8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "advice" - 15 records

Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Demon name
"Abigor"
Christian A warrior demon who commands sixty legions and a Grand Duke of Hell. Can fortell future and give military advice.
Angel name
"Andras"
Greek A Great Marquis of Hell who commands thirty legions, has the body of an angel and the head of an owl. He rides a black wolf and carries a saber. He can give advice on how to kill, and he can escalate quarrels and discord.

"Athena"
Greek One of the great divinities of the Greeks. Homer calls her a daughter of Zeus, without any allusion to her mother or to the manner in which she was called into existence, while most of the later traditions agree in stating that she was born from the head of Zeus. According to the Theogony of Hesiod, Metis, the first wife of Zeus, was the mother of Athena, but when Metis was pregnant with her, Zeus, on the advice of Gaea and Uråñuś, swallowed Metis up, and afterwards gave birth himself to Athena, who sprang from his head.

"Bangma or Bangmi"
India A fabulous bird in India, which can talk and give oracular advice.

"Belomancy"
Greek Divination by arrows. Labels being attached to a given number of arrows, the archers let them fly, and the advice on the label of the arrow which flies farthest is accepted and acted on. This practice is common with the Arabs. Greek
King name
"Deucalion"
Greek Son of Prometheus and Clymene. He was king in Phthia, and married to Pyrr. When Zeus, after the treatment he had received from Lycaon, had resolved to destroy the degenerate race of men who inhabited the earth, Deucalion, on the advice of his father, built a ship, and carried into it stores of provisions and when Zeus sent a flood all over Hellas, which destroyed all its inhabitants, Deucalion and Pyrrha alone were saved. Greek
God name
"Eurydice"
Greek The most famous was a woman-or a nymph-who was the wife of Orpheus. While fleeing from Aristaeus, she was bitten by a serpent and died. Distraught, Orpheus played such sad songs and sang so mournfully that all the nymphs and gods wept and gave him advice. Orpheus accomplished something no other person ever has: he traveled to the underworld and by his music softened the heart of Hades and Persephone, who allowed Eurydice to return with him to the world of the living. Greek

"Eurylochus"
Greek One of the companions of Odysseus in his wanderings. He was the only one that escaped from the house of Circe, while his friends were metamorphosed into swine; and when Odysseus went to the lower world, Eurylochus and Perimedes performed the prescribed sacrifices. It was on his advice that the companions of Odysseus carried off some of the oxen of Helios. Greek
God name
"Haubas"
Arabia God worshipped in pre-Islamic southern Arabia, particularly Sheba. Haubas's advice was often sought via consultation with oracles.
God name
"Ifa"
Yoruba / western Nigeria, West Africa God of wisdom. An oracular deity who, according to tradition, lives in a sanctuary in the holy city of Ile Ife but who is called on by the tutelary god, OLDUMARE, for advice. He is the father of eight children, all of whom became paramount chiefs....
Deity name
"Narada (giver of advice)"
Hindu / Vedic, Epic / Puranic Minor but popular deity. Narada is depicted as a sage who is also a messenger and teacher. Born from the head, or throat, of BRAHMA, and alternatively a minor incarnation of V IS'NU. In various roles he is a guardian deity of women, a musician and a wanderer. Narada, often bearded, is generally depicted standing with the musical instrument which is his invention, the vina (lute). By contrast to his benign nature he is also described as a “maker of strife” and as “vile.” Also Kali-karaka; Pisuna....

"Nindara"
Nijin Who gives advice on the rooftops; you who among powerful lords are, who among rulers hold the staff, a shepherd who oversees the teeming people; who strides about the city's squares by night at the middle of the watch; you who open the gates at daybreak, who make their doors stand open onto the street: you have great Divine powers, more than anyone could require. Nijin
God name
"Ranginui"
Polynesian / including Maori sky god. The socalled sky father of the Polynesian culture whose consort is PAPATUANUKU, the earth mother. During a prolonged period of inseparable intercourse they became the prime parents of the Polynesian pantheon of gods. The children found life between the bodies of the parents too cramped and conspired to force them apart. Though one offspring, TUMATAUENGA, wanted to slay them, the advice of TANEMAHUTA, the Forest god, prevailed and RANGINUI and Papatuanuku were merely forced apart....

"Sirens"
Greek Mythical beings who were believed to have the power of enchanting and charming, by their song, any one who heard them. When Odysseus, in his wanderings through the Mediterranean, came near the island on the lovely beach of which the Sirens were sitting, and endeavouring to allure him and his companions, he, on the advice of Circe, stuffed the ears of his companions with wax, and tied himself to the mast of his vessel, until he was so far off that he could no longer hear their song. Greek
God name
"Ta'lab"
Arabia God of the moon in pre-Islamic southern Arabia. His oracle was consulted for advice.

8 ways to attend college for free

With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.

However, the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.

If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.

We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.

Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.



7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.