8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "death" - 305 records

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Name ▲▼Origin ▲▼Description ▲▼
Demon name
"Guta"
Hungary demonic being who who beats his victims to death. Hungary
Goddess name
"HUITZILPOCHTLI"
Aztec / Mesoamerican / Mexico Blue hummingbird on left foot. Sun god, patron god of the Aztec nation. The tutelary god of the Aztecs who also regarded him as a war god. He is the southern (blue) aspect or emanation of the Sun god TEZCATLIPOCA, the so-called high-flying Sun, and the head of the group clåśśed as the Huitzilpochtli complex. He is regarded, in alternative tradition, as one of the four sons of Tezcatlipoca. His mother is the decapitated earth goddess COATLICUE, from whose womb he sprang fully armed. He slaughtered his sister (moon) and his 400 brothers (stars) in revenge for the death of his mother, signifying the triumph of Sunlight over darkness....
God name
"Hachiman"
Shinto / Japan God of war and peace. A deity whose origins are confused. The name does not appear in either of the sacred texts of Shintoism, but such a deity was probably worshiped in the distant past with the alternative title of HimeGami or Hime-O-Kami. The cult center was on the southern island of Kyushu at Usa. In modern Shintoism, Hachiman originates as a member of the imperial dynasty. Named Ojin-Tenno and born in AD 200 to the empress Jingu-Kogo, he greatly improved the living standards and culture of Japan during his remarkable reign. The place of his birth was marked by a sanctuary and several centuries after his death, a vision of a child KAMI appeared there to a priest. The kami identified himself by the Chinese ideogram representing the name Hachiman, and thus the link developed. The site is, today, the location of a magnificent shrine, the Umi-Hachiman-Gu, where Hachiman has been perceived as a god of war. Soldiers departing for battle once took with them relics from the shrine. Hachiman is also a deity of peace and a guardian of human life and, when pacifism dominated Japan during the post-war era, he became more strongly identified in the latter context....
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
God name
"Hades/ Pluto"
Greek A god of death & one of the Olympian gods

"Hameh"
Arabian In mythology, a bird formed from the blood near the brains of a murdered man. This bird cries "Iskoonee!" (Give me drink!), meaning drink of the murderer's blood; and this it cries incessantly till the death is avenged, when it flies away. Arabian
God name
"Harendotes [Greek]"
Egypt Form of the god HORUS. Under this name, Horus specifically guards and protects his father OSIRIS in death. He thus becomes åśśociated with sarcophagi and appears frequently in coffin texts. Also Har-nedj-itef (Egyptian)....
Goddess name
"Hathor"
Egypt The Beautiful Face In The Boat For Thousands Of Years. Goddess of procreation, sexuality, romance, trees, poetry, music, alcohol, childbirth, infants, death, fertility, love, marriage, beauty, joy and the sky. Egypt
Spirit name
"Haurvatat"
Zoroastrian One of the spirits, it is åśśociated with life after death. Zoroastrian
Goddess name
"Hel"
Scandinavia Goddess of death and the underworld. The Christian concept of "Hell" came from this goddess, however, her realm of the dead for those who were wicked was cold and dark, not fiery. Scandinavia
Goddess name
"Hel[i]"
Germanic A goddess of death
Goddess name
"Helen"
Helen is frequently alleged, in Homeric tradition, to have been a mortal heroine or a demigoddess Goddess [Greek] åśśociated with the city of Troy. In his Catalogues of Women Hesiod, the Greek contemporary of Homer and author of the definitive Theogony of the Greek pantheon, confounds tradition by making Helen the daughter of ZEUS and Ocean. Other Greek authors contemporary with Hesiod give Helen's mother as NEMESIS, the Greco-Roman goddess of justice and revenge, who was raped by Zeus. The mythology placing Helen as a demigoddess identifies her mother as Leda, the mortal wife of Tyndareus, also seduced by Zeus who fathered POLLUX as Helen's brother. However Hesiod strongly denied these claims. Homeric legend describes Helen's marriage to king Menelaus of Sparta and her subsequent abduction by Paris, said to have been the catalyst for the Trojan war. After her death, mythology generally places her among the stars with the Dioscuri (sons of Zeus), better known as Castor and Pollux, the twins of the Gemini constellation. Helen was revered on the island of Rhodes as the goddess Dendritis.See also DISKOURI....
Goddess name
"Heli"
Germanic Goddess of death germanic
Goddess name
"Hi'aika"
Hawaiian Goddess. The daughter of HAUMEA and younger sister of PELE, the volcano goddess, Hi'aika is the mistress of the dance and especially of the hula. Separate traditions identify her with LAKA, the god of the hula and the son of KANE, the god of light; and with a goddess, Na Wahine, the daughter of the primordial creator principle KEAWE. The hula was designed to give a formalized structure to the enactment of myths and among the favorite topics is the romance between Pele and the hero Lohiau. According to mythology Hi'aika was entrusted with a mission to find Lohiau on Pele's behalf and to bring him back to her, a mission that subsequently enflamed the jealousy of Pele over her sister's developing relationship with Lohiau, and brought about his death in Pele's fiery lava....
Goddess name
"Hi-No-Kagu-Tsuchi"
Japan Fire god whose birth caused the death of the primordial goddess Izanami Japan / Shinto
Goddess name
"Hi-No-Kagu-Tsuchi"
Shinto / Japan Fire god. The deity whose birth caused the death by burning of the primordial goddess IZANAMI after which the eight thunders sprang from her corpse....
Goddess name
"Hine-Ata-Uira (daughter of the sparkling dawn)"
Polynesian / including Maori Goddess of light. The daughter of the creator god TANE and HINEAHU-ONE. She did not remain a sky goddess but descended into the underworld, where she became the personification of death, HINE-NUITE-PO....
Goddess name
"Hine-Nui-Te-Po"
Maori Giant goddess of death, of night and of the underworld. She married her father, fled in horror to the underworld when she found out and cursed humanity with death in retribution. Maori
King name
"Hippoçõõñ"
Greek The eldest, but natural son of Oebalus and Bateia, and a step­brother of Tyndareus, Icarius and Arene, at Sparta. After his father's death, Hippoçõõñ expelled his brother Tyndareus, in order to secure the kingdom to himself; but Heracles led Tyndareus back and slew Hippoçõõñ and his sons. Greek
God name
"Hogfather"
Europian The Discworld's version of Father Christmas or Santa Claus. He wears a red, fur-lined cloak, and rides a sleigh pulled by four wild boars, Gouger, Rooter, Tusker and Snouter. In earlier times he gave households pork products, and naughty children a bag of bloody bones. Earlier than that, he was a Winter god of the death-and-renewal kind. The modern version is a jolly toymaker, with vestiges of the earlier myths (such as his Castle of Bones, a vast palace of ice which has nothing notably bony about it, except for the suggestion of a protruding femur or scapula here and there) still clinging to him.
Demon name
"Hun Hau"
Mayan God of death and the Head of demons. Mayan
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.