLIL or, in alternative traditions, of ERES KIGAL and the father of Ning-is-zida. The patron deity of Es nunna until superseded by TISPAK. His sanctuaries are the E-sikil and E-kurma. Also identified as a god of healing, he is (unlike Nergal) generally benevolent....
Goddess name
"Ninhursagaa/ Nintu"
Mesopotamia / Sumeria / Babylon / Akkadian / Iraq The goddess of the earth and creator of humans, fertility & productivity
Goddess name
"Niniiniinna"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian Fertility goddess. A daughter of An and Uras and probably an alternative name for Is”tar. She is the consort of the god Pabilsag and is mentioned in respect of a sanctuary built by warad Sin during the Isin dynasty. Texts describe her going to present Enlil with gifts in Nippur. Other inscriptions suggest she was the mother of the god Damu (Dumuzi)....
God name
"Ninkigal"
Mesopotamian / BabylonianAkkadian Chthonic god. Worshiped at Ur and Umma during the period of the third dynasty of Ur. Celebrations included the eses monthly lunar festivals....
Goddess name
"Ninkurra"
Mesopotamian / Sumerian / Babylonian - Akkadian Minor mother goddess. Ninkurra is linked briefly as consort to Enlil (her grandfather), by whom after nine days of gestation she gave birth to the goddess Uttu. In alternative mythology she was the mother of Nin-imma, the deification of female sex organs....
Deity name
"Ninurta"
Sumeria The deity in charge of the violent and destructive south wind

"Niobe"
Greek 1. A daughter of Phoroneus, and by Zeus the mother of Argus and Pelasgus. In other traditions she is called the mother of Phoroneus and wife of Inachus. 2. A daughter of Tantalus by the Pleiad Taygete or the Hyad Dione, or, according to others, a daughter of Pelops and the wife of Zethus or Alalcomeneus, while Parthenius relates quite a different story, for he makes her a daughter of Assaon and the wife of Philottus, and relates that she entered into a dispute with Leto about the beauty of their respective children. Greek
Goddess name
"Nirrti (destruction)"
Hindu / Vedic / Puranic (1) Destructive goddess of darkness. Known chiefly from the Rg-veda, Nirrti has a generally malignant aspect and is åśśociated with pain, misfortune and death. She is believed to live in the south (the land of the dead). She is dark-skinned, wears dark dress and receives the “dark husks” of sacrifice. She is feared by many Hindus, whose offerings are frequent and repeated. In later Hinduism, Nirrti changes sex and becomes a dikpala god of terrifying appearance, guarding the southwestern quarter; he has various consorts including Davi, Kalika and Krsnangi. He stands upon a lion, a man or a corpse. Attributes: javelin, shield, staff, sword and teeth.(2) God. Buddhist. A dikpala or guardian. Color: blue. Stands upon a corpse. Attributes: shield and sword....
Goddess name
"Nona"
Roman Minor goddess of birth. Responsible for the ninth month of gestation, she is often linked with the goddess DECIMA. In later Roman times she becomes one of a trio of goddesses of fate, with Decima and MORTA, the goddess of death, collectively known as the PARCAE....
God name
"Nzambi"
Bakongo / Democratic Republic of Congo, central Africa Creator god. He created the first mor tal pair or, in alternative tradition, an androgy nous being in the guise of a palm tree called Muntu Walunga (the complete person). He also endowed this being with intelligence. In wooden sculptures the tree bears a woman's head and breast on one side and a bearded face on the other. Eventually the tree divided into two sepa rate sexes. Also Nyambi; Nzambe; Yambe; Zambi....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.