8 ways to attend college for free
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List of Gods : "fear" - 60 records

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Name ▲▼ Origin ▲▼ Description ▲▼
King name
"Charybdis and Scylla"
Greek The names of two rocks between Italy and Sicily, and only a short distance from one another. In the midst of the one of these rocks which was nearest to Italy, there dwelt, according to Homer, Scylla, a daughter of Crataeis, a fearful monster, barking like a dog, with twelve feet, six long necks and mouths, each of which contained three rows of sharp teeth. Greek

"Deima"
Greek The personification of fear. She was represented in the form of a fearful woman on the tomb of Medeia's children at Corinth. Greek
Goddess name
"Elara"
Greek A daughter of Orchomenus or Minyas, who became by Zeus the mother of the giant Tityus and Zeus, from fear of Hera, concealed her under the earth. (Apollodorus i. Argonautica) This was where she gave birth to Tityas, who some traditions state to be the son of Elara and Gaia, the earth goddess. Greek
With the costs of higher education at an all-time high, the American Dream of a college education can seem like just that — a dream.
However the reality is that there are lots of things a prospective student can do to help offset the high costs of higher education.
If you’re trying to figure out how to go to college for free, we have some advice that might help you on your way.
We’ve covered a wide range of options from how to get free tuition through a grant to various service opportunities.
Take a look at these and other ways you might be able to score a free college education.
Goddess name
"Epaine"
Greek The fearful, a surname of Persephone. Plutarch suggests, that it might also be understood in a euphemistic sense as the praised goddess. Greek
God name
"Helara"
Greek A daughter of Orchomenus, became by Zeus the mother of Tityus, but the god, from fear of Hera, concealed her under the earth. Greek
King name
"Lamia"
Greek A female phantom, by which children were frightened. According to tradition, she was originally a Libyan queen, of great beauty and a daughter of Belus. She was beloved by Zeus, and Hera in her jealousy robbed her of her children. Lamia, from revenge and despair, robbed others of their children, and murdered them; and the savage cruelty in which she now indulged rendered her ugly, and her face became fearfully distorted. Zeus gave her the power of taking her eyes out of her head, and putting them in again. Greek

"Nemesis"
Greek Is most commonly described as a daughter of night, though some call her a daughter of Erebus or of Oceåñuś. Nemesis is a personification of the moral reverence for law, of the natural fear of committing a culpable action, and hence of conscience, and for this reason she is mentioned along with Shame. Greek
God name
"Palici"
Greek Twin gods, originating in Sicily. They were sometimes said to have been the sons of Zeus by Thaleia the daughter of Hephaestus, sometimes the sons of Zeus by Aetna. While she was pregnant with the twins, Thaleia, fearing Hera's jealousy hid in the earth and when the time came the twin boys emerged from the ground, which explains their name 'the Returners'. Greek

"Phobos"
Greek The personification of fear, is described as a son of Ares and Cythereia, a brother of Deimos, and is one of the ordinary companions of Ares. Phobus was represented on the shield of Agamemnon, on the chest of Cypselus, with the head of a lion. Greek
King name
"Rhadamanthys"
Greek A son of Zeus and Europa, and brother of king Minos of Crete, or, according to others, a son of Hephaestus. From fear of his brother he fled to Ocaleia in Boeotia, and there married Alcmene. In consequence of his justice throughout life, he became, after his death, one of the judges in the lower world, and took up his abode in Elysium. Greek
King name
"Scylla"
Greek And Charybdis, the names of two rocks between Italy and Sicily, and only a short distance from one another. In the midst of the one of these rocks which was nearest to Italy, there dwelt, according to Homer, Scylla, a daughter of Crataeis, a fearful monster, barking like a dog, with twelve feet, six long necks and mouths, each of which contained three rows of sharp teeth. The opposite rock, which was much lower, contained an immense fig-tree, under which there dwelt Charybdis, who thrice every day swallowed down the waters of the sea, and thrice threw them up again: both were formidable to the ships which had to påśś between them. Greek

"Typhoeus"
Greek A giant with a hundred heads, fearful eyes, and a most terrible voice. He was the father of the Harpies. Zeus killed him with a thunderbolt, and he lies buried under Mount Etna. Greek
Goddess name
"Metis"
Greek Goddess of wisdom. The daughter of OKEANOS and TETHYS. The original consort of ZEUS and mother of ATHENA. According to legend, Zeus swallowed her because he feared she would engender a child more powerful than he....
God name
"Ouranos"
Greek Primordial god of heaven. The creator and incestuous consort of the earth mother GAIA with whom he engendered six giant sons—OKEANOS, Koeos, Kreos, HYPERION, IAPETOS and KRONOS—and six daughters—Klymene, RHEA, THEA, THETIS, MNEMOSYNE and Phoebe—the twelve collectively being known as the TITANS. fearing their power, Ouranos hurled them into the abyss of Tartaros and chained them up....
Angel name
"Pahad"
Hebrew The angel who personifies fear and terror. Hebrew
Demon name
"Ambika"
Hindu A feminine personification of Parvati in Hindu mythology who could transform herself into the fearsome Kali and kill demons with a supersonic hum. Hindu
God name
"Maturaiviran"
Hindu Locally worshiped god. Of fearsome character, he is the deification of a seventeenth century policeman who eloped with a princess and was slain. Known from southern India, where he is also a god of wine. Attributes: shield and sword....
Goddess name
"Nirrti (destruction)"
Hindu / Vedic / Puranic (1) Destructive goddess of darkness. Known chiefly from the Rg-veda, Nirrti has a generally malignant aspect and is åśśociated with pain, misfortune and death. She is believed to live in the south (the land of the dead). She is dark-skinned, wears dark dress and receives the “dark husks” of sacrifice. She is feared by many Hindus, whose offerings are frequent and repeated. In later Hinduism, Nirrti changes sex and becomes a dikpala god of terrifying appearance, guarding the southwestern quarter; he has various consorts including Davi, Kalika and Krsnangi. He stands upon a lion, a man or a corpse. Attributes: javelin, shield, staff, sword and teeth.(2) God. Buddhist. A dikpala or guardian. Color: blue. Stands upon a corpse. Attributes: shield and sword....
Goddess name
"Budhi Pallien"
India A fearsome goddess of Forests and jungles, who roams northern India in the form of a tiger. India
God name
"Tunek"
Inuit God of seal hunters. A fearsome being of huge stature (13 feet tall) who lives on the ice fields and is capable of running very fast. He also sits in his kaiak in the fog and catches seal in huge traps....
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8 ways to attend college for free

1. Grants and scholarships
Financial aid — the traditional way of eliminating college costs — is still available. To increase the odds of landing grants and scholarships, Doug Hewitt, co-author of “Free College Resource Book,” advises students to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, and then focus on local prizes.

“There are more scholarships you’ll qualify for in your home state than nationally,” says Hewitt. “Look at local organizations and talk to your high school (guidance) counselor.”

And remember to start your search early. You won’t be the only person wondering how to go to college for free and scholarships can be limited to a first come, first served basis. You should also keep in mind that you don’t need to wait for your senior year to start hunting for scholarships. There are grants and awards available at all high school grade levels.

2. Give service to your country
The U.S. Coast Guard, Air Force, Military (West Point), Merchant Marine and Naval academies offer free college opportunities to students who serve after college, but cash is also available through ROTC programs closer to home.

Service requirements for ROTC programs vary, but all require students to complete military training on campus and commit to up to 12 years, depending on the branch of service. Students leave with training, a guaranteed job and opportunities for more free education.

AmeriCorps, a national service organization that offers education awards in exchange for community work, provides an award of up to $5,730 for each full year of service. Maximum years of service vary among AmeriCorps programs. Members also receive a living stipend while serving in the program.

3. Work for the school
Schools charge students tuition, but their employees often can get a free education. “This is a great option, especially for older students with job experience,” says Reyna Gobel, author of “CliffsNotes Graduation Debt.” “If you’re 18, you might not qualify for a job that provides (tuition) benefits.”

Schools typically provide benefits for full-time workers and sometimes require a certain level of experience, Gobel says. Future students can find out about their school’s policy by calling the admissions office.

4. Waive your costs
Some students can get a free pass based on academic performance or other factors.

The North American Council on Adoptable Children in St. Paul, Minnesota, reports that Connecticut, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida and Maryland offer waivers at certain public schools for adopted and foster care children.

Other schools offer waivers for Native American students, senior citizens and dislocated workers. To find out what your school offers, call the financial aid office.

5. Become an apprentice
An apprenticeship is another solid option when you’re determining how to get free tuition. They can also open you up to job opportunities post-college.

Overall, your average apprenticeship program will take 1-6 years. You will probably be required to put in that time along with at least 2,000 hours of field work annually. The good news is that there are apprenticeships in more than 1,000 occupations, which can give you more options.

In exchange, the sponsoring employer pays for college or technical training and provides a salary. A list of available programs is available at the ApprenticeshipUSA website.

6. Have your employer pick up the costs
Another way you might receive a free college education is through your employer. Often given in the form of an employee reimbursement, there are plenty of employers that can help curb the cost of higher education.

7. Be in demand
Another great way to find out how to go to college for free is to determine if your field of study is “high-needs.” Will your studies result in a career that’s high in demand? Ask yourself this before you even enroll if you’re trying to cut the cost of college.

Generally, schools will offer incentives to anyone focusing their studies on math, science, nursing, teaching, and social work. There are also additional opportunities available through organizations like Teach for America, the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program and the National Institutes of Health.

The nursing program at the University of Portland in Oregon has offered scholarships covering approximately 80% of the final 2 years of undergraduate study, if students sign a 3-year employment contract with the local health system, Fabriquer says. “There are similar programs in (high-needs) fields across the country,” he adds.

8. Choose a school that pays you
Last on our list of ways on how to get free tuition, and probably the riskiest. There are, indeed, schools that will pay you to focus your studies in a single subject (which they dictate). Schools such as the Webb Institute and the Curtis Institute of Music offer a select range of academic programs and pick up the tuition cost for every student. Just think long and hard about your decision before you commit to this course.