8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "earth" - 605 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼

"Ksitigarbha"
Buddhist / Mahayana 'Earth-Womb'. "Name of a Bodhisattva who saves suffering beings in the hell" he aspires to deliver sentient beings wandering astray in the five(or six) paths of mundane existence. Buddhist / Mahayana
Goddess name
"Wuruntemu"
Hatti land 'Sun Goddess and mistress of the Hatti lands, the queen of heaven and earth.
God name
"Guçúɱatz"
Mayan ("feathered serpent";) was a feathered snake god, one ofthe gods who created earth and humanity. Mayan
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Dharani (earth)"
Hindu / Epic / Puranic (1) Goddess. Consort of PARASURAMA and an avatara of the goddess LAKSMI.(2) Collective name for a group of deities. Buddhist. Twelve personifications of a particular kind of short mystical religious text used as a charm. Also dharini....

"Wandering Jew"
Greek (1) Of Greek tradition. Aristeas, a poet who continued to appear and disappear alternately for above 400 years, and who visited all the mythical nations of the earth.
Deities name
"Ame-No-Minaka-Nushi-No-Kami"
Shinto (Exalted Musubi deity), who is later related to the gods of the heaven; Kami-musubi no Kami (Sacred Musubi deity), related to the gods of the earth; and Ame no Minaka-nushi no Kami (Heavenly Centre-Ruling deity). Some Shinto scholars hold that all Shinto deities are manifestations of Ame no Minaka-nushi no Kami.
God name
"Ataokoloinona"
Madagascar (What-A-Strange-Thing} son of Ndriananahary, the creator god, who was sent to earth to look in to everything and to advise on the possibility of creating living beings. He never appeared again. Madagascar

"Rusor"
Roman A Roman divinity, was worshipped as one of the companions of Tellus, by which was personified the power of nature (the earth) of bringing forth to light the seeds entrusted to her.
Goddess name
"Bendis"
Greece A Thracian divinity in whom the moon was worshipped. Hesychius says "that the poet Cratinus called this goddess Two Spears, either because she had to discharge two duties, one towards heaven and the other towards the earth, or because she bore two lances, or lastly, because she had two lights, the one her own and the other derived from the Sun. In Greece she was sometimes identified with Persephone, but more commonly with Artemis.

"Hanuman"
Hindu A celestial being, named Punjikasthala, who, due to a curse, was born on the earth as a female vanara. The curse was to be removed on her giving birth to an incarnation of Lord Shiva. Hindu
Goddess name
"Tlaltecuhtli"
Aztec A chthonic creator goddess. (Tlal-teh-koo-tlee) is the monstrous earth goddess. Her name means "The one who give and devours life" and she required many human sacrifices to sustain her.
God name
"Munjen Malik"
Kafir / Afghanistan A chthonic earth god
Goddess name
"Tu"
China A chthonic earth goddess & fertility spirit
Goddess name
"Pacha Mama"
Inca A chthonic goddess of fertility & the earth, now syncretized with the Christian Virgin Mary
God name
"Mulungu"
Africa A creator God of the Nyamwezi people of Tanzania in eastern Africa. Despite being the creator and protector of the world, he is distant and has little contact with anyone. It is said that he once lived on earth, but when someone set fire to the landscape he asked a spider to spin him a web to climb up into the sky, where he lives today. He is revered now as a sky god, with thunder as his voice.

"Adaro"
Melanesia / Polynesia A creature which is half human, half fish, having the upper body of a human and the lower part of its body is like a fish. They live in the Sun, and travel to earth on Rainbows. Melanesia / Polynesia
Goddess name
"Elara"
Greek A daughter of Orchomenus or Minyas, who became by Zeus the mother of the giant Tityus and Zeus, from fear of Hera, concealed her under the earth. (Apollodorus i. Argonautica) This was where she gave birth to Tityas, who some traditions state to be the son of Elara and Gaia, the earth goddess. Greek
God name
"Helara"
Greek A daughter of Orchomenus, became by Zeus the mother of Tityus, but the god, from fear of Hera, concealed her under the earth. Greek
Angel name
"Nama"
Greek A daughter of the race of man, who was beloved by the angel Zaraph. Her one wish was to love purely, intensely, and holily; but she fixed her love on a seraph, a creature, more than her Creator; therefore, in punishment, she was condemned to abide on earth, "unchanged in heart and frame," so long as the earth endureth; but when time is no more, both she and her angel lover will be admitted into those courts "where love never dies." Hebrew
Goddess name
"Cybele"
Phrygian A deification of the earth Mother. Like Gaia (the "Earth") or her Minoan equivalent Rhea, Cybele embodies the fertile earth, a goddess of caverns and mountains, walls and fortresses, nature, wild animals, especially lions and bees. Phrygian
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.